Happy Thanksgiving!

The birds pictured below are the real wild turkeys. The kind who visit often. Some of them are quite ferocious. One day about half a dozen of them gathered outside and pecked madly on the windows and the door sidelights on the lower level of the house. I was afraid that they would succeed in breaking into the house.

But most of the time they are peaceful and dumb. Very dumb. A whole flock will cross the roads around here without paying the slightest attention to the traffic.

These are not the kind you want to eat. They are tough old birds with tiny breasts. But in the fall of 1621 the Pilgrims were happy to have even them to eat.

The wild turkeys of New England

When it comes to stuffed turkey recipes I decided to go international. I came upon a recipe in Marosvásárhelyi Infó, a Hungarian Internet publication from  Târgu Mureș, Romania. The original recipe appeared in Urbanlifestyle /Oraşul găteşte, a Romanian-language publication. Soon enough I found the original Romanian version called “Curcan umplut” which simply means stuffed turkey, or “töltött pulyka” in the Hungarian version.

It does look great.

Stuffed turkey from Transylvania

As Julia Child would say: Bon appétit!

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Guest

A happy Thanksgiving to you too, Eva – and all the fellow “acolytes” here …

BTW, I looked up the definition of acolyte on wiki and here it is:

“An acolyte in its original religious definition is one who assists a higher-ranking member of a church or cult.”

So now we/you’ve been upgraded to a church – maybe you should ask the Hungarian government for recognition (and money …) ?

Guest
London Calling! Yes! Happy Thanksgiving too Eva! (In England, of course, we have to work!) Wolfi! You take me back a few years! – When at school I was a genuine – real McCoy – ‘Acolyte’! It was a church school and the church procession was made up of innocent looking (only!) schoolboys in cassocks and white ruffs. The bloke at the front who carried the cross is the ‘Crucifer’. The two behind carried the candles – and are called ‘Acolytes’. As identical twins, my brother and I we were very precious! We were in the ‘A’ team and always had to carry the candles and burn our eyebrows! We always got to do the high religious days – Easter, Christmas etc. Then comes the ‘Thurifer’! The best job of the lot – and one which I coveted most. He’s (never a she in high Church of England!) the one who swings the big brass ‘Thurible’ – you know – that bonfire on a chain! It was full of glowing charcoal with beads of incense added periodically to produce that wonderful smell of incense. I got to do it a few times. (To complete the picture the ‘Clerk’ comes next,… Read more »
Guest

Obama has pardoned two turkeys. Orban could get ahead by offering a general amnesty for plagiarizers.

Guest

Thanks, Charlie, for those memories! I didn’t really know that the Anglican church had rituals like those Catholics – but actually I never cared for religion at all…

And I can tell you why:

When I was six years old I was very happy to be able to go to school with my kindergarden friend, but then I was thoroughly disappointed when I learned that he was going to the Catholic primary school while I was going to the Protestant primary school – in the same old building, but with a wall put in!

That’s when I decided religion was something bad …

PS:

If my Protestant father would not have returned from the war then I would have been raised a Catholic by my Catholic mother – they had agreed on that when the war started that they’d baptise their children only when the war was finished.

PPS:

“The God Delusion” by Richard Dawkins was a rather late addition to my library, bur very welcome.

Bowen
Guest

Jean P :
Obama has pardoned two turkeys. Orban could get ahead by offering a general amnesty for plagiarizers.

And Azeri axe-murderers.

Csoda. Kegy
Guest

Time to add a 7th official day of mourning (emlék/gyásznap) to the Hungarian calendar? Would an increase in imbalance with official celebration days (3) help OV, I wonder? Enjoy your thanksgiving!

Mark
Guest

Having grown up and spent most of my life with Thanksgiving turkey, I recently have been converted and much prefer the more flavorful Hungarian roast goose, especially on St. Martin’s Day, with the new wine!

Member

Happy belated Thanksgiving to all!

Member

Off-topic, but since it has been mentioned:

WHAT IS THE TURKEY’S OFFENCE?

Is everyone inured to the irony of calling the annual ritual slaughter of tens of millions of innocent creatures “Thanksgiving”?

What’s unpardonable is the wanton breeding and butchery. And not just of turkeys.

Luxe, nécessité, souffrance: pourquoi je ne suis pas carnivore
http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/harnad/Temp/carntemp.pdf

Member

STOP VEGETABLE GENOCIDE

http://www.vegetablecruelty.com

Member

For those interesting in reflecting seriously rather than just quipping: plants are living organisms, but they lack a nervous system, hence they do not feel (just as the cells and organisms in our own bodies — all capable of living independently — do not feel). What matters is how we treat feeling creatures.

(Don’t feel so proud that you feel free to jest about pain and suffering that is not your own; that view has a long and unadmirable history. And it does not do credit to the moral causes that you do feel strongly about.)

http://turingc.blogspot.ca

Guest

London Calling!

