Hungary’s latest lobbying effort: Connie Mack IV and Dana Rohrabacher

When I read last fall that Századvég, Fidesz’s favorite think tank, won a 1.4 billion forint contract to conduct lobbying activities in Washington, I was baffled. What expertise do the political analysts of Századvég have that would enable them to be successful lobbyists in the U.S. capital?  None. But obviously I don’t understand how these things work. Századvég got this huge amount of money to find someone with Washington connections to do the actual lobbying.

Of course, the Orbán government didn’t need Századvég to find the right man for the job. In fact, I suspect that Századvég had mighty little to do with this latest Hungarian attempt to influence American political opinion. It was most likely not Századvég who tapped Connie Mack IV, a former Republican congressman from Florida, to be Hungary’s new lobbyist but Arthur Finkelstein, a prominent Republican consultant with whom Fidesz has had a long-standing relationship and who was at one point Mack’s campaign manager. But since Századvég is suspected of being a kind of money laundering arm of Fidesz, a chunk of that 1.4 billion will most likely eventually end up in Fidesz coffers, if it hasn’t already.

Mack’s congressional career ended in January 2013 when, after eight years in the House of Representatives, he ran for the Senate and was badly defeated by the incumbent Democratic senator, Bill Nelson. He decided to try his hand at lobbying instead. Former politicians are ideal lobbyists because of their extensive ties with members of Congress.

In March, Századvég organized a conference on the country’s foreign policy where Connie Mack was one of the speakers. To the astonishment of a reporter from 444.hu, Mack insisted that Hungary’s reputation is actually quite good in Washington. Many American politicians acknowledge the achievements of the Orbán government. His job, it would appear, is to convince even more politicians that Hungary is a stalwart ally of the U.S. and that the Hungarian government is worthy of praise.

Connie Mack IV at the conference organized by Századvég / MTI, Photo by Zsolt Szigetvári

Connie Mack IV at the conference organized by Századvég / MTI, Photo by Zsolt Szigetvári

Mack, it seems, has been working pretty hard to improve Hungary’s image, and he’s even managed to show something for his money. On May 19 a hearing will be held on “The Future of U.S-Hungary Relations.” It is being organized by the Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats, a subcommittee of the Committee on Foreign Affairs. The chairman of this subcommittee is Dana Rohrabacher, a Republican congressman from California, who is considered to be the only defender of the Kremlin in Congress. According to a New York Times article, the congressman “speaks up for Moscow with pride” and is somewhat sore that he “hasn’t gotten so much as a thank you” from Moscow. In his ideological career Dana Rohrabacher has gone from being a free market anarchist to a a cold warrior who played a leading role in the formulation of the Reagan Doctrine and, now, to a Putin apologist. He finds the annexation of Crimea legitimate because the people of Crimea spoke and they have the right of self-determination. Recently, he voted against a $1 billion loan guarantee to support the new government of Ukraine and abstained on the vote to condemn Russia for violating Ukraine’s sovereignty. In a way, Rohrabacher is an obvious choice to press Hungary’s case since Viktor Orbán is considered to be Vladimir Putin’s Trojan horse in the European Union. How successful the openly pro-Russian congressman will be in today’s political climate in Washington is another question.

According to the invitation to the open hearing, there will be four “witnesses,” two who will most likely speak on behalf of the Hungarian government and two who will criticize it.

Frank Koszorus, Jr, president of the American Hungarian Federation, and Maximilian Teleki, president of Hungarian American Coalition, will undoubtedly extol the Orbán government while András Simonyi, former Hungarian ambassador to the United States who is currently with Johns Hopkins University’s SAIS, and Tad Stahnke, vice president for research and analysis of Human Rights First, will point to the darker side of the Orbán regime.

Koszorus’s relations with the current government have been very close, especially recently, since the government is in the process of making a national hero out of his late father for his alleged role in “saving the Jews of Budapest.” Max Teleki has been a bit more critical of the Orbán government lately than he was earlier. He is not alone in right-of-center circles in and out of Hungary. See his interview in The Budapest Beacon.

