Viktor Orbán will take care of Hungary’s unwanted immigrants

As many as 900 people may have drowned in the Mediterranean a few days ago in their attempt to enter Europe as illegal immigrants. This tragedy once again focused attention on the serious refugee problem the European Union faces. Thousands of people from war-torn Iraq and Syria have been joining citizens of African countries in dangerous journeys to escape danger and poverty. The EU has been slow to respond to the problem. The extraordinary summit held on Thursday dealt exclusively with those refugees who arrive by boat–admittedly the most pressing, life-threatening problem. But Hungary also receives a large number of applications for settlement in the European Union. The would-be immigrants are largely Kosovars, Syrians, and Iraqis who opted to travel by land across the Balkan peninsula. Their final destination isn’t Hungary but countries in western Europe. Hungary is just a transit point. Nonetheless, Viktor Orbán has been trying to use the immigration issue to his own political advantage.

Orbán’s populist attitude toward immigration has received wide coverage in the press. He appeals to the basest instincts of Hungarians, whose xenophobia is well known. Hungarian commentators point out that his latest suggestions for dealing with the immigrant problem–which currently is no problem at all–echo the ideas of Jobbik. (Jobbik warmly welcomed the prime minister’s new statements about refugee seekers.) Because it is Jobbik that wants to solve all problems by force, something that Viktor Orbán now advocates himself. This way, the argument goes, he hopes to recapture those Fidesz voters who have moved over to Jobbik and to bolster his sagging popularity among the population as a whole.

What are the main features of Orbán’s ideas on immigration? First and foremost, Europe does not need immigrants at all. Second, the European Union should be sealed and defended against intruders by the army. Third, the European Union should not overreach in its immigration/refugee policies. Each country should formulate its own policies and deal with its unwanted immigrants as it best sees fit.

"We need no refugees" Gábor Pápai / Népszava

We need no refugees” Gábor Pápai / Népszava

I will come back to these topics later, but first let me turn to the government “consultation” on immigration.The government will send out eight million questionnaires to the voting-age public, in the expectation that one million will be filled out and returned. The results will be seen only by government officials, if they bother at all with the exercise. The survey asks the following twelve leading questions.

1. How important is the spread of terrorism as far as your own life is concerned?

2. In your opinion could Hungary become the target of terrorism in the next few years?

3. Do you agree that mistaken immigration policies contribute to the spread of terrorism?

4. Did you know that economic immigrants cross the border illegally and that lately their numbers have increased twentyfold?

5. Do you agree with the opinion that economic immigrants endanger the jobs and livelihoods of the Hungarian people [magyar emberek]?

6. In your opinion did Brussels’ policies on immigration and terrorism fail?

7. Would you support the government in its effort to introduce stricter immigration regulations in opposition to Brussels?

8. Would you support a new regulation that would allow the government to place immigrants who illegally entered the country into internment camps?

9. In your opinion should those immigrants who illegally enter the country be returned to their own countries in the shortest possible time?

10. Do you agree that those economic immigrants who stay in Hungary should have to work to cover the cost of their keep?

11. Do you agree that the best means of combating immigration is to give economic assistance to the countries of origin of the immigrants?

12. Do you agree with the government that instead of allocating funds to immigration we should support Hungarian families and those children yet to be born?

I don’t think that I have to comment on this “national consultation.”

Instead, I would like call attention to something that few people have touched upon. In criticizing Orbán, many commentators point to the large number of Hungarians currently working in western Europe, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Are they not “economic immigrants” in the countries where they have settled? The government’s answer is that the two cases cannot be compared. Hungary belongs to the European Union, which allows citizens of member states free movement and equal job opportunities anywhere inside the borders of the EU. Indeed, this is the case, and on this level the Hungarian government has a valid point. But let’s tackle the problem from another angle. Viktor Orbán appeals to a law that allows Hungarians the privilege of free movement. This privilege is an expression of the common will of the European Union. But now Hungary wants to be solely responsible for creating its own immigration policy that would deal with immigrants from outside of the European Union. When it is to his advantage, he appeals to the authority of the European Union, but when it looks as if he has to take joint responsibility for the immigrant issue, he refuses to cooperate.

