Jobbik won the by-election in Tapolca

Although I watched two political commentators’ analyses of the results of the Tapolca-Ajka-Sümeg election, my reactions here are only first impressions. Perhaps my greatest surprise was the relatively strong showing of Zoltán Fenyvesi, the Fidesz candidate, who, as things now stand, lost the election by only 261 votes out of approximately 30,000 votes cast. It was also something of a surprise how poorly the socialist Ferenc Pad did, although after seeing the candidates debate last Friday I strongly suspected that it would not be the MSZP-DK candidate who would win this election.

According to the official statistics, Lajos Rig (Jobbik) received 35.27%, Zoltán Fenyvesi (Fidesz) 34.38%, Ferenc Pad (MSZP-DK) 26.27%, and Barbara Sallee (LMP) 2.05% of the votes. As the votes were coming in, it was apparent that voter turnout in Tapolca, a Jobbik stronghold, was higher than in Ajka, where MSZP is the dominant party.

Jobbik took this election very seriously. For example, Gábor Vona, the party chairman, moved to Tapolca for a good two weeks and campaigned all day long. Although about 600 MSZP activists descended on the electoral district, they campaigned only in the last two days. That is not an effective way to campaign. By point of comparison, on May 6–I know it’s an odd date–the town in which I live will have local elections, and the campaign is already on. In fact, half an hour ago two Republican activists appeared at the door with a complimentary copy of the local service directory and a flyer touting the party’s accomplishments in 2014 and its plans for 2015. I assume the Democrats will follow soon enough, although they usually arrive empty-handed.

Lajos Rig campaigned to the last minute / Origo/ Photo Attila Polyák

Lajos Rig campaigned to the last minute / Origo/ Photo Attila Polyák

People familiar with modern campaign techniques increasingly comment on the inability of the left-of-center parties to wage an effective campaign. Fidesz was a pioneer in the field by borrowing the American practice of door-to-door campaigning. What they also borrowed was something that according to Hungarian law is illegal: keeping lists of potential supporters. MSZP, by not following in Fidesz’s footsteps, lost the “campaign game” some time ago.

Of course, lists are not enough if prospective supporters don’t actually go to the polls, and in the last year or so Fidesz hasn’t managed to get out the vote. Admittedly, turnout in by-elections is usually low. This time only 41.6% of the eligible voters cast their votes, as opposed to 59.9% a year ago. A large number of Fidesz and MSZP voters stayed away, while Jobbik, which got 10,110 votes or 23.49% in 2014, got 10, 354 votes or 35.27% this time around. I guess we will have to wait a bit for a deeper analysis of the figures to find out where the Jobbik votes came from. The detailed data from all the towns and villages should give us some answers.

As I said, I watched the three candidates debate on Friday’s Egyenes beszéd (Straight Talk) on ATV. You may recall that in an earlier post I reported that the Fidesz candidate had initially been ready to participate in a debate scheduled for Thursday but in the last minute he retreated and the event was cancelled. The Fidesz leadership then changed its mind and agreed to a debate, which was broadcast on Friday. I guess they decided that avoiding a face-to-face meeting with their adversaries would give the impression that the party was afraid of its opponents.

Watching the three candidates was an interesting experience. First of all, Lajos Rig, the Jobbik candidate whom I had seen only once before, on a video where reporters confronted him about his tattoo, made a better impression than I expected. On the earlier video he handled the situation very badly and came across as not too bright and painfully inarticulate. This time, by contrast, he was well-spoken. He was also quite aggressive. For example, he was the first candidate to respond to the reporter’s initial question. No hesitation, his message was clear and intelligent.

Zoltán Fenyvesi was too much of a government candidate. His answers sounded as if they had been written by the official spokesman of the party. Given Viktor Orbán’s problems, Fenyvesi might have positioned himself as just a bit more independent. He did, however, deliver the only “where’s the beef” message to the electorate: “If you vote for me, the district will get favorable treatment from the government.” It’s possible that this message resonated with some of the voters. I should, in passing, point out another negative in his debate performance, which probably made no difference in the outcome of the election. He claimed that he met all the mayors of the 60 towns and villages in the district. This claim turned out to be untrue.