András Simonyi is considered to be an accomplished debater, and I’m sure that he will eloquently represent the other side. As for Stahnke, he works for Human Rights First, which last August published the best report ever on human rights violations in Hungary. I wrote about this excellent publication under the title ‘”We’re not nazis, but …: Human Rights First report on Hungary and Greece.” There are few people in the United States who are as familiar with the Hungarian domestic situation as he is.

I suspect that Rohrabacher’s attempt to whitewash Orbán’s domestic record and his double game with Putin will not succeed. He represents a view that is shared by mighty few American politicians, so I doubt that his advocacy of the Orbán regime will make an appreciable difference among those who matter. Connie Mack will have to come up with something better.

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Istvan
Guest

Teleki’s conversation reflects the growing hostility and embarrassment of American Hungarians to Orban’s pro-Putin public comments and actions. Conservative American Hungarians may have deep sympathy for the homeland but they are overwhelmingly loyal Americans not traitors to the interests of Putin’s new Russian empire. Max Teleki is obviously not stupid.

Paul
Guest

The BBC report on Putin’s “why don’t we all live together in peace and harmony” May Day parade, said that most western politicians had stayed away – implying, obviously, that some hadn’t. But they never said who had attended.

Was Orbán one of those who did go?

Paul
Guest

Entirely OT (for which my usual apologies)…

On the way to school yesterday, we were discussing the fact that many folk and fairy tales were actually moral stories, and I used the Hare and the Tortoise as an example (fast, but feckless, hare loses – steady, reliable tortoise wins).

My daughter then said something I was completely unaware of – that the Hungarian equivalent is the Hare and Hedgehog, where the hedgehog ‘wins’ by deception and cheating – Mrs Hedgehog takes first place, pretending to be her husband (by the stunningly clever ruse of removing her apron!).

There, in a nutshell, you have the ‘Hungarian problem’.

Guest

The story about the Hare and the Tortoise is ascribed to Zeno, the old Greek (about 450 BC), who invented it to illustrate a paradox he had stumbled on because it was not yet understood how to handle infinitesimals.

The story about the Hare and the Hedgehog is about trickery. It is the pride of Grimm’s collection of German folk tales.

Tyrker
Guest

Paul – The Tortoise and the Hare is one of Aesop’s fables. The Hare and the Hedgehog is a German fairy tale popularised by the brothers Grimm. Neither has anything to do wth Hungary or aprons.

Member

After Cornelius McGillicuddy (that’s his real name) was booted from the Senate he immediately headed to K street and joined five lobbying firms. One of these was Liberty Partners, that made millions lobbying for dental group practice associations for instance. I guess Orban or a toothpaste, doesn’t matter. Whatever pays. I wonder how does this work. These lobbying firms just simply go on the payroll of the Hungarian government? How much does this rent-a-goebbels cost to the Hungarian taxpayer? For how much is a US senator willing to lie about a dictator?

spectator
Guest

“I guess Orban or a toothpaste, doesn’t matter.”

Actually it doesn’t!
If you can promote/sell toothpaste, you can sell Orbán too, even if there’s a different pubic for these two…

This is where the democratic opposition of Hungary – OK., imagine one, just to make my example work, please, – always wrong: ‘political’ marketing isn’t that different from any other kind of reklam or marketing work, really, so it isn’t work for politicians but for marketing professionals.

Who knows, maybe there is a market for toothpaste too, particularly among the “admirers” Orbán surrounding himself with.
A free advice though: exceptionally strong whitening feature a must!

Alex Kuli
Guest

It will be interesting to see how many congressmen and women actually show up at the committee hearing. Oftentimes, PR exercises such as this attract only the chairman and a single member of the opposing party. It’s Congress’ way of saying “we couldn’t care less.”

