Viktor Orbán finally spoke against Vladimir Putin; Kim Scheppele’s “Hungary, An Election in Question, Part 1”

Over the next five days, in addition to my regular daily posts, I will republish Professor Kim Scheppele’s five-part series on the pitfalls of the new election law that makes free and fair elections in Hungary doubtful. The article, entitled “Hungary, An Election in Question,” originally appeared on Paul Krugman’s blog on February 28, 2014 in The New York Times.

The reason that I asked Professor Scheppele to allow me to publish her article on Hungarian Spectrum is because, although we always knew that the newly enacted law was slanted in favor of the current government party, news coming from Budapest of late indicates that the situation is worse than we ever imagined. The opposition’s advertising options have been greatly restricted. And it seems that even the few posters the opposition candidates managed to put up are systematically being torn down. Budapest and other cities are full of posters of so-called civic groups campaigning for the government while the opposition has virtually no advertising presence. So, the more people read Professor Scheppele’s analysis of the new Hungarian  electoral law the better.

And now back to the Hungarian government’s attitude toward Ukraine. It was only yesterday at noon that Viktor Orbán said anything substantive about the Ukrainian crisis. In his statement he kept his concerns narrow and provincial, presumably not wanting to criticize his newly acquired friend, Vladimir Putin. His only concern seemed to be the safety of the Hungarian minority in Subcarpathia. He sent them a message: “you can count on us.” He added that “Hungary is not part of the conflict.” Well, in a narrow sense, perhaps not, but the conflict directly involves the European Union and Hungary’s neighbor, whose territorial integrity has been challenged.

Today the prime minister decided to elaborate on his position, crafting it to be more in line with EU thinking, a wise move since on Thursday he will attend an EU summit in Brussels. He will “represent the standpoint that the European Union will have to respond to the Russian military moves,” a response that has to be “immediate, unambiguous, and integrative.” He further elaborated on the theme when he announced that “the only alternative to war is negotiation. We want negotiations and not military conflict. We want peace, not blood.” Hungary wants a democratic Ukraine. Again, he stressed that “in the whole Ukrainian crisis the most important consideration for Hungary is the safety of Hungarians in Hungary and in Subcarpathia.” Note that he didn’t mention anything about the territorial integrity of Ukraine.

While Viktor Orbán talked to the media in Budapest, Vladimir Putin gave a press conference just outside of Moscow in Novo-Ogaryovo. It was a long and fairly rambling talk in which he announced that he had given up, at least for the time being, plans for the annexation of the Crimea. However, although he knows about and even condemns Yanukovych’s thievery, he still considers him to be the legitimate head of Ukraine and therefore refuses to recognize the interim government formed a few days ago.

Hungary is after all a neighbor of Ukraine

Hungary is after all a neighbor of Ukraine

Mid-afternoon the prime minister’s office released the “Statement of the Prime Ministers of the Visegrád Countries on Ukraine.” If we compare the text of this joint statement of the Polish, Czech, Slovak, and Hungarian prime ministers to Orbán’s words, we see that the joint statement is a great deal stronger. Let me quote a few sentences from this document.

The Prime Ministers of the Visegrád Countries are deeply concerned about the recent violation of Ukraine’s territorial integrity and the fact that the Russian parliament has authorized military action on Ukrainian soil against the wishes of the Ukrainian Government…. We condemn all action threatening the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine and call on Russia to decrease the tensions immediately through dialogue, in full respect of Ukrainian and international law and in line with the provisions of the 1994 Budapest Memorandum.

The Visegrád Countries believe that the recent military actions by Russia are not only in violation of international law, but also create a dangerous new reality in Europe. The Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia are appalled to witness a military intervention in 21st century Europe akin to their own experiences in 1956, 1968 and 1981….

The European Union and NATO should demonstrate solidarity with and assist Ukraine in this difficult moment and stand united in the face of this dangerous development threatening European peace and security.