If, by the way, Viktor Orbán thinks that immigrants from Eastern European countries are always welcomed by the population in countries of western Europe, he is very wrong. Just yesterday Austrian right-wingers demanded that the government introduce a quota system to keep Hungarians out of the country. They claim that there are enough of them as it is. And Orbán’s friend, British Prime Minister David Cameron, hasn’t shown himself to be exactly a friend of immigrants who come from the eastern periphery of the EU. In general, one can say that immigrants are unpopular, especially in economically difficult times. They are blamed for accepting jobs for less money and taking away the livelihoods of the natives. This is true now, and it was even true in countries, like Canada, where a large number of Hungarians settled in 1956.

As for the generosity of the Hungarian government, let me tell you about a Kurdish family who has lived in Hungary for the last seventeen years. The couple has three children, the oldest of whom is 18. The two younger ones were born in Hungary. Last year the office handling immigration issues refused to give the family permission to settle in Hungary. It was only two days ago that the court ordered a review of the case. The classmates of the older daughter wrote a heart-wrenching letter, pleading with the court not to expel their classmate from the country. So much for the famously Christian country.

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Minusio
Guest

The fourth pillar of the EU – free movement of people – seems to be a problem with many a European country. From a demographic and social insurance point of view, all industrialised countries need immigration. But our political personnel doesn’t bother to explain this to their peoples.

That they also fail to decide on a legal and human way to let those wanting to come to Europe in, makes me feel ashamed. This whole dilemma also shows that 60 years of development aid only aided corrupt dictators. The EU subsidises exports of less popular pieces of meat to African countries, thus destroying the meagre local markets their development aid tried to build up. It’s insane. If I weren’t so old, I would become a terrorist!

Orbán’s views are just the most weird and extreme. He is probably also the most uneducated of all European leaders – and the most corrupt. [He even doesn’t know the socially accepted form of a handkiss…]

Nowadays I hesitate to check my usual sources about Hungary. It’s all so sickening.

Peter Janos
Guest

Why does Europe need for unskilled economic refugees in the era of automatiion and robot technology? The EU must follow the USA immigration tactics: We must admit only educated people from the third world.

spectator
Guest

You may wish to distinguish “refugees” (menekültek) from “migrants” or “immigrants” (bevándolók).

You see, the word ‘refuge’ means ‘shelter from danger’, the ‘refugee’ means ‘an exile who flies for safety’.

Well, giving shelter to people in need is definitive a Human duty, moreover even a Christian one (among others, if we look at the religions).

Based on the above, indeed one should wonder, what Viktor Orbán has to do with the question at all..?

The case of ‘immigrants’ is rather different. While within the EU the freedom of movement still one of the elementary rights, letting people from other countries move to Hungary could regulated on many different ways, alas not on the basis of their education, I assume. The general rule is that the migrant should have means to support his/her living, which eventually led to work, what needs skill and/or education, but the question is far more complex than that idiotic questionnaire ever will find answer to.

The people who may answer to Viktor Orbán, nothing but a pawn in his play against Jobbik, and being treated as one as always been.

Peter Janos
Guest

You confused the economic refugees and political refugees

clarification
Guest

Peter Janos there is no such thing as an economic refugee, that’s a confounding of terms. Refugees are those who seek protection under the auspices of the 1951 Geneva convention, which Hungary signed, wrote into its laws, and therefore has a duty to uphold. Economic migrants, on the other hand, are those who are not fleeing persecution in their home countries, only seeking a better future.

Peter Janos
Guest

They are unable to fulfill the category of political refugees. They are economic refugees, who want to live in higher standard of living.

Webber
Guest

Strange comment. I’ve met a lot of poorly educated migrants in the US, including some from Hungary.

az angol beteg
Guest

you want a machine to lay bricks and pour coffee? Have you tried emigrating to the US?

