Fidesz reaction to political setback: Continued falsehoods

The standard reference book of Hungarian sayings and proverbs contains dozens of examples related to lies and lying. I would like to single out two that apply to daily politics in today’s Hungary.

The first is an assessment of the fate of a liar. According to the Hungarian proverb, “it is easier to catch a liar than a lame dog.” The second claims that “a man who comes from afar can easily be believed.” As far as the first saying goes, if folk wisdom centuries ago thought that liars cannot fool people for very long this is especially true today after the communication revolution we have witnessed in the last twenty years or so. As for the second, it is less and less true that a person from faraway places can tell tall tales without being found out.

Fidesz politicians, however, are behind the times and keep repeating lies. Lies about the world, about the Hungarian economic situation, about their own earlier statements, and about Hungary’s future prospects. Despite the repeated unveiling of their lies, the lying goes on. I guess they believe that repeated lies stick. Hungarian society is so polarized that the majority of Fidesz voters would never think of reading newspapers or visiting Internet sites that are critical of the government. Repeated lies, as another Hungarian saying asserts, eventually become truth (at least for the party faithful).

In the old days it was fairly cumbersome to fact-check statements about events that happened, let’s say, ten years ago. Today this task is a great deal easier, although in my opinion Internet papers could further assist researchers by expanding their archival search functions. But let’s not complain, because what we have is already splendid in comparison to what we used to have at our disposal.

And now on to the real topic of  today’s post: Antal Rogán’s latest performance. On January 4 Rogán was a guest on Olga Kálmán’s Egyenes beszéd. Kálmán began with a question: how is it that within a few days he changed his mind on the government’s response to the question of voter registration? After all, on December 28, right after the Constitutional Court’s decision that found the so-called “temporary provisions” unconstitutional, he and József Szájer, the “author” of the new constitution, confidently announced their plans to put the “temporary provisions” into the main body of the constitution. That would certainly solve the problem. And now, Kálmán continued, there is a 180° turnabout. Fidesz decided not to circumvent the decision of the court. What is the explanation, she wanted to know.

Rogán didn’t flinch. He outright denied that any such words left his or Szájer’s mouth. No gentle prodding by Kálmán could move him from this position. “This is not what I said. What I said was that we respect the decision of the court and since the objections were only formal objections we  will move the ‘temporary provisions’ into the main body of the constitution.” As for the law on the election procedure, Rogán claimed that he refused to comment on a law that was still under consideration by the court.  Here is an excerpt from the Rogán interview. The complete version can be viewed on ATV’s website.

Well, checking the accuracy of Antal Rogán’s contention was easy enough. YouTube already had the video of the ten-minute Rogán-Szájer press conference online. Szájer used most of the press conference to explain the “historic reasons” for not including the “temporary provisions” in the constitution proper and to outline how the parliament will vote on a bill that will move these provisions into the constitution. That should satisfy the court. And naturally, the law on electoral procedures was one of these “temporary provisions.” At the end of the press conference a reporter asked Rogán about the electoral law. Rogán repeated Szájer’s opinion that they have to address only the court’s formal objections, which can be remedied by incorporating the law into the main body of the constitution. He added that parliament doesn’t have to revisit this law because the objections were formal. Not a word about not wanting to comment on the law that is still under consideration by the court. You can see on the video of the press conference of December 28, 2012.

This particular lie was easy to detect. Another one, I must admit, I didn’t catch, most likely because I have been following Hungarian politics only since 1994-95 and Rogán’s second lie touched on something before that date. It was Zsuzsa Kerekes, a lawyer, who called attention to that lie in Galamus. Rogán called Olga Kálmán’s attention to a grave unconstitutional act by the MSZP-SZDSZ government in 1994 when the government, using its two-thirds majority, put into the constitution a provision that deprived Hungarian citizens of their voting right if they happened to be abroad on the day of the election although the Constitutional Court found this part of the election law to be unconstitutional in March of 1990.

MemoryAs it turned out, the whole story is a typical Fidesz fabrication. In October 1989  the last parliament of the Kádár regime did vote on the electoral law, including this particular provision. The Constitutional Court that was established in October 1989 indeed found in March 1990 that this particular article in the law was unconstitutional. But it wasn’t the MSZP-SZDSZ dominated parliament that put this provision into the constitution but the parliament of the Németh government on March 9, 1990.

Zsuzsa Kerekes found it unfortunate that Olga Kálmán didn’t remember this particular detail. As a result, “as with so many other Fidesz lies it remained unquestioned and uncorrected.” I have to come to Olga Kálmán’s defense. I also occasionally feel that I could have brought up events or points that contradict the “recollections” of Fidesz politicians that were missed by the reporter. But it is one thing to watch a conversation from the outside and something else to be able to react very quickly under pressure. Moreover, unfortunately, we can’t remember everything even under normal circumstances. And since I started with proverbs here is another Hungarian saying: “A fejem nem káptalan” (My head is not a chapter). What can this possibly mean? Help me out!