A few hours later Zsolt Németh, undersecretary in the Hungarian Foreign Ministry, spoke to Aleksandr Tolkach, Russian ambassador to Hungary. Németh called on Russia to move its troops back inside the Russian naval base in Sebastopol. Németh repeated that Hungary insists on Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and considers Russian behavior contrary to international law. So, it seems that Viktor Orbán eventually had to conform to the position held by the United States and the European Union. It must have been a bitter pill to swallow.

* * *

Hungary: An Election in Question, Part 1

Professor Kim Scheppele, Princeton University

Hungary’s parliamentary elections will be held on 6 April. And it is already clear who will win. Unless something truly surprising occurs, the governing party Fidesz is headed to victory. The only uncertainty is whether it will again win two-thirds of the parliamentary seats, a result that would continue to allow it to change the constitution at will.

Fidesz won the last elections in 2010 fair and square. But this time the election is unlikely to be judged so favorably. The whole election framework – the laws, the institutions and even the new electorate – favors Fidesz because the governing party has used its four years in office with its two-thirds majority in the parliament to redesign every aspect of the electoral system to its advantage.

Fidesz also overwhelmingly dominates the offline media and has closed off almost all avenues through which opposition parties can reach the electorate. New decrees from local Fidesz-affiliated officials around the country and misleading instructions from election officials are creating last-minute campaign obstacles that put the opposition even more on the wrong foot.

Under the new election framework, the allied opposition parties cannot win a parliamentary majority, even if they gain more votes than the governing party. Simultaneously, the changes also make it nearly inevitable that the governing party will keep its two-thirds parliamentary majority even if it gets less than half of the overall vote.

Róbert László of the Political Capital think tank in Budapest shows how Fidesz can win a two-thirds majority with less than half of the party-list vote. His model also predicts that a united center-left opposition would need about 6% more votes than Fidesz to win a simple majority in the parliament.

Central European University Professor Gábor Tóka estimates that, under the new system, a united center-left opposition might get 8% fewer parliamentary seats than Fidesz if both got an equal share of the votes.

Political Capital’s “mandate calculator” permits everyone to try out different models and different assumptions. We tried it here in Princeton and, depending on the assumptions one makes about the nature and shape of the opposition, Fidesz could get its two-thirds majority in parliament pretty easily with only 48% of the vote if the other parties perform as polls indicate they would if the election were held now. If the foreign votes split 85/15 for Fidesz (not unreasonable for reasons I will explain), Fidesz could get its two-thirds with only 44%. If Fidesz wins by the same margin it won last time, with 53% of the party-list vote, it would get 76% of the seats in the parliament instead of the 68% it won under the old system.

In short, Fidesz has designed the election to allow itself to win big, even without majority support. Or, to put it differently, Fidesz has designed the election so that the opposition loses even if it wins.

These effects occur because the way that the districts are drawn and the votes are aggregated. It doesn’t even count all of the other things that Fidesz is doing to help the opposition lose, like monopolizing the media, operating an election office that is giving out misleading instructions and only selectively registering to vote Hungarian citizens who are living abroad.

If Fidesz is reelected under this self-dealing system, then it is hard to avoid the conclusion that the election has been rigged. Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s “mandate” will be tainted.

It’s serious to accuse an incumbent party of potentially rigging an election, so the evidence needs to be strong. In this series of five blog posts, I will show precisely how the outcome of the election is cooked into the rules even before a single ballot is cast. The rules were designed to look “normal” but to allow Fidesz to win in a very particular political context, which is where we will start.

As Fidesz officials are quick to argue, they will win the election because they are the most popular single party in Hungary. Which is true (see graph below). But Fidesz’s popularity has only recently climbed above 30%, a level that would cause analysts in most democratic states to predict that an incumbent party is in trouble, especially given how low Fidesz fell over the last several years. What makes Fidesz look like a winner, however, is that all of the other parties are even less popular.

voting intentionsFor the last month, however, Fidesz has been confronted by a more substantial opponent than it has had during its tenure in office so far. Five left-leaning parties calling themselves the “democratic opposition” have combined to form the Unity Alliance (Összefogás). They have put forward a common slate of candidates for the individual constituencies and they are running a joint party list. Their joint strength might just be enough to challenge Fidesz’s domination of the elections – if there were a level playing field. But they were late to the election party, so to speak, announcing their joint effort only on 14 January 2014 just before the election date was set. So they have some catching up to do.