Ferenc Pad is soft-spoken and mild-mannered. In the free-wheeling conversation he was usually the last to speak on any given subject. He may have been a successful trade union leader, but I doubt that he was the best choice for a political candidate. Moreover, even though we heard how hard he and his team worked and that he visited every village in the district, it’s difficult to assess how effective all this effort was. I got the impression that on a typical day in the campaign the candidate would arrive alone in a village and settle down in the pub where he would talk to the customers. And that he would strike up conversations with passers-by. That’s not a winning strategy in the twenty-first century.

After today’s election Fidesz will have to pay more attention to the party to its right. Until very recently the Fidesz leadership didn’t seem to be worried about Jobbik. In fact, they often adopted Jobbik’s ideas and presented them as their own, hoping to attract Jobbik voters to their party. It was only about a week ago that Zoltán Balog and János Lázár began referring to Jobbik as a “Nazi party.”  It will be interesting to see what Fidesz comes up in this new situation.

As for MSZP, finishing third in this election most likely won’t help the party find a way out of its present morass. MSZP’s popularity hasn’t moved up one whit since the last election. DK is slowly edging up in the polls, and I suspect that at the moment the DK leadership is not at all happy that they decided to support MSZP’s choice. Whether this defeat will have an effect on future cooperation between these two parties remains to be seen.

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piroskamarkus
Guest

Tragic day

tappanch
Guest

Hungary, 70 years after liberation

[Fradi fans outside their new stadium on April 12, 2015 ]
comment image

Member

The t-shirt says: “Fans without civil rights”. Wtf?

Webber
Guest

Just to go to a match these days, before you can buy a ticket you have to purchase a “fan card.” This is a one-time purchase, and enables you to buy tickets from then on. Part of the “fan card” is biometric. When a fan goes into the stadium his/her veins are scanned, and the card confirms whether he/she is the cardholder. If someone is banned from matches for foul behaviour, obviously this makes it easier to catch them at the gate.
Apparently some clubs aren’t using the vein scanners. Fradi is.
Fradi fans say this is a violation of their rights, and many of them are unwilling to go to the stadium – instead they watch matches on large-screen t.v. in public places. Yesterday some of them got a little violent (threw bottles of beer and other objects at policemen).

Rikard
Guest

http://youtu.be/Ik4VJ9eIots

A little ‘spirited conversation’ I found. People are really into the issues of the day.

And taking a look at fashion I think I’ve been out if it. That t shirt at 2:27 just doesn’t look to inviting for the law either. Nothing like using ‘freedom’ to tell it like it they want to. Surprised a guy like that can ‘model’ over there like that..;-)…

Member

Oh well. We have now an MP with ThebSS motto (Meine ehre heisst treue) tattooed on his arm. 21st century Hungary. It’s unbelieveble what can be sold to the Hungarian public – the guy said the tattoo was for his wife when they got married (honor is my loyalty). The rest is coincidence.

Thank you Viktor Orban. Now we see what price we will pay for the Fidesz era. The brownshirts are coming.

Zepac
Guest

Fasisztak es nacik egyutt 69%-ot kaptak. Ez nagyjabol a szokasos. Folytatodik a csuszas a nacik fele.

exTor
Guest

For just under 70% of the voting electorate to have cast votes for either of the two right-wing parties does indeed seem scary, however I dont think that I would classify most of the voters as ‘nazis’, the bulk of Jobbikers notwithstanding.

The reality is that there is a big divide amongst the voters and on the far side of that chasm exists the rump of the left, which carries much baggage (eg: Gyurcsány, etal). The political reality that is Jobbik must be hammered incessantly to claw back those blinded by that blight.

MAGYARKOZÓ

buddy
Guest

Sorry but it’s not possible that “just under 70% of the voting electorate to have cast votes for either of the two right-wing parties” because the turnout was 41.6%.