Webber
Guest

Angol beteg, if your comment is to me I might stress the stunningly obvious: I have no problem with poorly educated immigrants. They are what made the US what it is, for better or worse. My ancestors, who immigrated from Ireland, England, and old Austria (a Czech) were surely poorly educated.
I haven’t tried emigrating to the US. I’m sure the process is unpleasant and some of the authorities are awful.
Have you tried emigrating to Hungary? I can tell you stories.
If your comment is not to me, then please disregard this.

Peter Janos
Guest

But your ancestors lived in the 19th century, when it was considered as normal situation. (90% of the american society had no secondary school education in the 1890s) We live in the 21th century, when these uneducated people mean only problems in the era of automation and robot technology.

Webber
Guest

Who will serve you in a restaurant, if not the poorly educated? Who will take your money at a till? Who will clean your office? Who will handle your luggage at the airport? Who will pick the strawberries you eat? I could go on, but won’t.
The United States and Canada are full of poorly educated immigrants right now too. They clean our offices, serve us in restaurants, work in our fields, and take our money at tills. Many of them speak Spanish and are direct descendants of the American continent’s original inhabitants. Some of them are Hungarian. There is one, for instance, on a silly t.v. show about a place in Las Vegas that works on cars. That Hungarian’s job is to wash the cars. His work is, apparently, much needed.

Member

Hungarian Freedom-Slighters

As Eva gently hints, it’s a good job a Canadian counterpart of Fidesz — if such a thing is conceivable at all, rather than a grotesque contradiction in terms — was not in power in Canada in 1956, otherwise tens of thousands of Hungarian refugees would not have been prospering in their new homeland but languishing in their old one.

http://hungarianfreepress.com/2015/04/25/demonizing-immigrants-heres-why-hungarys-fidesz-is-no-less-dangerous-than-jobbik/

exTor
Guest

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_diaspora

Actually, what Éva said was that no country willingly and freely accepts a huge influx of immigrants regardless of the circumstances. She said that even a liberal country like Canada had a difficult time with accepting Hungarians in 1956.

I was not aware of any problem at the time, as I was only six years old. I had already lived in Canada for five years (since 1951).

Whatever initial problems there might have been, many Magyars eventually ended up in Canada, which has the second-highest number of emigrant Hungarians. The US (with 10 times the population of Canada) harbors five times as many Magyars.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Peter Janos
Guest

Canada is on the bottom of Hungarian immigration list. It is not the favorite place for Hungarian people. Deal with it.

Webber
Guest

???
Peter Janos, as they’d put it where I grew up:
Dude! What is it with you?
Who cares if Canada is not destination no. 1 for people from little Hungary? I’m sure Canadians don’t.

exTor
Guest

You are divorced from reality, Peter Janos, with your verging-on-fatuous statement about country nonpreference. Aside from the US (where over a million and a half exHungarians live), Canada is the second choice of those emigrating from Hungary. About 315,000 former Hungarians moved there.

MAGY

steve397
Guest

I wanted to remind people that in 1956 all those who walked out Hungary were allowed into Austria and the British Commonwealth countries and those of South and North America gave them a home. However another Steve has said it already. Orban is trying to ape Jobbik’s nasty nationalism. It will not help him, he has gone too far already and Fidesz’ corrupt regime must fall.

Minusio
Guest

Of course, it will fail eventually. But when?

BTW, Switzerland also took in a lot of Hungarians in 1956.

Peter Janos
Guest

Those Hungarian people came from a similar civilization with similar western christian (European) values, which makes their integration easy in Western countries after the learning of local language. However economic refugee immigrants came from the third word with very different values and culture.

Member

People who cannot muster up compassion toward people who are less fortunate, who want to find a better place to live, don’t deserve compassion from others when they are in trouble.

The present Hungarian Government is cruel, heartless, the members are selfish, inhumane and rob the sick, the handicapped, the old, the weak and anyone they can. This is the example that helps to spreads selfishness and xenophobia, as an acceptable way of living.