(The five parties in the Unity Alliance are the Socialists/MSzP headed by Attila Mesterházy; Together 2014/E-14 headed by Gordon Bajnai; Dialogue for Hungary/PM led by Benedek Jávor; Democratic Coalition/DK headed by Ferenc Gyurcsány and the Hungarian Liberal Party/Liberálisok headed by Gábor Fodor. Since the coalition was formed, the Movement for a Modern Hungary/MOMA, headed by Lajos Bokros, a conservative MEP, has agreed to support the joint ticket.)

And then there is Jobbik, which its detractors call the “non-democratic opposition.” This far-right party has become internationally known for its anti-Semitism and anti-Roma agitation, its toxic assertion of nationalism, and its ideology so far beyond the edge of the European political spectrum that its three representatives in the European Parliament cannot affiliate with any party caucus. Fidesz might reasonably worry that it would lose votes to Jobbik on the right, which may be why many – including Jobbik’s leadership – claim that Fidesz is “stealing [their] issues and ideas.”  For its part, Jobbik’s campaign ads this year portray it as substantially more moderate than its reputation in order to steal voters from Fidesz.

At the moment, Jobbik seems to have the allegiance of just under 10% of the electorate, though some worry that Jobbik’s support may climb again to the 17% of the vote it won in the 2010 election. Jobbik cannot form a government with that vote, but is the only party that can seriously challenge Fidesz’s electoral strategy by dividing the vote on the right.

Just as Fidesz faces a challenge to its base from Jobbik, the Unity Alliance is challenged by a party called Politics Can be Different (LMP) that provides an alternative for its voters as well. In the last year, LMP – a small party to begin with – split so that one fraction joined the broader opposition alliance and the rest remained unaligned. While LMP lost support since the split, it still seems to be polling around the 5% threshold needed for a single party to enter the parliament.

Though Fidesz and the Unity Alliance are the two big parties in this race, polling data show that the largest single voting bloc – a clear majority of the electorate for the last several years – is still “undecided.” That large number becomes even more formidable when one considers that more than half of the Hungarians asked do not answer surveys. Is it hard to know if those who do not answer are still engaged in politics at all, and if so, how.

In past Hungarian elections, the turnout had to reach 50% for the election to be valid. But Fidesz changed that rule too so that there is no minimum turnout required any longer. Low voter turnout, then, is no barrier to a valid election.

But even with the large number undecided or apolitical voters, the results are not in doubt. The governing party designed the system precisely to prevent surprises in this particular political landscape, and they wrote the rules to allow themselves to win almost no matter which way opinion breaks and almost no matter what the turnout is on election day. It is hard to see a realistic outcome for this election that doesn’t put Fidesz front and center in the next government. Fidesz will thrive if there is low turnout because the party has a powerful system for bringing out its voters. If Jobbik surges, Jobbik could not govern unless Fidesz were the dominant partner in a coalition. But, perhaps most importantly for judging the fairness of the election, Fidesz will win even if the “democratic opposition” were to pull ahead of them by a substantial margin.

Why is that? According to election experts, the Unity Alliance could only gain a parliamentary majority if it won by more than a comfortable margin in the popular vote. That is because of the way that the system has been designed. Unless there is swing toward the left that is larger than anything we have seen in the post-communist period or unless Jobbik’s support rises by so much that it substantially depletes the Fidesz vote, Fidesz will surely win outright and is very likely to get its two-thirds back again.

How could Fidesz win under almost any likely scenario for 6 April? I will turn to that next.

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andy - Machiavelli is Back Again!
Guest

I’ll believe Putin pulling back from Crimea when I see it…
Perhaps he weighed the pros and cons of his belligerence and decided to put his expansionist strategy on hold.

The Russian offensive attempt was a reminder that being pals with with a lion is not such a good idea… (Orban: take note!)

Devilish Orban’s lack of any criticism of Mr Putin’s aggressive action laid bare our own Orban’s true motivation!