So if my math is correct, then 29% of the voting electorate voted right-wing, not 70%.

exTor
Guest

The ‘voting electorate’ refers to those who actually voted, buddy. You are confusing that group (which I correctly identified) with the electorate that is eligible to vote. You are correct in having pointed out that fewer than half bothered to vote (for whatever reason).

My comment stands, namely almost 70% of those who actually voted opted for the Right. Whether 70% of the eligible-to-vote electorate would also choose the Right is open to debate.

MAGYARKOZÓ

buddy
Guest

Sorry again but your definition of “voting electorate” is not correct. Just have a look at this chart for example:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_in_Singapore#2011_general_election

You’ll see that approx. 88% of the population cast a vote, and 12% did not vote, yet they list the “Total Voting Electorate” (the total number of people eligible to vote) as 100%.

buddy
Guest

Incidentally, I have never in my life heard the word “electorate” used to refer to “those who actually voted.” It always refers in some way to those eligible to vote, whether they exercise that right or not.

exTor
Guest

I think that I owe you a semiapology. I believe that I was semimistaken.

My Mac’s Dictionary app says that an ‘electorate’ comprises all “who are entitled to vote”, which is what you said. Wikipedia goes further:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_turnout
To me, ‘voter turnout’ = ‘voting electorate’

Interestingly, buddy, your earlier Singapore link seemingly produces a contradiction, which I did not catch on the first goround.

What the SED calls the ‘voting electorate’ is either a tautology –’widow woman’ is an example of a tautology– or it’s a contradiction in terms.

Using the SED’s terminology, the tally for the ‘voting electorate’ is always 100%, however that tally includes nonvoters, which contradicts ‘voting’.

My earlier statement is still true:
‘voting electorate’ ≤ ‘(eligible) electorate’

Whew! Esoteric or what?

MAGYARKOZÓ

exTor
Guest

Point taken, buddy.

I didn’t want to go here, because I’ve almost maxed my allotted number of HS posts. … (–:

I must, however, correct your correction.

The Singapore Elections Department choses to use ‘voting electorate’ as such, and it is certainly comprehensible, however its usage is fundamentally flawed.

If a ‘running person’ is one who actually is running, not someone who can run at some point (or maybe never), a ‘voting electorate’ is a group that is actually voting, not a group that comprises individuals who can vote.

The key to using ‘voting’, which is a present participle, is the actual doing of the action that the verb ‘vote’ denotes. The logic of the term ‘voting electorate’ means that that term applies only to those individuals who have exed their ballots. For the SED, the more appropriate term would have been ‘eligible electorate’.

The ‘voting electorate’ is necessarily a subset of the ‘eligible electorate’.

Second lesson: Just because someone in a position of power, knowledge, whatever says something, that does not make that utterance automatically correct. Bureaucrats (and others) make mistakes all the time.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Member

It was not unexpected.

petofi
Guest

Anyone who thinks that the ‘thief of Baghdad’ (or, the creator of 700,000 votes) could not manufacture 262 votes if he wished…still has no inkling of the game Orban is playing.

Tyrker
Guest

This election was clearly Rigged.

Ron
Guest

All elections in Hungary are clearly rigged, or better gerrymandered.

http://hungarianspectrum.org/2011/11/26/the-verdict-the-new-hungarian-electoral-law-is-not-democratic/

Ron
Guest

We can blame Mszp/DK, Jobbik, but the real culprit is Fidesz. I finally found this study Gordan Bajnai with his foundation Haza es Haladas madwe back in 2012. Eva had a topic on this as well. The gerrymandering was set-up in such as way either Jobbik or Fidesz could win this election (the conclusion of this report).