Meanwhile many people in Hungary tend to forget, that the Western World had given Hungarians refuge for hundreds of years and accepts them today, gives them work and a place to live and a chance to make better future then their own Government which consists of thieves, criminals and the most heartless, cruel, disgusting bastards, ripe for the rope on their necks

Peter Janos
Guest

Adopt some refugees to your own house. Please show a personal good example for the humanity :)))

exTor
Guest
In Hungary, immigration issues intersect race. Viktor Orbán will get the results he wants with the leading questions of his questionnaire. He will use the ‘will of the people’ to further restrict immigration to Hungary, which is really a nonissue since few people want to come here to stay. Even in the country where I spent six decades, Canada has been playing hard on allowing Syrian refugees in, even though it has promised the UN that it would take a specific number. The prime minister of Canada is Stephen Harper and he reminds me of Viktor Orbán. Both are sharp politicians, however Harper is less devious than Orbán. Fidesz and the Conservatives occupy more or less the same space in their each country’s respective political spectrum. Fidesz is obviously (more ???) racist than the Conservative Party of Canada. Hungary is very white and very racist. I have had people start talking about the Roma and/or the Jews even when the conversation did not indicate the need. In other words, the talk was about some or other topic and the other party felt the need to inject a negative opinion about the Roma and Jews. It is at this point that… Read more »
steve397
Guest

Yes indeed. The constant “zsidozas” in Facebook also makes you sick.

Peter Janos
Guest

Wrong. Leftist voters are more racist according to all polls in Hungary

Webber
Guest

Peter Janos, I defy you to give us a link to any poll that shows that.

exTor
Guest

You have a very strange mindset, Péter János, seemingly confrontational at times. I would not call you provocative, more provoking. You throw out comments, not to engender discussion, but to upset. Your points are pointless, because you dont back them up. Where are “all [the] polls in Hungary” that you referred to?

There is no doubt that many leftists are racists. They live in Hungary and they possess (probably to a much-less extent) the same hangups that the rest of Hungarian society possesses. That said, the leftists do not have racist planks in their platform in the manner that the out-and-out-racist Jobbik does. Leftists (to my knowledge) are not sympathetic to the racists of Jobbik, as are many in Fidesz.

While superficially there may seem to be similarity on the issue of race, the difference between leftists and rightists is one of quantity and quality.

Leftists dont call for the removal (or worse) of the Roma.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Guest

Re: ‘Europe and the ‘other’

Only time will tell how European policies to immigration pan out. But perhaps we are seeing a case of constant irritation that perhaps may never go away.

Just some history. Back when the ‘Empire’ had many of those ‘barbarians’ seeing fertile ground in the provinces started to overrun the borders. Rome met them with force and delay. Took much time , money and effort to fight off the encroachers which exhausted them. But eventually the barbarians found themselves in Roman institutions and administration and helped to bring about the dissolution of the Empire and begin what would become European nation states.

Looks to be ‘back to the future’ once again with Europe. The pressure could be unrelenting.

Member
For the last few weeks I have a difficult time to get on the Internet as I am on remote locations in South Africa. Now this “news” seemingly has nothing to do with Eva’s topic, except that I am able to witness at first hand what xenophobia, fear mongering, nationalistic programs, and popularity pr can do to the soul of the unfortunate and poor. This country that become a democracy only a few years after Hungary became one deals with almost 30% unemployment, a hugely corrupt and unqualified government, rolling blackouts, and all. In order for the government to stay in power it regularly announces ideas that are greatly received by many, but the more informed and educated know that the ideas are simply cannot be executed or sustained. The poor of course see the high level of immigration as the source of all problem, even though emigration is also huge, not at last because of the programs the government implements. Here is the balance: Those who are educated and have some money accumulated leave South Africa, and those who are more impoverished in other countries than the South Africans who live in shanty towns move in. The poor started… Read more »
exTor
Guest

Ezt köszönjük Some1.

Lots of news about the current levels of unrest in South Africa. You have pointed out some similarities to what exists in Hungary. Take good notes.

