Viktor Orbán and FIFA’s Sepp Blatter

The international media noticed that Vladimir Putin and his sports minister warmly greeted the controversial reelection of Sepp Blatter as president of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). They missed a short Hungarian-language message from Viktor Orbán on Facebook. The Hungarian prime minister wished Blatter, who was reelected for the fourth time as president of the powerful and corruption-riddled FIFA, “continued good work.” Blatter’s success was short-lived. Five days later he announced his resignation, which will take effect at an extraordinary congress, probably in December. The reason for Blatter’s change of heart is that he is being investigated by U.S. prosecutors and the FBI.

Viktor Orbán’s congratulatory note was especially curious because Sándor Csányi, president of the Magyar Labdarugó Szövetség/Hungarian Football Association (MLSZ), had earlier made it clear that Blatter would not get his vote. Why would Orbán go out of his way to make his strong support of Blatter public?

Blatter and Orbán go back a long way. I traced their cooperation to 2006, when the idea of establishing a FIFA award honoring Ferenc Puskás first came up. Apparently, the original idea wasn’t Orbán’s, but when he heard about it he moved into high gear with the help of Mrs. Puskás, who is apparently a personal friend of Blatter. The initial idea was completely reworked until, in 2009, the first Puskás Award was given to the player, male or female, judged to have scored the most aesthetically significant or “the most beautiful” goal of the year.

The Puskás Academy was heavily involved in the negotiations right up until the time, on October 20, 2009, the contract between FIFA and Mrs. Puskás, who has the right to the use of the Puskás name, was signed. It was signed in Felcsút by the great Sepp Blatter himself. Nemzeti Sport, Orbán favorite sports paper, proudly announced that Blatter’s presence was no ordinary event. Normally, such contracts are signed by one of his subordinates. Of course, Viktor Orbán, the founder of the Puskás Academy, also delivered a speech in which he declared that “this event is like a goal that delivers the victory.” Blatter received the flag of the Puskás Academy as a memento. The first time the award was presented was on December 21, 2009, at the FIFA World Player of the Year Gala, to which Viktor Orbán was invited. From this time on, Orbán has traveled to Zurich every year to be present at the award ceremony.

In 2011, when Hungary held the presidency of the European Union, Orbán took advantage of his position and visited practically all the countries of the Union. He also made an official visit to FIFA, at Blatter’s invitation, during which “he held talks” with Blatter about “the differences of opinion between FIFA and the European Union.” He promised the FIFA president that he would do his best to convince the EU to change some of the rules concerning the employment contracts of football players. At that point Blatter was seeking reelection but Orbán refused to commit himself one way or the other because, as he put it, “it is better that politics holds its distance from professional football.” He added, however, that “the world of football is not ready to have its leadership move outside of Europe.” Blatter’s challenger was Mohamed Bin Hammam, the president of the Asian Football Confederation.

In 2012 Orbán convinced Blatter to hold FIFA’s 64th congress in Budapest. Hungary had hosted this event only twice before in the 108-year history of FIFA: in 1909 and in 1930. Sándor Csányi, Orbán’s appointment really, had just become president of MLSZ, and in his speech he talked about the fantastic achievements of the previous two years of Hungarian football. “Yearly, we build 200 football fields, 1,000 amateur clubs receive financial help, and the number of amateur football players has grown by 20%.” Blatter, for his part, thanked the Hungarians for making the congress a great success. A bit later Orbán received a thank you note from Blatter in which he praised Orbán’s speech at the opening of the congress. Blatter especially liked Orbán’s remark that “fair play is strength, not weakness.”

Pál Schmitt, Sepp Blatter, and Viktor Orbán in 2009 at the Puskás Award ceremony

Pál Schmitt, Sepp Blatter, and Viktor Orbán in 2009 at the Puskás Award ceremony

Orbán’s close relationship with Blatter has had its advantages. For example, he receives invitations from FIFA to attend the world championships, where he can watch the games from the VIP section. He hasn’t missed one since 1998. Although he has to pay for his airfare, all other expenses are covered by FIFA. In Brazil his  son, Gáspár, even accompanied him and sat next to him in the VIP section, right beneath Vladimir Putin and Angela Merkel.