The study:
http://hazaeshaladas.blog.hu/2012/08/16/atbillenteni_visszaszerezni_meghoditani

Older post from Eva on this topic:
http://hungarianspectrum.org/2012/08/18/a-statistical-analysis-of-individual-voting-districts-by-gordon-bajnais-foundation/

Member

Haha. Good one …

gator
Guest
Let’s remember that in 2002 and 2006 MSZP and Fidesz both received some 40-42% and MSZP had SZDSZ on its side which got in with over 5% which decided the races toward MSZP. This status quo was fundamentally upended in 2010 by which time Jobbik grew up and the liberals disappeared. Now, 5 years after Fidesz started to methodically destruct Hungary and the leftist/liberal political base Fidesz is still at 36% while the combined left wing is at 25-27%. This means Fidesz is extremely resilient while the left wing is still extremely anemic. Meanwhile Jobbik grew up and is seen as the main contender, The challenger to Fidesz. In a first-past the post system this is an essential position because perceived third parties are disregarded as a matter of strategy. There is no left-wing challenger partly because the left-wing only exists in the minds of left-wingers and analysts, voters only see a constantly quarreling bunch of 5-8 parties uniformly lacking ideas and leadership. Besides the fact that MSZP is hopeless in rural areas, MSZP also chose a bad candidate. Pad may be a good municupal councilman but he was a bland szoci in a time when people clearly demanded a… Read more »
Morningstar
Guest

I think the loss of MSZP is too great to be explained away by Pad Ferenc being a weak candidate. It is probably more fundamental than that, getting 26% is not enough for anything.

In this district Fidesz and Jobbik got around 35% each with Jobbik winning by a few votes, but not every district will be so ideal from the MSZP point of view. To become a party with any significance MSZP has to come out from the 20- something range and get into the 40% range. And even then because so many of the MSZP vote is centered around Budapest it will be hard, but 20-something percent is only enough for a complete defeat.

It is not likely that Ferenc Gyurcsany’s attack on MSZP for corruption decided anything but it perhaps signals something. Some even on the left do not want MSZP to succeed, to win.

Gepida
Guest
Agree. Tapolca is by far not the most reliably right-wing district in Hungary. A victory or a close to victory situation would have been a must. Note also that Ajka had twice as many voters as Tapolca and even in Ajka Ferenc Pad won by a much lower percentage that his competitors won in Tapolca or in the surrounding small villages. Thus Pad wasn’t even too popular on his home turf. MSZP has many problems. The entire left-wing is in a death spiral. No young, ambitious, disciplined person wants to associate his/her “clean” name with MSZP or even with the left-wing. It could taint a CV, which is dangerous. The current leftists are either young clueless urban hipsters (at Együtt or PM) or middle aged to older generation grey socialist types with no message. The problem is age-old. The leftist are always more tolerant so if you are publicly right-wing you don’t suffer under a left-wing government but if you are openly left-wing you are a target under a right wing government. Since it looks as if Fidesz and Jobbik will rule together for many years it’s not a good insurance policy in rural regions to come out or associate… Read more »
exTor
Guest
The three prevous pieces (by gator, Morningstar, Gepida) were excellent in their deliveries. In the final paragraph, gator paints a disconnect between rural voters and the Left. Accordingly, the top issues of the Left are viewed as marginal by rural voters. Concentrating on human-rights issues (such as combating antisemitism and antiRomaism) gets no traction in the countryside. Maybe the outlook “Orbán won, the left is finished.” is currently valid, however party fortunes ebb and flow. Orbán knows that, which is why he put an extra effort campaigning in Tapolca. He will likely take some solace knowing that Fidesz was within a hair of beating Jobbik. In some respects, coming a close second was a measured victory for Viktor. Salient is Morningstar’s point that “Gyurcsány’s attack on MSZP for corruption … perhaps signals something.” Maybe this is the start of some MSZP housecleaning, sweeping away the detritus of the pre1990 regime. Gepida also portrays rural areas as no-man’s lands for the Left. Well, that’s the way it is in most places around the world. The US (as Éva will tell you) is like that: conservative in the west. So is Canada, where I’m from. Stephen Harper (who reminds me a bit… Read more »
exTor
Guest
Contrary to a thought expressed herein, this byelection was not ‘rigged’. Votes exist all along the political spectrum and those votes were tapped. This is what that tapping looks like: Jobbik … 35.3% … up 11.8 points Fidesz … 34.4% … down 8.8 points MSZP … 26.3% … down 1.1 points The Fidesz drop was a given, or perhaps was thought to be a given, however (as Éva pointed out) the Fidesz candidate did better than expected. What is salient is that MSZP should have done better. Since Fidesz is politically situated between MSZP and Jobbik, disaffected Fideszers would move left or right with their current votes, yet MSZP did not seem to catch much of the fallout, which went right. It would be too blanket of a statement to say that the Jobbik mentality predominates the countryside, as opposed to a more liberal mindset in the bigger cities. What is true, however, is that the pull of Jobbik also exists in Budapest. Gábor Vona reminds me of nobody else than that Louisiana nosejob nazi, David Duke, who went to great lengths to prettify himself and his politics in order to seem less odious to the voters. The message of… Read more »
Webber
Guest