Everything points to the fact that Orban’s motivation is NOT Hungary’s safety and long-term welfare but the WEALTH of his coterie of Oligarchs.

Orban’s disregard for human democratic rights, as described in Prof. Scheppele’s article regarding the advance rigging of the framework and modus operandi of the upcoming elections.

The story of the manipulation of the criteria of theses upcoming elections may become a historic best-seller that will make Orban the Devil vie with the likes of none less than Machiavelli himself.

Ovidiu
Guest

@Eva –“So, it seems that Viktor Orbán eventually had to conform to the position held by the United States and the European Union. It must have been a bitter pill to swallow.”

The bad times for Orban are just about to start, assuming that he wins these elections.

Kozmodem
Guest
Member

OT: 200,000,000 forints or 644,000 Euros left on the Retirement Investment Account for the Hungarian retirees. As we all remember the government nationalized all private retirement savings.
In November 2013 there was still 16,000,000,000 forints there or 51,520,000 Euros.
In December there was only 200,000,000 forints.

Can you recall the MOL story about buying the Hungarian bonds in December, then selling them in January in order to show how great the Hungarian economy is? I assume the retirement money served the same purpose. Maybe the January numbers are back at the November figures.

I think Orban and Matolcsy truly bankrupted Hungary. I am blot even sure if it would be a good thing for the opposition to win this election. I think the only way to show the Fidesz fanatics what is the Orban government is doing if they get the next term. There is no money left.

http://www.origo.hu/gazdasag/20140304-elfogyott-a-nyugdijvagyon.html
http://akk.hu//kepek/upload/2014/NYRA_pf_honlapra_20131231.pdf

petofi
Guest

“So, it seems that Viktor Orbán eventually had to conform to the position held by the United States and the European Union. It must have been a bitter pill to swallow.”

I suppose the operative in the above is ‘seems’. And the part about ‘bitter pill’ is just some
typical Orbanic ‘smoke and mirrors’; it might even have been ‘vetted’ words from Moscow central. One could even surmise that it’s been decided that Orban and Hungary ought to mole underground for the time being. This whole ‘conformity to EU’ seems to have been too long in coming and smacks of insincerity (Who can believe a foreign minister with a pink tie?)

Pavel Morozov
Guest
Some1, you seriously underestimate the length until which Orban could survive economically. Or any dictator could, for that matter. I mean how many times have we heard that North-Korea’s or Iran’s (not even a dictatorship) economy is now really on the verge of collapse, inflation is rampant or whatever. No, they are still there. Granted, Orban dares to do things (further nationalizations and appropriations, state set prices, commanding economic players via security forces like in Venezuela) which the Hungarian opposition would not even contemplate, but perhaps more importantly the opposition does not even have the same fanatical, no-matter-what support, the political capital which would be necessary to carry out such actions. Fidesz has that kind of support and there is literally nothing Orban would not do to to keep power. Venezuela’s economic situation is a good example. Maduro may sooner or later go, but he is still in power even though already three years ago you could not buy good enough detergent or fresh milk, at least not every day and everywhere (and Chavez was reelected despite that) and the murder rate has been consistently higher than in Bagdad in 2004. In fact people may still democratically support Chavez’ successor… Read more »
Neville Chamberlain
Guest

Mr Orban is fair and decent chap and I have a firm commitment from him that he has not made any secret pacts with President Putin regarding Hungary reclaiming any territories lost as a result of the Treaty Of Trianon.