55 comments

  1. Eva S. Balogh :

    gdfxx :
    Káptalan does not mean chapter, according to the Magyar Ertelmezo” Szo’ta’r (Akademiai Konyvkiado, Budapest 1987) but it is a religious term meaning: “puspokseg, szekesegyhaz stb. mellett mukodo tanacsado papi testulet” or in English a consulting group of priests for a high religious office (such as bishopry).

    That’s exactly what Chapter means. It designates an eclesiastical body.

    I love this blog. Never heard of this meaning of the word, thanks. I guess it shows my lack of familiarity with religious orders…

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  2. Meanwhile on Planet Hungary …

    Rozsa Hoffman, undersecretary of education, continues her crusade against foreign languages. Now she came up with the genius plan to make Latin mandatory in the eight year high schools.

    Explanation: “teaching Latin will establish the pursuit of national and social cohesion and the common good”.

    I guess she figured out that the immigration to the ancient Rome by fresh graduates is pretty low.

    Futue te ipsum Rosa!

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  3. Two pieces of news worth noticing
    1. The local referendum in Gyömrő against renaming “Freedom” square to “Horthy” square has failed, since the turnout was below 50% (it was just 18%). What I do not understand, Fidesz just made a law banning street names of personalities that contributed to the establishment of 20th century dictatorships in Hungary. They want to rename Leo Frankel street (he died in the 19th century) to the (bad) King Sigismund street using this law.

    Horthy, on the other hand, was the creator of the right-wing dictatorship himself, but he seems to be kosher. That is double standard!

    2. The Sukoro trial started today. The judge refused to dismiss the venue of the case.
    The Chief of Judiciary, Orban’s personal friend, changed the venue to Szolnok, where the government can expect friendly outcome. The law permitting this was declared unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court, but the local judge [and the Orban gov’t in the background] dismissed their verdict, stating that they overturned the law by using formal argument and not substantial argument.

    This what I call tyranny.

    The whole trial is a show trial. They charge officials from the previous gov’t for making a disadvantageous real estate deal with American-Israeli investors. But the whole investment deal was never finalized, so there was no financial loss to Hungary caused by these officials to start with.

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  4. Klubrádió – loud and clear on my iPhone too, tested on four different apps/players, one better than the other, but still alive and kicking, nonetheless.

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  5. OT:

    Look what I just found in wiki:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horthy

    “Horthy married with Magdolna Purgly in Arad in 1901. The Purgly family (Originally: Wodianer family) was of Jewish origin. The Purgly family babtized and converted to Calvinism in the late 19th century.[4]”

    Someone put this in – with the same grammatical and spelling errors as before in the entry on the wife …

    Ain’t life strange ?

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  6. “Fidesz politicians, however, are behind the times and keep repeating lies. Lies about the world, about the Hungarian economic situation, about their own earlier statements, and about Hungary’s future prospects. Despite the repeated unveiling of their lies, the lying goes on. I guess they believe that repeated lies stick. Hungarian society is so polarized that the majority of Fidesz voters would never think of reading newspapers or visiting Internet sites that are critical of the government. Repeated lies, as another Hungarian saying asserts, eventually become truth (at least for the party faithful).

    The bad news is, that repeated lies do stick!
    Proof positive, that the almighty leader of the faithful masses called Viktor Orbán.
    Of course, another necessary ingredient, the mindless blind faith comes handy too, and there is no shortage in that feature either – after all, we are talking about Hungarians, aren’t we..?

    The only hope over there lays once again by the youth – apparently they are determined not to give in to the orbanist BS., – thumbs up and best wishes!

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  7. tappanch :

    Horthy, on the other hand, was the creator of the right-wing dictatorship himself, but he seems to be kosher. That is double standard!

    Sorry, but in what way was he a dictator? As I understand, there were elections during that time, and Horthy was pretty much a fairly powerless figurehead, like the president is today.

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  8. Mutt :
    Meanwhile on Planet Hungary …
    Rozsa Hoffman, undersecretary of education, continues her crusade against foreign languages. Now she came up with the genius plan to make Latin mandatory in the eight year high schools.
    Explanation: “teaching Latin will establish the pursuit of national and social cohesion and the common good”.
    I guess she figured out that the immigration to the ancient Rome by fresh graduates is pretty low.
    Futue te ipsum Rosa!

    I wouldn’t be too quick to discount Latin. Of all my high school subjects, the two that had lasting usefulness were, typing and Latin.

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  9. petofi :
    I wouldn’t be too quick to discount Latin. Of all my high school subjects, the two that had lasting usefulness were, typing and Latin.

    They WERE useful in the past, no doubt. But today English and computer knowledge beat them.

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    1. @ Mutt. If you aren’t kidding, I’d have to say that this is the most minimalist educational philosophy I ever heard of. Computer knowledge, typing, driving license are not subjects but auxiliary skills you obtain on the way. My kids and I had Latin, Greek, English, French apart from our mother tongue, In addition, higher maths, physics, chemistry, biology, a lot of literature and history – just the normal curriculum of a school that you finish with a certificate that makes you fit for enrolling at a university. None of us would want to have missed any of those subjects.

      Seven years ago I moved into a region where they only speak Italian. So I learned that, too (after I had turned 60). It’s fun, believe me!