“Rigged” was clearly a play on words As in Lajos Rig(ged it).

exTor
Guest

I oopsed that one. Hadn’t paid attention to the big ‘R’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

petofi
Guest

The Master Magician blinds with his brilliance.
With a steady hand, he directs the rotting barque of Hungary onto the rocks.

Kormos
Guest

…and you are sitiing on it. Good luck!

Webber
Guest

The winner of the elections at Tapolca, Rig, has repeatedly expressed revolting views on FB, including the idea that Roma are being used by Jews as “a biological weapon” against Christian Hungarians, and that the 9/11 attacks were faked by the US govt.
Those who speak Hungarian can see for themselves, here:
http://kettosmerce.blog.hu/2015/02/14/vona_gabornak_igaza_van_beszeljunk_rig_lajosrol

Nameofthe
Guest
You are right, but voters are unfortunately beyond these things and so are happy to overlook such weaknesses (plus not everybody is on facebook). Also in the 1940’s not all Hungarians wanted explicitly the killing of the jews, most just didn’t care or were happy with it — but they sure felt oppressed (poor) compared to rich people (jewish entrepreneurs) and felt deeply humiliated by the world (Trianon). There was no left wing (other than the illegal communists who were thought of as a jewish bunch since 1919) and the “traditional” right wing of Horthy could not deliver. In a way this is how many people feel now too: poor (but entitled to more) and humiliated by foreign capital and foreign power (whereas they feel Hungary is entitled to a status of power and thus of respect — Orban feels this instinctively). The left-wing cannot deal with any of these issues because it’s too rational and timid. People need to feel proud (look at the current China or Japan) and with the left-wing they can only have bad conscience (for 1944 for example) and also need to feel that they could be richer. The left promises more EU and more… Read more »
exTor
Guest

It’s clear that Lajos Rig is a scumbag of the highest (lowest ???) order. I wonder if he, in the runup to the election, attempted to repudiate his most odorous opinions? Would those who had voted for him still have done so had they themselves been Internet-savvy, been aware of how to access online commentary? I’m glad that Webber made me aware of Rig’s dysformed thoughts. Is Rig the worst of the worse amongst Jobbikers, or are there more where that scuzzbucket comes from?

MAGYARKOZÓ

Rob
Guest
Jobbik did win the Tapolca election, this much is true. But the election was very close, they won by less than 1% difference. If there were polls showing the numbers before the election voters could do strategic voting. This raises an interesting question: even a small group of determined MSZP voters could prevent the Jobbik win if they vote for Fidesz. Of course most would not be able to, but all was needed was a few hundred votes to prevent the Jobbik victory (assuming that is something they would want to prevent). When elections are this close even a few votes can mean the difference. I have the feeling that most MSZP voters have a secondary preference for Jobbik over Fidesz. Some of them even celebrated Jobbik’s win on facebook and elsewhere saying that at least Fidesz lost this way. It is a very interesting dilemma : considering how close an election can be, would you (as an MSZP voter) decide between Fidesz and Jobbik and how so, assuming polls show MSZP has no chance. In a French type second round election MSZP wouldn’t even be on the ballot so then the problem would be even more pronounced. I don’t… Read more »
exTor
Guest

I can almost imagine Éva fainting (in the morning, 6 hours behind BP) reading “Balogh would vote for Jobbik to prevent a Fidesz win”. I dont know for sure exactly where Éva’s politics lie, but (given everything she’s ever written) she would heartattack at that ‘necessity’, as you posit it.