I’d been wondering what had happened to you.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Live long and prosper
Guest
The metaphor for immigration issue which springs to mind, is of shipwreck survivors: those that have found safety in a lifeboat, at first help others to climb on board, and as the lifeboat approaches full capacity the oars are brought into use to beat back those still trying to climb aboard. Whilst our instinct is that we should do our best to welcome people desperately needing a new place to live, and to facilitate their transition to life in a new country, societal problems also derive from the large-scale influx of foreigners. It’s the scale of immigration that is the main cause of our concern. If the issue was with bearing the burden within the EU of providing homes annually for a few tens of thousands of people fleeing danger, terror, poverty and corrupt regimes, then we should together say: ‘come on: we must help these people’. But we are not talking about tens of thousands. We are talking, now, of hundreds of thousands, and, before long quite possibly, millions (the effects of global warming / climate change will accelerate the subsistence crisis on the margins of the regions where agriculture & life cease to be feasible). Such a scale… Read more »
exTor
Guest

A point of clarification, LLAP. You ARE in favor of some form of refugee immigration to Hungary. You may have misgivings about the numbers involved, however that should NOT mean that Hungary should shut its borders. Have I read you correctly? Please elaborate.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Miklós Haraszti
Guest
This is a great piece, Éva, with too much information to bear about the meanness of our times. Let me add a little linguistics of meanness. Orban, throughout his anti-immigration PR campaign, and in his 12-point “National Consultation” questionnaire, identifies the refugees as “megélhetési bevándorlók”, which he then lets translate for international use as “economic immigrants”. This is what we find in Eva’s translation — there is simply no match for the cruelty of the original adjective, “megélhetési”. But Orban never uses the adjective “economic”, that is “gazdasági”, when he speaks in Hungarian. What his consultation uses, “megélhetési”, is in fact a ready-made hate word in the Hungarian political language. Of course, the questionnaire’s hateful, xenophobic content speaks for itself even with “economic immigrant”, but the reader should know that what the Hungarians get, the original “megélhetési”, means “parasitic, opportunistic, profiteering, sharking” — and means all this in a super-despising way — it simply means a swindler. Examples: “megélhetési gyermekvállaló” (parents who ‘produce’ children solely for the sake of child welfare benefits) — it means a Roma parent and nothing else. Or: “megélhetési bűnöző” (a criminal out of poverty”) — invariantly just means a gipsy. Or: “megélhetési politikus” — means… Read more »
exTor
Guest

Re ‘megélhetési’.

Far from being semantically inscrutable, the word has a very definite denotation, namely: describing something done in order to survive.

This descriptor [adjective] can refer to things economic or even something more immediate, such as surviving a migration to another location. As such, Viktor Orbán was technically not incorrect using the word.

I was not aware, as Miklós Haraszti points out, that ‘megélhetési’ has been nuanced into a hate term. So, while on the surface Viktor Orbán has used the word correctly (in one sense) to stand for ‘economic’, he taps into the prevalent antiRoma sentiment extant in Hungary with his word usage.

Given the connotation (beyond the original denotation) that MH ascribes to ‘megélhetési’, a sensitive nonracist Magyar would definitely want to eschew its usage in connection with poverty immigrants to Hungary.

MAGYARKOZÓ

István
Guest

Really Orban’s use of the immigration issue is less offensive than Katie Hopkins’ article in the UK Sun newspaper where she compared migrants to “cockroaches.” Or some of the comments I am hearing up here at my northern Wisconsin country home about the arrest in Minneapolis Minnesota of Islamic State supporters and the suspicion now raised against all Moslems in this northern area of the USA. Orban is effectively riding the wave that exists among ethnic european whites on a world scale.

Minusio
Guest

The big difference is that Katie Hopkins and other strange opinions are lunatic-fringe expressions. In Hungary this disgusting nonsense is state doctrine.

