A footnote to Hungarian-Iranian friendship

To illustrate that Ali Ahnani's visit to Hungary was more than a courtesy call or simply an Iranian initiative that was reluctantly accepted by Hungary, here is a piece of news that on the surface might sound trivial but surely it is not.

Magyar Post and Iran Post have released a joint stamp.Iranian-Hungarian stamp The Hungarian issue uses the same designs as the Iranian stamps and is due to be released on December 31, 2010. On the 80 ft Hungarian stamp there are Termeh motifs from Yazd and on the 240 ft stamp Jazygian (jász) embroidery motifs are shown. The background printing of both stamps has the colors of the national flag of the respective country, and the inscriptions are in both Hungarian and Persian. The first day cover for the set is adorned by Jazygian embroidery (tulips and rosemary with eagle talons). The commemorative postmark employs a graphic combination of the Hungarian and Iranian motifs of the stamps.

The Jazygians (jászok), a people of Alan origin, arrrived in Hungary accompanying the Cumans (kunok), fleeing from the advancing Mongols in the thirteenth century. The Jazygians spoke an Indo-European language and were related to today's Iranians.

Issuing a new stamp, especially simultaneously in two countries, is a fairly lengthy affair. Diplomatic negotiations first have to settle whether it is a good idea politically to undertake such an endevour. Then comes the design involving two countries. All in all, this stamp business has been in the works for months.

I still think that it might not have been such a good idea to advertise this close friendship and cooperation between the two countries. Quiet diplomacy is obviously not a strong point of János Martonyi and Viktor Orbán.

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Öcsi
Guest

I’m sure these stamps will interest philatelists but most people will find it as interesting as commemorative horseshoes. No one’s going to give a damn because almost no one uses postage stamps any more. They belong to a bygone era, much like the über-nationalism that Orbán, Fidesz and Jobbik espouse.
But it’s instructive to see two backward looking nations (one a pariah state and the other a wannabe pariah state) honour each other – with postage stamps. It may have meant something a hundred years ago, but today?? Zip! Nothing!

Eva S. Balogh
Guest

Öcsi: “But it’s instructive to see two backward looking nations (one a pariah state and the other a wannabe pariah state) honour each other – with postage stamps. It may have meant something a hundred years ago, but today?? Zip! Nothing!”
I think you underestimate the importance of a gesture like that. Especially when the stamps come out at the time of the NATO missile shield against Iran.

Paul
Guest

I take issue with this lazy assumption that Iran is “a pariah state”. Not all of us in ‘old Europe’ swallow this propaganda.
True, there is a ‘pariah’ state in the Middle-East. A state that has invaded its neighbours’ lands and is not only refusing to give them up, despite many UN resolutions, but is actively populating them with settlements of its own people.
A state that not only behaves appallingly towards the inhabitants of those occupied territories, but also treats one part of its own population as second class.
And a state that already HAS nuclear weapons.
But that state is not Iran.
Indeed Iran is not guilty of any of these things. It may not be a place where most of us would like to live, it may have an anti-democratic government with extreme religious views, but, compared to Israel, it’s crimes are insignificant.
So why all the propaganda against Iran? Could it be that while we’re all concentrating on them, we’re not getting too bothered about what’s going on a few kilometres away – and that that would suit certain countries very well?

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