Member

Here is the official program (can be updated until the last minute):
http://foreignaffairs.house.gov/hearing/subcommittee-hearing-future-us-hungary-relations

Considering the subject I find it strange that no government representative is indicated for testimony, either US or Hungarian. The last such hearing took place at US Helsinki Commission but despite the recent leadership change influential long-term key staffers remained sharply critical: http://www.csce.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=AboutCommission.WorkOfCommission
I don’t think bigot Ch.Smith has changed his mind but over the time his support became more concealed.
I expect Amb.Simonyi (alias obester) to stay balanced: SAIS needs continued cooperation from this fora. I expect him to use more of a diplomatic language than going dire. We will see soon how it works out. A telling evidence for the intentions of this hearing to make him speak first.

BTW I do not expect ANYONE to change her/ his opinion because of this event but it could be sold for the HunGov as a movement.

LwiiH
Guest

Having met András (and his brother Charles) all I can say is that he is a remarkable person. I have every confidence that he will do just fine representing Hungary’s interests.

OT, this was pointed out by a Romanian friend of mine. http://dailynewshungary.com/film-shoot-about-legendary-race-horse-kincsem-to-start-in-october/. No state funds will be accepted to support this project.

qaz
Guest

re: Kincsem
The illustrating picture appearing in Daily News Hungary is that of a male (probably not gelded judging from his overall look) while Kincsem was a mare

exTor
Guest

“… Századvég is suspected of being a being a kind of money-laundering arm of Fidesz …”

The way I read this, Éva, Fidesz creates money illegally and Századvég washes that money for Fidesz.

Another possible interpretation: Fidesz is associated with Századvég, irrespective of the latter’s misreputation for money laundering.

I dont understand the “end up [back] in Fidesz coffers” statement. That’s not money laundering, that’s kicking back.

Please elucidate. Thanx.

MAGYARKOZÓ

exTor
Guest

Well, this is my century post, which started with my first (Val Day) post back in midFebruary. Only one (FEB 16) didn’t see the light of sway.

That Hungary is trying to untarnish its image, starting with Washington, is understandable. Hiring a thinktank, which (when it comes to Századvég) reminds me of ‘stink rank’, may seem the right way to go for Fideszers.

Given that fellow Republican John McCain pinned Viktor Orbán as a neofascist, Connie Mack IV (who should have becoma a pro baseballer, like his greatgrandfather) has got bigtime work ahead of him.

Viktor Orbán seems to be trying to work both ends [Russia and the US] against the middle [his isolation in the EU]. This play at American sympathy may be a way to mitigate the potential severity/danger of putting all his eggs in one [Russian] basket.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest
I don’t think untarnishing the government’s image in Washington is the primary goal. I think the main idea is to hold this little circus and then repeat every positive word anybody says about Hungary in the government press – of course, without mentioning that those who praised Hungary were/are paid to do so with Hungarian taxpayers’ money. They’ll tout Connie Mack as “very important,” and they hope the average Józsi won’t know better. They hope he’ll think, “Wow! The famous Connie Mack – a bona fide American – is praising our government in Washington!” Then any criticism that comes from Washington can be ignored, because “Connie Mack defended Hungary in Congress.” I wouldn’t be surprised if they coached Connie Mack on what to say ahead of time. It’s an old trick. Governments in the Horthy era played it, too – they wined and dined British MPs, and paid people in Washington to say what they wanted the press in Budapest to hear. Sometimes they even wrote articles for some British MP to publish under his name, and they had “journalists” on the take in France, Italy, the US, you name it. Then, when the article appeared under some foreign journalist’s… Read more »
Sackhoes Contributor
Guest

You can search the US Foreign Agents list at http://www.fara.gov/quick-search.html where you can actually inspect the filed document. Currently there are three agents listed. The foreign principal in all three cases is the Prime Minister’s Office, Government of Hungary. You can see the contract between the Prime Minister’s Office and Szazadveg, SLI and Liberty International Group. http://www.fara.gov/docs/6259-Exhibit-AB-20141205-2.pdf

Webber
Guest

Thank you for that Sackhoes! It’s Hilarious! The idiots couldn’t get the English right in the contract they filed with the Justice Department. They don’t mind spending a small fortune on a lobbyist, but they’re still too cheap to pay a native speaker a little money to correct the English in a contract they file with the US government.

exTor
Guest

I’d given the PDF a quick look, Webber, however I hadn’t noticed anything. Can you point out where you found some dubious semantics? Thanx.