István
Guest

Minusio if it were only true that such attitudes were fringe. In the USA based on 2015 polling data more than a third (37 percent) of US residents say they are worried about Sharia law—an Islamic legal and moral code—being applied in America. One in 4 (27 percent) believe the terrorist group ISIS reflects the true nature of Islam, while 4 in 10 (43 percent) believe Islam can create a peaceful society. About half (48 percent) disagree with the statement, “ISIS is not Islamic.” About 1 in 4 (22 percent) agree, while 3 in 10 are not sure. More than half (52 percent) of younger Americans, those 18 to 34, say Islam can create a peaceful society.

It is completely possible that the next President of the United States could take a much harder line on emigration, it polls here extremely well.

exTor
Guest

Further re ‘megélhetési’.

Words such ‘megélhetési’ and ‘alleged’ immediately contextualize sentences. Right away the reader realizes that something is up.

In the case of the English word ‘alleged’, regardless of any other possible meanings, it brings to mind illegality, crime, wrongdoing and a host of other negatives. These are the prime connotations of ‘alleged’.

Here in Hungary, as I have today come to learn, ‘megélhetési’ produces in the hearer/reader the idea of another form of wrongdoing, namely money gotten dubiously, eg: via corruption or some other form of crime.

Where no crime has actually been committed, a moralistic negativism has been appended to ‘megélhetési’, such as (in the case of some Roma and others) supposedly overbreeding in order to accrue extra child benefits.

As in other countries, if you dont like someone, then you will find a way to shit on that person. One way is verbally: ‘megélhetési’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest

ExTor: You are quite wrong on “alleged.” Some time ago I gave examples of common popular uses of the word that very obviously do not connote criminal activity. My examples were from the quality press in Britain. I might also have given examples from popular speech in the United States. The word is often used in a legal context about crime, but it is also frequently used in popular speech in the original meaning. I am not just alleging this, I have already demonstrated it to be so.

exTor
Guest

Thanx for the afterthought, Webber.

Actually, I’m not wrong about ‘alleged’. Others have pointed it out, including one who rightly confirmed that your Brit examples proved my point. I’m not sure why you’re not getting this.

Having spent an entire life in English and being involved with the intricacies of language in a way you cant even begin to imagine, I am more than a little aware of how ‘alleged’ is used. I am cognizant that the word is also used where ‘supposed’ is the more relevant descriptor.

Language changes; over the years it gets bent in new directions. One example is the idiom ‘beg the question’, which (for many people) has lost its idiomatic status. Given that reality, I advise that people looze that term.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Miklós Haraszti
Guest
Here is the history of the term “megélhetési”: The first political usage was “megélhetési politikusok” (politicians who are ready to serve whoever is ready to pay them). The inventor was Miklós Csapody, ex-MDF, who coined it somewhere between 1996 and 1998, the next day of the news of the defection of MPs Ervin Demeter and Csaba Hende. These two decided to sat over into the Fidesz benches, weakening the small liberal-conservative wing of the remaining MDF. (The Sándor Lezsák/ István Balsai national-conservative wing of MDF had defected earlier.) Csapody very concretely criticized Demeter and Hende. Ervin Demeter later was rewarded as the boss of Hungary’s secret services under the first govt of Orbán. After the fall of that govt, he was a hero (next to László Kövér) of the UDZRT private eye wiretapping scandal which was intended to ruin — who else — his former boss Ibolya David. The other, Csaba Hende (today Minister of Defense) became the central Fidesz keeper/financer of the Polgári Körök (Civic Circles) in 2002, a movement which was Orbán’s Red Guard/Tea Party in his own party in 2002 when he lost the elections and mutinies raised their heads against his continuing leadership. Csapody’s word, the… Read more »
spectator
Guest

Csapody’s word, the adjective “megélhetési” as used for politicians, became proverbial, simply meaning “corrupt” or worse. “Fake and greedy.”

I’d add to the explanation that it also means the kind of ‘politician’ who mostly incompetent in any other profession, – hence their livelihood depends on being ‘politician’ – or their political career much more lucrative, since they usually serve the highest bidder, with no true ideological or political allegiance to speak of.

Thank you for the thorough information, to me who’s been outside of the country during all these times many details were totally new!