Pavel Morozov
Guest
Some1, one more thing. About the EU subsidies actually supporting Orban. In the US, economists long ago proved beyond any doubt that food stamps work like cash. It is in practice the same as giving cash to people. It is just politically more acceptable to give stamps then cash. Opposition people would say that taxpayer’s money is spent on drugs or booze and we have to prevent that. Since all people have some money to begin with and they anyway would have to eat, stamp recipients now just use the stamps for eating and use their cash (which they used to buy food until now) to purchase booze. And of course a black market of food stamps quickly develops. Anyway, the point is that EU subsidies although theoretically are for rural, regional development actually enable the government to free funds from the general budget which without the EU funding the state (taxpayers) would have had to provide. For example Hungary right now does not finance any investments at all. Well, there will be the giant Városliget Museum project and there have been the stadiums too, but practically all schools, roads, water treatment facilities etc. are currently financed from EU funds.… Read more »
Member

@Pavel Morozov I certainly agree with your comment #8. It always puzzles me why after all this time the EU does not cut off the funding even though they are constantly investigate. I linked in previous posts factual documents that are in front of the EU about the current Hungarian EU money distribution concerns. Yes, the EU does add to the problem. I also agree with your observation on how simply put “Orban robs Peter to pay Pal”.

Istvan
Guest
Eva your post indicates that the EU and US are operating from a shared perspective in relation to the Russian invasion of the Ukraine. I think there is agreement that the invasion was an illegal act and the sovereignty of the Ukraine was violated, but not much more. Moreover within NATO and the EU itself there appear to be all sorts of disagreements. The biggest and most frightening disagreement is over the character of Putin’s Russia. Germany in particular still is clinging to the illusion that trade with the west will drive wealth creation in Russia which will bring with it the possibility of democratic reforms. In Germany’s case the illusion is economically self serving. I would say in the US there is a profound turn against engagement with Russia. Putin so disrespected President Obama and his authority that we are now entering into a new Cold War situation. Our problem as a nation is the EU and NATO will not spend the money necessary to militarily turn back an aggressive Russia and the US can’t pick up the tab. So Orban’s position isn’t totally unique in relation to Russia, but at least the Germans plan on making money on… Read more »
USA stupidity, arrogance
Guest
USA stupidity, arrogance
“Putin so disrespected President Obama and his authority that we are now entering into a new Cold War situation.” The arrogance and stupidity of USA. Obama has no authority. No authority to order Russia around like a puppet monkey. Obama may cry and cry and cry that he was “disrespected” but he still has no authority over Russia. It is an extreme insult to even think this way, and act this way as Obama has done, it can be said that he provoked Russia by his arrogance, stupidity and threats. About 1 million newspaper articles were written about the chnance of civil war in Ukraine. Civil war has many death. Should Russia wait until 500 000 Russians are dead in civil war? Until 200 000 Russians are dead? Why should Russia not show that there will be no civil war. There will be no killing of Russians, not even 30 000 (10 times WTC 911), which is really low for civil war. Russia did nothing else but show that there will be no killing of Russians no mass murder and no civil war. There are 20 million Russians in Ukraine and Russia will not allow them to be killed in… Read more »
Bowen
Guest

A little quantitative analysis reveals that there are virtually no opposition (i.e. Unity) signs on the Kiskorut in Budapest. There were Unity posters (A3,stapled to makeshift chipboard panels attached to lamp posts, at ground level) but I noticed yesterday morning that these had started to be ripped off, and the street cleaners were removing them from the floor. Today, I counted precisely one Unity sign which remained intact on its board and hadn’t been removed, slashed or defaced. This last remaining sign just so happened to be opposite the Dohany utca Synagogue, which is constantly police-patrolled.

Meanwhile, the faces of Antal Rogan and Rónaszékiné Keresztes Monika gaze down from virtually every single billboard or advertising column. True, some of them have had little stickers added (about Paks or Azerbaijan, for instance), but this would seem to be the work of ad-hoc grassroots counter-campaigning, rather than an orchestrated effort. Oh, and there are also large signs now, advertising a special March 15 event at the Museum, with special guest speaker Orban Viktor.