Reminds me the 1960s when Japanese products starting hitting North American shelves. The English on the labels was often a riot to read.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest

Just patiently read through it, and you’ll see. It’s full of misplaced apostrophes, misspelled words, and lousy grammar – for instance:

“Assignee by signing of the present agreement hereby declares that Assignee is entitled to an exclusive user’s right which is transferable to a third person concerning to the works affected by copyright without any restriction concerning to geographical area for the total protection period of the works for all known methods of use covering also the right of adaptation and the Assignee hereby
transferres with the present contract these right as an exclusive right and without any restriction and without any extra royalty to the Assignor. The Assignee expressly waives the extra fee in return for the transfer of user’s rights by signing the present contract.”

Just to mention the a few of the most glaring mistakes in that:
“by signing of the”???
“concerning to”???
“transferres”?

exTor
Guest

Thanx Webber, I see your point. I dont have the patience to parse the lawyerly verbiage. Most of it seems to be quite minor, however, which would still be bothersome to a perfectionist like me.

MAGYARKOZÓ

exTor
Guest

OMG !!! The perfectionist is mortified. The second paragraph of my above 12:12 AM entry should have begun with “Reminds me of the 1960s when Japanese products started hitting … .” Two mistakes. Tired.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest

Nobody’s bothered but you. It’s just a comment under a blog, after all (not an international contract). Everyone makes mistakes.

exTor
Guest

Well, yah, but still . . .

MAGYARKOZÓ

István
Guest
If you just go back to Ambassador Kounalakis’s book, which I did finish reading, that was discussed yesterday by Eva and others including myself you get an idea of the complexity of the U.S. relationship with Orban’s government. For example the Ambassador can state PM Orban can be worked with and that he is not irrational and then say “rather than creating a transparent and predictable business environment that would allow Hungarian companies to rise up through open competition, Prime Minister Orban appeared to be closing competition to all but a few companies, whose success he sanctioned.” Which is clearly a statement about systemic Fidesz corruption we are all aware of. Or the Ambassador can write negative things about Csaba Hende’s behavior and yet want to forge a friendship with him in order to support NATO efforts in Afghanistan. So a lobbying effort on the part of the Fidesz government has to emphasize the utility of Hungary to US interests. An example would be MOL’s oil extraction work in Kurdistan which provides money for the Kurds to fight the Islamic State. Clearly that lobbying effort would discount Orban’s Russian orientation or the Hungarian IRS trying to extort money from US… Read more »
spectator
Guest

What disturbed me most is the effort, how Ambassador Kounalakis tried to explain and present in a positive way Orbán’s character flaw, in the “this is not a bug, but a feature!” manner:

“Mr. President, some people say he’s crazy. I don’t think that’s right. I see him as a very smart, very rational man. But he doesn’t seem to me to have the same concept, the same definitions as we do of democracy, freedom, and even free markets. I think he sees himself as the only one who can protect the Hungarian people from what he believes are corrupting outside influences…. “

While the assessment perfectly correct, I would say, the conclusion is nothing but!

This is a fundamental problem with Orbán, – just as with the proverbial driver driving agains all the others – he has completely different definition of the very elements of policy making, and he goes for it, according to himself alone.

Just another day I tried to call the attention to how wrongly misinterpreted “liberalism” in Hungary, but just a same applies to democracy, freedom, equality, you name it.

Someone really must start to assemble some “Orbanian-Hungarian” to “Orbanian-English” dictionary too, right after the “Orbanian to Hungarian” volume…

Jon Van Til
Guest

On “the complexity of the U.S. relationship with Orban’s government”: Yes, this does seem to me to be the central point of the Kounalakis’ book. The highest concern of the Obama/Clinton administration was clearly Afghanistan, and Hungary had its helpful bit part to play there. The State Department was also interested in sustaining democracy in Hungary, but that was a secondary concern.