Hungary will host the 2020 European Championship at the rebuilt Puskás Stadium in Budapest. The stadium will look impressive, as the pictures in an English-language article in portfolio.hu amply demonstrate. The stadium, according to Orbán, will be part of a larger center for Olympic sports. Yes, in the last few months the idea of bidding for the Olympic games in 2024 has resurfaced. In 2017 Hungary will host the world championship organized by FINA (Fédération Internationale de Natation), which is responsible for administering international competitions in aquatics. That event will cost Hungarian taxpayers 45 billion forints. Many Hungarians ardently hope that Budapest will not win the right to hold the Olympic Games in Budapest because that will truly be beyond the financial capabilities of the country. As it is, the 2017 FINA world championship was awarded to Hungary unexpectedly. The original winner, Guadalajara in Mexico, withdrew in the last moment. The reason: the price of oil fell and they could no longer afford it. The president of FINA praised Hungary and Orbán “as friends in a difficult moment.”

Orbán’s lofty ideas about sports and fair play sound less than genuine in view of his own political career and personal life. “Sports give a chance for us to understand how to win in a fair way and how to accept defeat with some respect!”

I’m almost certain that Orbán has his heart set on hosting one of the future World Cups. Most likely he believed that Blatter’s presidency would give him an edge. And that extra advantage is needed since Hungary’s ranking in the world of football is very low: forty-third out of fifty. It will be interesting to watch how Orbán navigates a newly reformed and reconstructed FIFA.

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Csaba K. Zoltani
Guest

According to the FIFA world ranking of 209 national teams, USA is 28th, Hungary 43rd and Israel 46th. Anguilla is 209th.

buddy
Guest

One important clarification to Hungary’s involvement in the 2020 UEFA Euro championship: Budapest will only be one of 13 cities that will host the matches, so it won’t be the sole host of the tournament.

Guest

The phrase “birds of a feather flock together” seems relevant when discussing Blatter and Orbán.

Guest

Re: ‘birds of a feather’

You know it’s amazing to see how Sepp high-tailed it out of his seat after he vowed to set FIFA right again after all the corruption raged on under his watch for all the years. That defiance of his that he had shown for quite awhile seemed to melt away pretty quick.

No doubt after talking with his lawyers he had it told to him that he could be in legal jeopardy if he continued in his position.

Just thinking how Victor sees his pal Sepp parting ways under the circumstances. Curious if his legal mind sees anything that might get him high -tailed away too by veering a bit from the ‘straight and narrow’ down the line someday. Point for him to ponder with his shady dealings.
Thing is does he have a conscience?

fi3
Guest

A British journalist , Andrew Jennings has written a lot about the racketeering of Blatter.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/06/03/how-a-curmudgeonly-old-reporter-exposed-the-fifa-scandal-that-toppled-sepp-blatter/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Jennings

We could hire him to write a bigger story of Orban/Vona/Fidesz/Jobbik.

Kounalakis, Hillary, and Obama have failed us, and Goodfriend was ordered back.

dvhr
Guest

Orban’s course worked again.

Guest

@dvhr:
Yes, I’ve also thought about that “curse” … 😉

Zusammen
Guest

(1) Nothing will change, FIFA will remain corrupt, so Orban can funnel money to well-connected FIFA officials, only the methods will be smarter.

(2) No sane country (Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, Holland etc) will want to host Olympics or World Championships because they don’t want to burn billions of euros of totally needless vanity (corruption) projects, for a two-week party essentially.

For example the stadiums built for the Brazilian football WC are standing there empty as are the Olympic game stadiums in Sochi or Athens. So that will leave idiots like Orban (Hungary) who will host these insanely expensive games and let me assure you we will.

The political pressure is too big, such a game – like Paks 2 – is a never-ending bonanza for politicians, were talking about some 10bn euros as a lower figure (of course politicians will lie and say to the public that this time it will be very cheap, only 4-5bn euros, but just like with the Swimming Championship which was started with 25bn forints and now stands at 50bn, and the buildings are still only plan on paper, the amounts will soon double, triple).