Jobbik’s voter percentage –almost 1 point higher than that of Fidesz– is a sign of many things, perhaps the most important of which is the mindset of certain segments of Hungarian society. Jobbik might still have won had more people actually voted.

Strategic voting has been employed in many locations. To me, it’s a highly cynical exercise, however it may be necessary in certain circumstances.

That some in the so-called Left (MSZPers) would cheer this Jobbik win may be understandable given the growing antipathy towards Fidesz.

Were I an MSZP supporter in Magyarország, I certainly would not have expressed my views in any way linkable to Jobbik.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest

“I believe the author of this blog Eva Balogh would vote for Jobbik to prevent a Fidesz win”
Obviously you don’t read this blog much. There is no way that could even occur to anyone who does.

Gallo gallo
Guest

The “mutyi” (corrupt backroom deal) between Fidesz and MSZP continues as usual.

Why am I not surprised that people don’t want the corrupt szocis ie, the Socialists back in power — just the faux-affectionate term “szoci” derived from socialist implies this tendency of the socialists to deal with anybody in the hope of some crumbles.

http://index.hu/belfold/2015/04/13/marciusban_leszavaztak_de_megint_elokerult_a_madach_teri_borsetany/

Guest

Oh my – so much interesting stuff to read up …

Just one point re Mr Rig and:
“Meine Ehre heißt Treue”
For showing this tattoo openly you could go to jail in Germany because it is acknowledged as a forbidden symbol of the SS!

Only absolute Nazis would have this …

petofi
Guest

Inspite of having created, in the Nazis, the most abominable governance in human history, Germany today has a far superior society to that of Hungary. Today, Germany has not only laws against nazi insignia and paraphernalia, but a society that has found that particular past totally unacceptable. For instance, a group such as the anti-semitic, Hungarian motorcyclists would be both outlawed, and found unacceptable by the mainstream society. If the Hungarian bikers would try to demonstrate in Berlin, I’m sure they would be hounded off the streets by ordinary citizens. Germans have moved on.

In contrast, not only does Hungarian society tolerate (neigh, is allowed to encourage and foster) anti-semitism, but it is, if not overtly, actually proud of it.

Hungarian society is mired in its own neuroses; and politicians like Orban have used that mental frailty as the basis of a ridiculous nationalism and exceptionalism.

spectator
Guest

But they would probably understand too what the hell it means, even before decided to have inked to them for permanent pleasure.

It isn’t the case with this homegrown one…

Frighteningly typical if you think about it. Sometimes I wonder, if their clothing got the hue after they’ve put it on, just to fit to their mind better.

Zsepac
Guest

It is truly amazing to me that the Left attacks Jobbik only about their human rights ideas. It would be very easy to argue (because it is true) that Jobbik would be a total economic disaster, that could easily result of the loss of all Eu investments introduction of visa obligation to Austria, and making Hungary a Russian satellite again. And Hungarian voters really would not want any of that.

Tamas99872
Guest

The Left has no ideas and no vision. You are totally right, there are so many ways to attack Jobbik (and Fidesz) but the Left can’t seem to want to attack anybody. Remember that in April 2014 (and anytime before the elections) MSZP simply refused to attack Fidesz. Leftists don’t do negative campaigns ‘cos, you see, that’s too dirty and unethical.

Leftists are fundamentally seen as apologizing for their very existence, how could people believe that they can lead a nation? In any case they don’t know what to do. It’s a riddle to me too, but they are totally impotent and apparently nothing’s gonna change that.

The Left degenerated into a motley group of human rights activists. The leftist parties just don’t act as parties. But I guess the Left will not disappear as even predators need constant fodder, that’s how the balance is maintained, so they will remain a legitimizing/impotent opposition to the Power represented by Fidesz and Jobbik. The leftists are OK with that.

buddy
Guest

What I don’t understand is why Jobbik put such little effort into their candidate for the Veszprém campaign but much more here. The two districts are practically side-by-side after all.