Within those constraints, the remarkably talented and spunky Kounalakis played her role–giving her Hungarian contacts, including Orban, every chance to reciprocate her sunny view of life. She’s written an honest and engaging book, and this reader finds it hard to see how she and her remarkable staff could have done a better job than they did in those three turbulent years.

buddy
Guest

This just occurred to me: the Orbán government is paying somebody to directly influence the US government. But hasn’t this government complained numerous times that NGOs like Ökotárs and DemNet accepted foreign money to influence Hungarian policy in order to promote human rights and democracy? Not to mention their offices were raided and their computers were taken, among other things.

Why is it OK when the Hungarian government openly does this abroad, but not OK when NGOs who receive foreign money try to do it in Hungary? Sounds like rank hypocrisy to me.

Webber
Guest
Buddy – it “just occurred to” you??? That sounds just a little faux naif, but I’ll answer as if what you said were honest, and not something puppetlike smelling rankly of hypocrisy. First, nobody here has ever said the Hungarian government can’t lobby in Washington. It’s perfectly legal in America – as long as it is done openly, and the source of funds is made public. It’s also perfectly okay to criticize such lobbying, and point out how silly it is (a waste of Hungarian taxpayers’ money, if you ask me: Connie Mack couldn’t influence a paper bag). As to the other part of your statement, it’s simply wrong. First, Hungarian NGOs do not receive foreign money to improve America’s (or Norway’s or Britain’s, etc.) image in Hungary. Hungarian NGOs get money (from Norway, at least) for things like making puppets out of socks, feeding the poor, etc. Now, Hungarian PARTIES certainly do get American (and other) funding. That is absolutely true. Fidesz, for instance, got a lot of funding from the US government in the past – starting from when the party was founded. Apparently Jobbik got lots of money from Russia recently. With the Paks deal, we might… Read more »
googly
Guest
Webber, Besides being a hypocrite, a coward, and a jerk, now you’re showing us what an arrogant, condescending bully you are, too. Just because buddy didn’t pick up on this particular Fidesz hypocrisy yet (although it could just be a figure of speech) doesn’t mean that you have the right to attack him as if he is lying or trolling, or somehow inferior to you. When you accused me of writing things that I didn’t write, then ignored my attempts to get you to defend what you wrote and quote me where I wrote what you claimed that I wrote, it became clear to me that if anyone (other than Eva, you brown-nosing sycophant) disagrees with you, or even questions you, that person is instantly a target of your vile name-calling and slanderous insinuations. Now you’re saying buddy is a “little faux naif” in your first sentence, then you act like he’s not very bright, in your last sentence. If you had been paying attention to his/her posts in the past, you would know that he/she is not, as you insinuate, an idiot, a troll, or even an honest fidesznik, but someone who broadly agrees with you. If this is… Read more »
Member

Slow down, Googly ….

Webber
Guest

Googly hates me personally (though he doesn’t know me), and enjoys expressing that from time to time here. Some weeks ago he promised Eva he wouldn’t do it any more, but apparently it’s a difficult promise for him to keep.

Webber
Guest

Also, Googly suggested I apologize to him some days ago, and I did so. Apparently he didn’t see it, or didn’t find it adequate. In any case, he has been following my posts and insulting me periodically for quite some time now.

googly
Guest
Webber, You wrote: “he has been following my posts and insulting me periodically for quite some time now.” If you did apologise to me, I definitely did not see it. I sometimes miss comments, even though I try to read every one, so don’t flatter yourself that I am “following” you any more than anyone else who comments here. As far as insulting, everything I write has a basis in fact and is a legitimate response to what you write. What you wrote to buddy is quite clearly not based in fact and is over the line, and I don’t see why Eva doesn’t mention it. If there is anyone besides you who disagrees with me, I would like to hear why. I will continue to point out your mistakes and criticise your unfounded attacks until you stop writing them, Eva bans me from the site, or I am unable to do so. Of course, I don’t have time to point out everything you do that is wrong, but I will try to catch the bigger ones. You wrote: “Some weeks ago he promised Eva he wouldn’t do it any more, but apparently it’s a difficult promise for him to… Read more »
googly
Guest

Webber,

Just read your apology – do you work for a multinational firm as a lawyer? If not, consider changing careers, because you have some skill in using “apologies” that don’t actually admit wrongdoing, and actually are more like insults.