Rihchard P. Ray
Guest
Dear Eva, I have read every one of your blogs for quite some time now. I think they would better serve their intended purpose if you understood some simple principles: 1. A politician (left or right) must speak to his audience, be they artists, engineers, or football enthusiasts. 2. Not everything a politician says about one side should be interpreted as being against another view. For example, Orban is for football (obviously). That does not mean he is against theater, fine arts, music, etc. That said, he is what he is and I would not expect a critique of La Boheme coming from his office. 3. When translating articles in the Hungarian Press, or Orban’s speeches, kindly refrain from “sliding translation” to favor your viewpoint, I have seen it in many occasions and do not appreciate the intent. 4. FIFA is obviously in trouble, thank God, but that is FIFA’s problem, not Orban’s or Hungary’s. 5. Please, please, please, stop telling me what is wrong, and start telling me what is right, or what can be done (aside from protest, letter-writing, and general angst) to make this country better. You can be part of the problem, or part of the… Read more »
Guest

@Richard:
If you have those great ideas about what could be done in Hungary – why don’t you write about it, or better even start doing something?
Prfo Balogh is just a diligent observer, living in the USA and also (like me and many here) not among the younger generation which should be active!

petofi
Guest
@ Richard P. Ray Obviously, you have next to 0 experience of the Hungarian reality, and the Hungarian problem. There are no pat solutions, some easy answers, some intellectual ‘discoveries’. First off, your dealing with a society whose norms and values have not, even closely, kept up with modern developments…by this I mean that those in power have well nigh total power over government personnel, business decisions in the country and what have you. There are no ‘protections’ for government personnel, for instance. Are you aware that this government has fired over 200 members of the Foreign Ministry in one day? Have you ever witnessed such a thing in a modern country? There are no ‘rights’, as such, in Hungary. Are you aware that a software expert with a state-of-the-art program for distributing EU monies was deprived of his company, first by sending in the tax people to hound him about his taxes? Did you know that after he was forced to sell to an unsavory group–at their price, not his–he soon after died? Your not talking about a modern society/country here: Hungary has turned to tribal practices and realities. Before you make unrealistic demands, try to understand what you… Read more »
Nádas
Guest

And Orbán let go many more than 200 from Magyar Rádió.

István
Guest

Petofi you have your moments of insight. I think that economic historian Ivan Bernard has correctly captured the essence of the lack of modernity that applies to many Central European nations.

Kormos
Guest

@ Rihchard P. Ray with an interesting spelling of the first name.
I also follow this blog since long time and I maintain that it is a very important tool. I only admire Ms. Balogh’s perseverance, since in my poor estimate she has worked more than twenty thousand hours since 2007. Think about your own life,and imagine yourself spending so many working hours with such level of success.

spectator
Guest
“Not everything a politician says about one side should be interpreted as being against another view. For example, Orban is for football (obviously). That does not mean he is against theater, fine arts, music, etc. That said, he is what he is and I would not expect a critique of La Boheme coming from his office.” Now what’s wrong with this picture about a pro-football amateur, and your perception of the matter? You see, there is no need for ‘interpretation” of Orbán’s rants, he’s clearly expressing his ignorance regarding just about everything else but soccer/football – as you like. Among those exceptional few things you’ll find greasy food, “pálinka”, and some entertaining singing in the company of likewise developed intellectuals. And yes, he is against theatre as soon as it isn’t comply with his “taste”, and yes, he is against fine art per definition, only “his kind” of arts and artists supported, his preferred “music” – besides what he participating as a performer – according his latest public recommendation is recently Nationalist rock, – some variation to the tacky kitsch he listened earlier. And yes, plenty of information available to check this out, mostly in Hungarian, though. What’s wrong with… Read more »
Nádas
Guest

It may be a bit premature to dance on Blatter’s grave. Like Orbán, he is a skillful, Machiavellian politician. Although he has resigned, he remains in a position of considerable power for at least six months to come. That’s plenty of time, according to one observer writing on the CNN site, to influence the future of FIFA from behind the scenes. “Football fans should not assume that this is the last we will see of Blatter.”

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/06/03/opinions/fifa-blatter-future/index.html

Jon Van Til
Guest

@Richard Ray
A good deal happens in Hungary that is heartening, but very little of this appears to be understood or supported by its governmental leaders. So it is understandably difficult for thoughtful observers of the Hungarian scene to focus only on the bright side, the shadows on the dark side being so deep and ominous.