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  10. Mutt :

    petofi :
    I wouldn’t be too quick to discount Latin. Of all my high school subjects, the two that had lasting usefulness were, typing and Latin.

    They WERE useful in the past, no doubt. But today English and computer knowledge beat them.

    For computers..you need typing skills; for English you need knowledge of Latin.

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  11. wolfi :
    OT:
    Look what I just found in wiki:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horthy
    “Horthy married with Magdolna Purgly in Arad in 1901. The Purgly family (Originally: Wodianer family) was of Jewish origin. The Purgly family babtized and converted to Calvinism in the late 19th century.[4]”
    Someone put this in – with the same grammatical and spelling errors as before in the entry on the wife …
    Ain’t life strange ?

    This was just a lie the Arrow Cross spread about Horthy’s wife in 1944 to put pressure on him. Their slogan was “Rebecca, out of your palace”.

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  12. I attempted to add the facts about the post-2010 situation to the wiki article “History of Hungary” several times a year ago, but 2-3 vigilant guards erased my contributions very quickly, so I gave up this futile effort.

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  13. Minusio :
    @ Mutt. If you aren’t kidding, I’d have to say that this is the most minimalist educational philosophy I ever heard of

    Oh, no … I’m always serious.

    Well I didn’t want to go this deep. I’m just saying that for the average Joe, Latin is useless as tits on the boar hog. So making it mandatory (and this is what I’m objecting to) is a bad idea. If we can teach them one living language somehow that would be great.

    For me Math and Phys Ed had most lasting effect in high school.

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    1. @ Mutt. Although I was leaning towards languages, I loved maths (and was good at it). In the penultimate school I attended we had Phys Ed every day – and I loved it (even won a regional championship in long jump and sprint when I was 15 :-) ).

      But this whole discussion went off on a tangent… which is fun in a way, too.

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  14. wolfi :
    OT:
    Look what I just found in wiki:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horthy
    “Horthy married with Magdolna Purgly in Arad in 1901. The Purgly family (Originally: Wodianer family) was of Jewish origin. The Purgly family babtized and converted to Calvinism in the late 19th century.[4]”
    Someone put this in – with the same grammatical and spelling errors as before in the entry on the wife …
    Ain’t life strange ?

    Nope, I’ve since deleted that canard — but expect it to be reinstated periodically by “Check Mate” and his fellow purglers under various creative noms de brume…

    (I’ve left in the “married with,” though, as a kind of sentimental gesture…)

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  15. Mutt: “Well I didn’t want to go this deep. I’m just saying that for the average Joe, Latin is useless as tits on the boar hog. So making it mandatory (and this is what I’m objecting to) is a bad idea. If we can teach them one living language somehow that would be great.”

    Totally agree. I learned latin in high school for 4 years. It was fun I liked it a lot, learned a lot of Roman history which I always loved, it really is a logical language that’s fun to play with. But was it useful? Hardly. I only remember a few proverbs and saying in Latin which is a cool party trick, but I’m pretty sure speaking e.g. Spanish or French on a communication level (which is can be easily achieved in 3×45 mins a week for four years) would be an even better one.

    I think all this is just a childish rebellion against the Anglo-saxon cultural expansion, that is perceived by many (wrongly I think) as a globalization related threat against national identity.

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  16. AP published a rather meaningless article about the Bayer affair that appeared in the Washington Post

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/outrage-in-hungary-over-anti-roma-article-by-journalist-member-of-governing-fidesz-party/2013/01/08/4f16e162-59b4-11e2-b8b2-0d18a64c8dfa_story.html

    “kgyd, a physicist from Hungary” wrote this comment:

    “The title falsely suggests that Mr. Bayer, the writer of the criticized column, is closely associated with the Hungarian government, therefore his statements reflect the opinion of the government. This is the sole interest and the only justification of WP’s story. A racist column in a Hungarian daily close to the extreme right “Jobbik” party (circulation about 10000) has little interest for the reader in the US. A racist government in Europe is outrageous and threatening. Even though 25 years ago Mr. Bayer was founding member of Fidesz, the governing centre-right party, he left Fidesz in the early 1990’s and has no ties with the government. Therefore this is a false and fabricated story.

    The WP’s journalist could only dig out one sign of present tie between Mr. Bayer and the government: Mr. Bayer was one of the “organizers” (whatever it means) of a recent pro-government demonstration. The agenda of that demonstration was not internal politics but Brussels’ interference with Hungarian internal politics, mostly on details of how the government should restore macroeconomic stability. The demonstrators felt that Brussels’ requirements of specific measures such as lowering pensions is interference with Hungary’s sovereignty. The relation of Brussels’ central power and the sovereignty of the member states is a central issue of the extreme right. No wonder Mr. Bayer called his readers to participate in this demonstration. However, by no means this justifies a claim of strong ties between Mr. Bayer and the government.”

    Amazing how some people can distort facts. Magyar Hirlap, for example, became a paper of Jobbik and Bayer’s only recent connection with Orbán Viktor is the organization of the Peace March which, according to kgyd, had no domestic importance. It was about two weeks ago that Orbán specifically thanked the organizers because without the Peace March he wouldn’t be the prime minister of the country today.

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