It’s not my “feelings” that were hurt, it was my sense of fairness and my reputation. If you wanted to apologize, you would take back what you wrote and admit that you wrongly accused me. If you do that, I will acknowledge that I was wrong about your character.

Webber
Guest
What reputation?? “Googly” is a pseudonym (so is Webber). Incidentally, you did say you would stop, though you’ve apparently forgotten. Gentlemen keep their promises. You seem to be obsessed with me. Get help. Since you act this way (whether compulsively, or as an active decision), and find my apology inadequate for you, I retract it. I started paying attention to you again after I apologized. That was clearly a mistake. From now on, I promise, I will not read a damned thing you write, much less react. I will not waste my time on people who don’t keep promises. As a farewell: a person who follows another online just to find things to criticize is, by definition, a troll and – in my view – a creep. I quote from the Wikipedia entry: “a troll (/ˈtroʊl/, /ˈtrɒl/) is a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting arguments or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory,extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community (such as a newsgroup, forum, chat room, or blog) with the deliberate intent of provoking readers into an emotional response or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion.” That fits your comments to me above, and elsewhere, to a… Read more »
googly
Guest
Webber, You wrote: “You seem to be obsessed with me.” No, as I explained earlier (do you even bother to read what I write before accusing me of things?), I act this way towards all bullies, liars, and libelers. You just happen to bully, lie, and libel much more than anyone else. You wrote: “From now on, I promise, I will not read a damned thing you write, much less react.” I look forward to that. If you don’t keep your promise, as I have, I will remind you of your latest hypocrisy. Of course, not reading what I write does not make it any less true. You wrote: “a person who follows another online just to find things to criticize is, by definition, a troll” Perhaps, but that doesn’t describe me. I read all comments on this blog, as I pointed out earlier in the thread, but of course you don’t read what I write, otherwise you might have to deal with the legitimate criticism that I proffer, which would puncture your giant ego. I respond to what I read, whether it’s your garbage or someone else’s, or just an interesting comment. You continued: “in my view – a… Read more »
googly
Guest

No, Webber, i don’t hate you personally, I hate hypocrites, bullies, and people who remind me of Fideszniks. I noticed you, once again, refused to address my points. I guess that since you have no riposte, you know that you cannot defend the indefensible. Case closed. Stop bullying people, and I’ll stop pointing it out.

googly
Guest

muttdamon, if this were his first time bullying someone, I would have been much gentler. Take a look through his posts, you’ll see what I mean.

Istvan
Guest

Well buddy it is indeed rank hypocrisy. But it the USA as long as the foreign agent is registered it is legal for Hungary to do this type of lobbying. For that matter it is also hypocrisy that Ökotárs’ activities were targeted when financial support has been provided by the Hungarian government to actual political organizations in Romania.

baan
Guest
An
Guest

Interesting to note that Finkelstein is credited with turning the word “liberal” into a swear word in American politics.

Guest

Not too much OT:
A report on Finkelstein’s activities by Breitbart.com – itself a very right wing site afaik:
http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2014/07/29/norman-finkelstein-s-sparsely-attended-pro-palestine-rally-in-nyc-leads-to-arrests/
Seems a bit funny to me – Breitbart supports UKIP, if you believe the Guardian:
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2014/apr/29/climate-denial-oil-addiction-xenophobia-neocons

An
Guest

Wolfi, I think that’s a different Finkelstein. Norman Finkelstein is a professor, and Arthur Finkelstein is a political advisor.