Well, Well, Well!

Knock me down with a feather:

Plants! living organisms… well well well!

And no nervous systems either…. well well well!

Regards

Charlie

Guest

And ……..If ‘Turing’ refers to our Alan Turing…

He was a deeper thinker than that.

But hey!..Maybe it doesn’t!

Member
Eva S. Balogh : Mark : Having grown up and spent most of my life with Thanksgiving turkey, I recently have been converted and much prefer the more flavorful Hungarian roast goose, especially on St. Martin’s Day, with the new wine! To tell you the truth I’m not that keen on turkey. It is very dry and tasteless and it doesn’t really matter how much one tries to marinate it or put all sorts of dry rub inside of it or on its skin. Generally I do not like Turkey either. Still, yesterday as I was bouncing around my favourite shopping places while trying to figure out what to cook up, I came across a 30% off turkey breast. Thanksgiving across the board, 30% of turkey breast, so be it. I love to cook and bake by the way, and I think I am really good about it, yet I never made any turkey. So, I took the breast home, and although my family wasn’t thrilled at first, I am happy to report that my turkey experiment worked out, and I made the most moist, skin-crackling turkey ever, with fantastic gravy. My kids had second and even third servings. At… Read more »
Guest

London Calling!

This is the Best Recipe for Turkey:

Preparation:

Place Turkey in large roasting dish; Baste with lard; Open the back door; Set the ‘wheelie-bin’ lid to ‘open’.

Roast the Turkey as usual.

When cooked remove and drain Turkey from roasting dish (‘stab’ breast with two forks) – then walk into the garden with it and drop into the prepared ‘wheelie’bin’.

Now the important bit: Drain the remaining hot fluid and fat into a glass Pyrex bowl and place carefully and gently into the fridge – because it is most precious.

Boxing-day Morning: Prepare toast and spread with a section of the fat with a quantity of the jelly in the bowl.

Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Wonderful Turkey Dripping!

Regards

Charlie

(btw – don’t forget to close the wheelie-bin, or you’ll have a plague of foxes)

Member

But arent the feelings also chemical reactions? In what way do the molecules in your nerves different from molecules in other cells?

Guest

@Steven Harnad:

Thanks very much for the link to that fascinating conference on Turing and consciousness – sometimes I wish I was younger and could start that career in mathematical logic …

But I’m probably too stupid anyway to really “understand” the thinking of Turing, Gödel etc …. – it was surely a better idea to get into computers!

Re turkeys (and even more OT):

There’s an old joke about two Prussian lords getting drunk in a bar, where one of them boasts that he has a farm worker who could eat a whole large turkey by himself – so they make a bet …

When the day comes the worker’s boss has a bad feeling so in order to facilitate the meal he asks his cook to prepare the meat in different dishes to make it easier.

Watching the worker downing the different turkey dishes (like turkey soup, turkey salad, turkey souffle …) he asks the worker at one point whether he’ll really manage to eat all of the turkey.

The worker replies: If you don’t give me too many of these appetizers before the real thing starts …

Guest

London Calling!

As the world trips over itself to copy Hungary’s (Matolcsy’s) ‘success story’ S&P have ruined the party by downgrading Hungary to ‘BB’ from ‘BB+’

(Fitch have said they will review their rating ‘before Christmas’, with Hungary on ‘negative watch’)

As the world beats a well-trodden path to Matolcsy’s door to seek his advice – the FT has rated all of the EU’s Economy Ministers – and placed Matolcsy second from last – in 18th place! Spoilsports! (Mind you the UK is only 15!)

As the International Banks all clamber to follow Matolcsy’s example of smashing the banks – the Chief Executive of Raiffeisen is threatening to pull out of Hungary all-togther (as predicted!) – if only in the short term.

And we all watch the rate of inflation (6%) – and how the Central Bank committee (well Orban’s placemen on it) keeps lowering the interest rate to push inflation even higher – as wages show only a 1% increase because of it.

Go! Go! György  – we’re all right behind you – watching you as an example to us all!

…of what NOT to do!

Regards

Charlie

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20121123-707899.html
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/617b5920-3324-11e2-aabc-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2D4qz4kqG
http://www.portfolio.hu/en/economy/hungary_orban_should_stop_using_banks_as_self-service_shops_raiffeisens_stepic.25180.html

Mark
Guest

Eva S. Balogh :

Mark :
Having grown up and spent most of my life with Thanksgiving turkey, I recently have been converted and much prefer the more flavorful Hungarian roast goose, especially on St. Martin’s Day, with the new wine!

To tell you the truth I’m not that keen on turkey. It is very dry and tasteless and it doesn’t really matter how much one tries to marinate it or put all sorts of dry rub inside of it or on its skin.

I suspect the dryness is due to the cooker, or over-cooker, and not the cookee. Same issue as chicken breast, which Hungarians seem to overcook regularly.