In The Hungarian Patient, a new book anticipated for release by the Central European University Press within the next several weeks, nineteen authors focus on a range of thoughtful ideas and positive actions that have been taken within Hungarian oppositional movements and organizations over the last few years. Andras Bozoki, Kim Lane Scheppele, Gabor Halmai, Angela Kocze are among the contributors whose work is familiar to followers of the Hungarian Spectrum. The volume indicates that, although a unified progressive oppositional movement or party has not yet found its form, new shoots of justice and democracy continue to burst forth from the not yet depleted soil of Hungarian political culture.

Nádas
Guest

Off topic, but topical: there’s an anti-anti-immigration poster making the rounds online. I’ve tried unsuccessfully to embed it here, and can’t find a link, either. It’s a photo of a small Arab girl carrying some large plastic water jugs, and the text reads: Te tényleg olyan segghülye vagy, akitől egy szír óvodás el tudja lopni a munkáját?

[“Are you really so butt-stupid that a Syrian pre-schooler could steal your job?”]

Guest

Re: “The volume indicates that, although a unified progressive oppositional movement or party has not yet found its form, new shoots of justice and democracy continue to burst forth from the not yet depleted soil of Hungarian political culture”

Thanks for the reference. I certainly will be looking for it. I’d think it should be essential reading for all who are concerned about where Magyarorszag is going especially with the country’s institutions and how the population relates to her and the world outside. There’s a big, changing world out there that needs to be engaged. Hopefully, the country will actively come to grips with it. Better that than dragged in kicking and screaming.