Webber
Guest

An is right, it’s not that Finkelstein, it’s this Finkelstein:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_J._Finkelstein

Guest

Thanks, An and Webber!

I got a little confused – probably from reading what kind of crap Norman F writes …
But Arthur is not much better!

Julius Geonczeol
Guest
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in times when he was Pres. Reagan’s speechwriter used some of the speeches Lajos Kossuth Kossuth delivered in 1852 and Lincoln also had the oportunity to listen in Springfield, Illinois. Lincoln at that time was an Illinois state rep. and presided over the committee that received Governor Kossuth. Mr. Rohrabacher also knew Kossuth’s speech in Columbus Ohio before the Ohio assembly explaining what was democracy supposed to be. Partially elements of that speech were mentioned in Lincoln’s famous speech before the bloody battle with the south in Gettysburgh. So Mr. Rohrabacher has some deeper understanding of the problems the Hungarians have in face of the lies about us Hungarians specificallly entertained by heavy handed and illiterate leaders of the USA. Especially, since the Balfour declaration certain USA circles are so much anti-Hungarian in their behaviour that borders with racism. Current “performance” of US diplomats in Hungary added to the picture that helped to tarnish the picture the Hungarians have about the USA. In case of the Ukraine, we have there an extreme nationalistic regime that is used by US oligarchs to destabilize Russia. It cannot happen, however it will lead to a soviet restoration after Putin due… Read more »
Webber
Guest

Your crystal ball is cracked, and your knowledge of American history vis-a-vis Hungary is faulty, to say the least. Nobody in the US government is “lying” to the American public about Hungary. The American public couldn’t care less about Hungary, and the government has been restrained and said very little about the country – but that little has been fairly accurate in my view (hajszál pontos actually)
Answer me this:
Is Rohrabacker an Orban-backer?
If he is, how much has he or his campaign gotten from the Hungarian government? That will be public information, so please don’t lie.

Webber
Guest

I’ll add this – if you want to portray the government and Congress of the United States of America as Hungary’s and Hungarians’ enemies, that is your problem. I can only hope your sort of false thinking won’t make it Hungary’s problem.

Julius Geonczeol
Guest

I lived in the United States since 1981 and I have my experiences. The information about the Hungarians in the USA is bulk garbage and discusting. From accusing us to start WW1 to this latest development, etc. And now you are discusted, because one Congressman thinks otherwise? In former Czechoslovakia, the saint cow of the west the Benes decrees were in effect and are still in both remaining countries. They are featuring collective crime that is banned by the Charter of the United Nations. And did the US condemn ever such practice? Did ever in the US anybody condemn persecusion of the Hungarians? Never. So keep rather your mouth closed.

Webber
Guest
Actually, yes – Congress condemned the persecution of Hungarians in Ceausescu’s Romania – you would surely know that if you lived in America in the 1980s. There were hearings on it then – I have the minutes of one of them on my shelf. American Human Rights organizations condemned the persecution of Hungarians in Vojvodina in the 1990s. You should know that. If you’ve lived in the US for 34 years, why is your English so bad? Also, if you think Americans are so bad to Hungarians, why do you continue to live in the U.S.? (if you actually do). If you are such a great Hungarian patriot, why not move to Hungary and contribute to Hungarian society? It’s not hard. Life in Hungary is cheaper than America. You can get your social security benefits in Hungary. On other claims you’ve made: No American ever accused Hungary of starting WWI. Where did you get that nonsense? And information about Hungarians in the US is not “garbage.” If you really lived in the States you’d surely know it’s practically nonexistent because you’d know that (most) Americans couldn’t care less about Hungary, or Romania, or Ghana, or Benin, or Laos,etc. Those Americans… Read more »
Member

The Orban government’s efforts to find supporters reminds me on the Mel Brooks movie, the Blazing Saddles. The recruiting scene, where the thugs sign up – thiefs, rapists, nazis, KKK … all the best. Orban has the same, toothpaste salesmen, anti-Semites, Putin lovers, … you name them.

https://youtu.be/hshbq4_OySI

Member
wpDiscuz