Barr
Guest

Poor migrants are a Godsent to Orban. Most people hate them in Hungary (as elsewhere in Europe) so Orban scores points and acts decisively. It’s the market economy at its best. There is a market gap for mean, unabashed politicians and Orban fills the gap. His voters just likes him more for this. In a way he acts like that proverbial person with the 10 dollar bill on the pavement, it shouldn’t be there so picks it up. Can’t believe his luck.

Guest

Re: ‘megelhetesi’

Thank you for the translation. Fascinating. Curious how that word gets translated in various Western countries. So would it actually be ‘economic immigration?

I think Magyar is hard enough to translate well but this word harbors quite sinister attitudes. I’d say translators today have to be sharp today on say modern Orbanese -Magyar colloquialisms. Probably can make a book, eh? Nothing like language combined with nuance to remove all trace of perhaps obfuscation in getting things across to the populace.

spectator
Guest

You’re right, pretty soon we all need some Orbanian – Hungarian dictionary too!

Not enough the plethora of words like NER, TEK, KLIK – and the hell knows whatnot, there is another bunch of the great NATIONAL- Whatever’s too, then the generally used – international – words with totally different meaning lately in Hungary than anywhere else on the planet!

Anybody have seen the István Szabó film “Budapest tales”?
There was that streetcar wagon which was originally yellow, but later on get painted to some ugly spew-green color, but declared continuously to be yellow by the self appointed leader, so the people slowly accepted it as yellow…

Here we are again.

Guest

Istvan said it clearly:
“Orban is effectively riding the wave” …
And here also the USA and the UK were mentioned so I can add Germany (Pegida, horrible people which hate anyone not belonging to the “white Christians” …) and today while travelling through Austria we saw also horrible ads for the next election from the FPÖ (used to be Haider’s party – anyone remember this crazy guy?).

The right wing extremists in the “Western world” are all the same – and Orbán is showing that he is not a moderate conservative but belongs to that right wing extremist group, soon we’ll see real fascist tendencies in Fidesz, I’m sure!

A bit OT:

As an example of how politicians play with the stupidity and ignorance of voters everywhere:

There was a vote on allowing foreigners in Switzerland some time ago and the highest percentage of votes (No, we don’t want them!) came from the rural Appenzell counties – where there are practically no foreigners to be found!

Guest

Re: ‘Mr. Haider’

You know from the looks of it Orban sure took a page from Haider’s playbook. At one time in Austria during the late Haider’s heyday his Freedom Party was the topmost party for those under 30. Like Haider they had the ‘good fortune of a late birth’. Or in Jorg’s words: ‘ die Gnade der spaten Geburt’.

Obviously helpful when you want to plant stuff in kids’ brains that haven’t been tainted with some vestige of a past. So apparently I’d suggest that Orban like Haider knows the advantages of getting the young’uns in on a line that can run its course for quite a long awhile in the Magyar political sphere. He knows that it could pay dividends.

Member

There is definitely a negative connotation to the adjective “megélhetesi” in the contemporary Hungarian but in this case I believe this illiterate moron simply had trouble with the Hungarian language and misused the word. It means doing something for a living. Unfortunately all the average Hungarian Joe hears is that these people intentionally come here to live off the wellfare system.

He recently said that the issue of the death penalty “is also worth a mass”. He picks up these phrases from intelligent people, like “Paris is worth a mass”, then uses them in the wrong context. 

What do we expect from this sunflower seed spitting country bumpkin, who was “socialized on cured bacon” (*) as somebody aptly said it on Facebook. He is just lying for a living (“megélhetési” liar).

(*) “abáltszalonnán szocializálódott”

TeamBritanniaHu
Guest

I feel ashamed of the immigration ‘debate’ in Britain at present, but I suppose it’s good that there is, at least, a ‘debate’.

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[…] Below you will find a statement signed by a number of Hungarian sociologists who strongly object to the questionnaire the Hungarian government designed for the alleged purpose of gauging Hungarian public attitude toward refugees and immigrants. The twelve questions can be found in an earlier post. […]

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