LwiiH
Guest
USA stupidity, arrogance : “Putin so disrespected President Obama and his authority that we are now entering into a new Cold War situation.” The arrogance and stupidity of USA. Obama has no authority. No authority to order Russia around like a puppet monkey. Obama may cry and cry and cry that he was “disrespected” but he still has no authority over Russia. It is an extreme insult to even think this way, and act this way as Obama has done, it can be said that he provoked Russia by his arrogance, stupidity and threats. About 1 million newspaper articles were written about the chnance of civil war in Ukraine. Civil war has many death. Should Russia wait until 500 000 Russians are dead in civil war? Until 200 000 Russians are dead? Why should Russia not show that there will be no civil war. There will be no killing of Russians, not even 30 000 (10 times WTC 911), which is really low for civil war. Russia did nothing else but show that there will be no killing of Russians no mass murder and no civil war. There are 20 million Russians in Ukraine and Russia will not allow them… Read more »
andy :-)
Guest

Related Cartoon by MATT (from the Daily Telegraph)

comment image

I. A. Hlestakov
Guest
This argumentation is entirely false. Your “Russians” are Ukrainian citizens, period. Russia as a state has got nothing to do with the citizens of other countries. In addition, Russia has no objective way to distinguish between “ethnic Russians” and “ethnic Ukrainians speaking Russian as their mother tongue”, but even if so what would be the legal basis of a most blatant intervention in the internal affairs of a sovereign state (Ukraine) — to use an argument Russia likes to use? This argument is just one on the list of pretexts Russia will employ in this and coming invasions. After all, it has quite an experience already, Budapest, Prague, Afganistan, Chechnia, Georgia and now Ukraine. “Russia will protect the Russian minority” (I wonder if Russia would allow the Turkish Government to protect the Crimean Tatars or the Chinese Government the thousands of han people living in Siberia)? or “Russia will only give military assistance to President Yanukovich who called the Russian army in” etc. Just because the US was breaching international law does not make Russia’s breach any legal. Russia remains an aggressor and a bully even if it can get away with it. USA stupidity, arrogance : “Putin so disrespected… Read more »
Twerk
Guest

Istvan Kocsis, probably one of the most corrupt people of the Hungarian elite, and probably a silovik, was instrumental in the Paks-deal. Just so we know.

These people will not let Paks 2 get, any such hope is totally misguided.

http://index.hu/gazdasag/energia/2014/03/05/paks_kocsis/

GW
Guest
Twerk wrote: “Istvan Kocsis, probably one of the most corrupt people of the Hungarian elite…: The opposition has got to hammer in the fact, that while there has been corruption in the past, the level of corruption in the present government dwarfs everything before it by several orders of magnitude: the MOL deal, the Paks deal, confiscating and emptying the private retirement accounts, long-term land leases, tobacco concessions, regulation and taxation legislation built around advantages for Fidesz clients, temporary bond purchases to doctor government books, rapid construction without open planning or bidding of soccer stadiums everywhere, benefiting mostly only the private owners of these clubs, etc,, We’re talking billions of Euros worth of corruption, while the worst case of corruption that Fidesz can claim for the previous government was for a land/casino deal that could only have meant an advantage of a few million, but probably a much larger than that regular return to the state in the form of taxes, and even then, the deal never got done! Al of these Fidesz deals are done deals; the money is gone and will not be seen again by the Hungarian people to whom it all rightly belongs. When the Fidesz… Read more »
Bowen
Guest

Hmm. Now, if you want to see something egregious … and if this doesn’t make you angry, then nothing will.

Ferenc Kumin takes a photo of some advertising space in Budapest. Empty advertising space. And demonstrates that there is lots of empty ad space available in Budapest, if only the opposition would take the opportunity to use it …

http://ferenckumin.tumblr.com/post/78626171279/journalism-lite-at-the-new-york-times

Mr. Paul
Guest
Bowen : Hmm. Now, if you want to see something egregious … and if this doesn’t make you angry, then nothing will. http://ferenckumin.tumblr.com/post/78626171279/journalism-lite-at-the-new-york-times I read the article that you linked first, so I thought you are angry at the NYT using a contributor from Népszabadság, because it is owned in a significant part by the Socialist party. But now I see that your problem is the empty ad space? I think the problem is entirely different. Take for example this recent blog posting, the part which quotes the poll numbers in the form of a picture. At glance it can be seen that according to polls the numbers are not close at all. The Left-Liberal opposition was lagging behind even before corruption scandals took their toll like the Simon case. When these polls are seen (and spread around on the internet) it demotivates the wealthy donors who could give to the Socialist campaign. Some wealthy people in the US could give 10 billion forints and not even feel it. To them it would be a drop in the bucket but it would have a huge impact on a small election such as in Hungary. The problem comes when the difference… Read more »
Bowen
Guest

@ Mr Paul. You are the same PR team who writes Ferenc Kumin’s posts.Do I win a prize for guessing correctly?