In any case, Ágoston Sámuel Mráz cautioned that Jobbik shouldn’t draw any nationwide conclusions from this one election, which should also be kept in mind (of course he would say that, wouldn’t he).

HiBoM
Guest
The huge advantage that Jobbik possesses is that it is not tainted by having previously governed, and that gives it much of its current appeal. I don’t really believe that “the left” is being rejected on ideological grounds. Its problem is that the MSZP is being run by the same bunch of losers who corruptly misgoverned for 8 years, Gyurcsány (who is largely despised, although i realise not on this message board) is still prominent with his party and as a result of some fairly appalling horse trading, we find not only Feri Gy in parliament, so is Fodor with his non existent party. In other words, the same cast of discredited characters who were roundly booted from office in 2010 and who are still clinging on. The good news is that it is dawning on people that Fidesz has also been corruptly misgoverning the country and has reached the point of no return. The bad news is that the only “new” party to turn to is Jobbik. If the “left” (which is basically short hand for “non Fidesz” and “non Jobbik”) was able to start from scratch and find uncompromised figures who can talk to ordinary people properly and… Read more »
thomas
Guest
“I don’t really believe that “the left” is being rejected on ideological grounds.” Don’t make the mistake of mixing up ideology and brand. People can hardly define what leftism means and Jobbik just as Fidesz has many policy ideas which may be deemed leftist. People are not against “leftist” policies, actually I think many crave them (and rightly feel abandoned by leftist parties). On the other hand left as a political brand, as a shorthand, as a community to belong to (that is if you decided to vote for a leftist party) is extremely unpopular for a host of reasons. Incurable corruption, lack of clear values and vision, lack of leadership including lack of assertive leaders and ability to appear decisive by now are all intimately associated with the term left. It is an extremely difficult job for anybody to clear the brand and it is certainly proving an impossible task for the current crop of leftist politicians (which is not surprising since they are part of the problem). I agree that perceived lack of corruption is one important reason for Jobbik’s popularity, but of course there are many other. Their grass-roots organization – just to mention one fundamental condition… Read more »
petofi
Guest

At 6%, it is clear that DK is growing. Its philosophy is clearly the only one for a modern-day, European, party. Now if Gyurcsany was a real national figure who cared for the country more than to grandstand and pontificate…he would sit down with Bajnai, Bokros, Angyan, and a few others of like ilk and say: “I will now withdraw from the leadership of this party. I have provided a possible vehicle for a party of growth. You people around this table decide the party leader. I will provide whatever assistance I can from ‘off-stage’.

Now THAT’S what a national personage would do…

gest
Guest

I just read the following on Török Gábor’s facebook page.

“A Szövetség a Nemzetért Polgári Kör alakuló ülésén 2002-ben készült képek – Orbán Viktorral és Vona Gáborral – igazán ma lettek érdekesek. Biztos mindenkinek más jut eszébe ezekről, nekem leginkább a politikusi sorsok, karrierek, utak. Párhuzamosok, keresztezők, pályák, kényszerpályák, lejtők, emelkedők. Van-e érdekesebb, elgondolkoztatóbb, drámaibb a politikánál?”

I wonder how could the young Gábor Vona at the age of 24 meet the just leaving prime minister Viktor Orban and be a member of a rather private civil circle? On wikipedia it is said that Vona was invited by Orban himself to enter the club. But why did Orban invite him in the first place, where did Orban know Vona from and why did Orban (known to be paranoid but known also to love the company of certain very reliable people) trust Vona at all? How could anybody get to to be the member of the civic circle no. 1 in which the prime minister and the Janos Martonyi was also member?

Orange Files
Guest

Összenő (majd), ami összetartozik.

Webber
Guest

That was a MIÉP slogan.

Orange Files
Guest

Which applies perfectly to what will happen, in some form, between Fidesz and Jobbik.

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