Richard P. Ray
Guest
Wow, Hungary and football can get the juices flowing. @wolfi, I have been doing what I do here in Hungary for the past 7 years: making a living, paying taxes, swimming in Balaton, going to the wine festival, theatre, etc. I feel that I am making an impact here in Hungary by doing what I do very well, not by holding up signs and marching but by talking with friends and colleagues and learning 1 to 1. In another American sport, baseball, it’s called “small ball”, making less spectacular plays, but in the end, winning the game. I like it here and will continue to play the small game indefinitely. @Petofi, I love your answer because it is so Hungarian: I am not a Hungarian therefore I know nothing about Hungary. I say something that is not in line with the blog and I am a Putin troll. Dude, really? @Kormos sorry for the misspelling, of course it should be Richard, I have told Ms. Balogh via email that I appreciate her writing previously and will continue reading her blog in the future. @JonVanTil I am looking forward to the book, yes I get the irony of the title. I… Read more »
Webber
Guest
Dear Richard – I, too, found your first note odd. Allow me to explain why: This is a political blog, not a page promoting Hungary to tourists, nor a government propaganda organ. If you want positive news, you can find it easily enough in material designed to attract tourists to Hungary, or on government run websites. But don’t expect positive news on an independent blog about the political situation in Hungary, because there isn’t a heck of a lot of it. I assume you don’t speak Hungarian. I assume, also, that you are not a social scientist. If my assumptions are correct, your odd note needs no more explanation. What’s going on in politics in Hungary is not evident to people who don’t speak Hungarian – it can’t be. In my view, Eva’s analysis is generally cautious, and based on verifiable information. It is extraordinarily solid. Because her analysis is based on verifiable information, Eva does not mention quite a lot of foul things that have happened and continue to happen to little people in Hungary – (such as people being fired by their employers, or harassed by various authorities because of views they have expressed in public) – things… Read more »
Member
I can understand your point of view perfectly as I also lived in Hungary and saw how someone like yourself can be influenced by romancing your pants off so to speak. This is a political blog, it is not about the beautiful people, the culture, the countryside, Budapest or how wonderful life can be for someone who is there to experience it all, and has the finances to do so. Politically speaking only…..Hungary is in shambles. The people are being lied to day and night by the government, they are being controlled by media and fear tactics and they are being stolen from. There is corruption in every facet of business and government in Hungary. Politically speaking there is not a lot of positive for Eva to write about. The only solution to the problems in Hungary is for the government to change. There is a huge need for new players in the political scene and this is not happening quick enough for the 2018 elections I’m afraid. People need to show the government that they cannot be bullied, that tolerance toward corruption is over and the government needs a little fear of its people at this point. You might… Read more »
petofi
Guest
Ricardo, I am living in Budapest but I had the immense foresight to accompany my parents in 1956 when I was seven to the wonderland of Canada. Luckily, I was educated there, too, and grew up in its modern, much-less oppressive society. Sad to say, in a moment of foolish, big-heared, romanticism, I thought that it would be grand to return to Hungary and the children of those who gave my father–then a cavalry-man–a free trip to Bergen Belsen. Inspite of the beauties of Budapest, and the wonderful fruits and vegetables to be had, I’ve bitterly regretted my return. But the reason why foreigners failure to understand the Hungarian reality is precisely because it is so far removed from practical, modern experience. The Hungarian mindset is a whole nether world of angst, envy, and irremedial anti-semitism. As well, Hungarians are lazy and want what others have without working for it. Thus, Orban is not seen as a ‘crook’, but as a highly successful businessman they all wish to emulate. It is all quite impossible to comprehend unless you were born a Hungarian. Foreign misconceptions are not based on stupidity or lack of intelligence–normal people can’t fathom the degree of depravity… Read more »
Guest
Re: ‘the Hungarian mindset is a whole nether world of angst, envy and it remedial anti-semitism’ Way back in another nostalgic time where things ‘red’ were the big thing I visited my ancestral land. My uncle took me around and showed me this iron object in a nice verdant area. It was obviously a Russian monument of some sort. I thought it interesting that a U.S. kid at the time was hanging out under it. Now looking back on that I got the impression my uncle was trying to say something to me but never noted where or what his relationship was toward it. To this day I am not sure why he took me there. Was it to show an occupier’s best? Was it to simply show me the popular sites there? Or was it finally his way of saying look look see what we have become? I have to say Magyarorszag may have all those negative characteristics noted above. On the other hand, what I also see is a country and a people that have been psychologically scarred to their detriment in developing successful relationships with themselves and with the world. It’s like some devious alteration has occurred… Read more »
exTor
Guest
Notwithstanding the genteel delivery, Richard P Ray, your first post is an insult to Éva Balogh. Your basic position is: Let’s forget about the bad and focus on the good. [“… stop telling me what is wrong and start telling me what is right …”] A 1950s Georgia, United States analog could be: “Stop worrying about your civil rights, boy. Look at these wonderful peaches here.” What is it that you’re not getting, RP Ray? In a subsequent post you state that you are “not a Hungarian”, which may mean that you were not born in Hungary and also that you have no familial ties to the country. In other words, you do not (readily) speak Hungarian. You may be a Brit [“theatre”], however your ref to American ‘smart ball’, a baseball term, seems to belie my initial nationality thought. Pegging you as a Putinite was misguided. Let’s just peg you as naive, as in Bobby McFerrin’s ‘Don’t Worry, Be Happy’. Doesn’t the fact that Viktor Orbán actually agreed to an interview with Zsolt Bayer, that out-and-out vile racist further to the right than even VO, mean anything to you? That is the equivalent of Barack Obama sitting down to… Read more »
Richard P. Ray
Guest
Honestly didn’t mean to generate so much…feeling. I fully realize that this is a political blog, I am not a tourist looking for sunshine and my pants have remained firmly fastened to my waist, Liz. I understand the hard side of big ciites having grown up in Detroit and Houston. As I stated before, I work here. My wife’s family lives here, they lost everything after the war and slowly clawed their way back. Uncle had to leave in 56. However, I have obviously mis-stated myself somehow so that the contributors have inferred that I don’t understand the true situation here. I understand it pretty well. Perhaps what I should have said, is simply that in order to move on, some serious action needs to be taken. I get it. While I am not a social scientist (thanks Webber) I can grasp concepts of institutional transfer, re-militarization, demographics of minority migrations and urbanism. I’ve worked in other places in worse shape (little comfort to everyone here). My issue with the sliding translation was the article on the “sports as education” speech. I interpreted the speech to say that use of the methods in sports to educate can be used successfully,… Read more »
exTor
Guest

Well, let me drop my bonafides, Richard Ray. A quarter century of sports: football (not ‘foci’), rugby, kickboxing. A few years of university, however not enough courses to graduate. A dozen years as a firefighter (Toronto).