Marcel Dé (@MarcelD10)
Guest

From Modern Hatreds: The Symbolic Politics of Ethnic War by Stuart Kaufman.

A Beginner’s Guide to Ethnic Politics

1. If an area was ours for 500 years and yours for 50 years, it should belong to us – your are merely occupiers.

2. If an area was yours for 500 years and ours for 50 years, it should belong to us – borders must not be changed.

3. If an area belonged to us 500 years ago but never since then, it should belong to us – it is the Cradle of our Nation.

4. If a majority of our people live there, it must belong to us – they must enjoy the right of self-determination.

5. If a minority of our people live there, it must belong to us – they must be protected against your oppression.

6. All of the above rules apply to us but not to you.

7. Our dream of greatness is Historical Necessity, yours is Fascism.

Guest

@Marcel, thanks!

We Schwabs have a shorter version of this.

Was Dein ist, ist auch mein – und was mein ist, geht Dich einen Scheißdreck an …

Loosely translated.

What’s yours is also mine – and what’s mine is none of your business at all!

Mr. Paul
Guest

Bowen you do not win anything but you can perhaps answer. What was so revolting to you in that post? I assumed it was the lack of money for the opposition hence they can’t hire any people to put posters on that empty slot. This is why I started to write about the money issue of the opposition. If the poll numbers were closer donors would be more motivated to give massive amounts and not see it as a waste. But maybe I was wrong and it was something else that you wrote about ” if this doesn’t make you angry, nothing will” what was it then?

Mr. Paul
Guest

Just out curiousity, what was the part in the above that you considered “whitewashing the Orban government”?

Member

Eva S. Balogh :
It is amazing to see a Hungarian standing up for Putin’s Russia against the United States. How low some Hungarians sank!!!

I think you misunderstood. S/he is not protecting Russia, but Orban’s interests. Somehow they must justify why going strong with the Hungarian – Soviet (I mean Russian)friendship has any merit.

Member

Bowen :
Hmm. Now, if you want to see something egregious … and if this doesn’t make you angry, then nothing will.
Ferenc Kumin takes a photo of some advertising space in Budapest. Empty advertising space. And demonstrates that there is lots of empty ad space available in Budapest, if only the opposition would take the opportunity to use it …
http://ferenckumin.tumblr.com/post/78626171279/journalism-lite-at-the-new-york-times

It does not happen to often that I cannot recall a movie’s title, but I can’t.
So there was this movie, and in it was campaign, where the “assistants'” job was to get ahead each time to show up in front of the camera as the camera was moving, so you felt that the route is very crowded, and there are thousands of signs. They were running in circles.
I wonder when they put up the empty board for Kumin? If its a free advertising space, why there are no Fidesz’ posters are on it either? (Potemkin Village a’la Orban)

Member
Mr. Paul: So you are suggesting that the campaign of the opposition should be financed form the USA? Isn’t your Fidesz government and Jobbik who cries even if a fly poop lands from the sky on Fidesz that its must be a drone, financed by the mysterious powers? Isn’t Fidesz the one (with Matolcsy and Orban) that cannot get over implementing the idea of the foreign attacks against the Hungarian government? Is Fidesz so desperate now that they need some firm ground to prove that they were right all along? Of course there will be no millions coming from the “Jews, USA, secret agents”, there were no millions ever came, and were never any secret attacks, except in the imagination of the Fidesz. Of course Orban has all the money for his campaign too, he robbed the retirement founds blind next to other things and paid for every Fidesz achievements from the money of the EU. His friends finance him dearly too, as he gives them their bread and butter. Look at you, how desperately you are trying to protect him against all facts and logics. It is so obvious that you fall into from the two categories of “will… Read more »
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