You stated that you played baseball and are –were ???– a profesor, as if that validated your views. You misspelled your name and “misstated [yourself] somehow” on the first goround. Then you backpedaled.

None of the other ‘bonafides’ that you proferred are of any worth in the sense that they are necessary prerequisites for ‘getting it’ re Viktor Orbán.

The only necessity is the willingness and ability to be empathetic. Many people are being hurt, the carefully crafted image of Orbán notwithstanding. Many stand to be hurt further. Orbán is sliding –rightly so– and he is moving to the right to shore up his support. And to the right is that repository of racism, Jobbik, which is actively antiRoma and antisemitic.

I find it curious that a Yank spells ‘theater’ as a Brit would: ‘theatre’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Webber
Guest
On spelling – you have a sharp eye! Still, I wouldn’t read too much into the spelling of certain words 🙂 , because some people who have lived abroad (some Americans, anyway) use both American and British spelling depending on the situation, and use certain words or phrases depending on the audience. I know I do, because it makes communication easier. For instance: I say/write vest for a particular article of clothing when I’m communicating with Americans, but waistcoat if I’m communicating with Brits, for whom a vest is something altogether different. Another example: cheque/check – the first looks very wrong to an American, the second looks bad to a Brit. I generally think it’s silly to mix American and British spelling in a single narrative, but can imagine times when it is very right (reporting speech between an American and a Brit, for instance – why not use both spellings there?). Anyway, this language that divides us is a messy thing. Live and let live, I say! But then, in my childhood fiction from Britain wasn’t “translated” into American English (or vice versa – as I’ve seen in England) by publishers, and we were expected to read both American… Read more »
exTor
Guest

RP Ray’s ‘theatre’ spelling led me to believe that he’s a Brit, which I also am, but only by birth. Being Canadian-raised, I absorbed the Canadian mode of spelling, which tends to favor the British mode (excluding the execrable ‘ageing’ and ‘gaol’). I now favor American spelling, as in the spelling of the previous verb, however I still like certain Britishisms, eg: ‘judgement’, ‘cheque’, ‘storey’. Brit English is heavily influenced by French, hence the ‘our’ verbs (eg: ‘savour’), ‘our’ nouns (eg: ‘candour’), ‘re’ nouns (eg: ‘metre’).

My spelling is a compendium that has evolved. It incorporates a certain logic that may not be evident or even knowable to those who read it. I hold to no nation’s spelling exclusively. I like American ‘or’ verbs (eg: ‘labor’) because they hew to Latin, which I studied for two years in highschool.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Richard P. Ray
Guest

Webber and exTor,
I am American, that is from the US. How USA ever got the right to call themselves Americans I don’t know. However due to the demands of my job here in Hungary, mostly helping my colleagues write technical articles in English and reviewing technical articles submitted to European journals, my language has “evolved”. Depending on the Word template/spellchecker I am working in, or the conference venue, I must constantly “cross the line”. My friends from Ukraine, Poland, Romania, Slovenia and Hungary don’t seem to mind the occasional criss-cross and it is a challenge sometimes to clarify their English while not trampling on their personal writing style or ideas. It’s a delicate process. I have also learned to appreciate journal editors correcting my bad (uh-merican) English. In the technical world, English is the language of choice, I think mostly from the very strong roots in software and computing. I have struggled with my reviews of papers written by very excellent researchers from countries around Central Europe, trying to find a “Euro-Esperanto-English” that is compact enough to learn and effectively communicate with, yet rigorous enough to clearly explain difficult, abstract concepts.

Guest
On sports and ‘success’… As far as looking at some ‘good’ things I’ve always thought it would be great if Magyarorszag could perhaps reprise their spectacular efforts in the football world which occurred decades past. We know what they did to the British at Wembley eh? Chewed them up real good on the field. And consequently revolutionized the international football world. I’ve always thought it was Puskas et al who really ‘developed’ arguably the greatest league in the world, the English Premier League. Certainly the English looked up to the Magyars when it came to football. The Germans ,who won the recent Cup, I’d suggest are a good example of what happens when a country looks at where it is and sees where it wants to be and does all the things to get everybody on the same page when it comes to achieving goals. For them, winning the Cup was the holy grail. And so after doing much ‘leg’ work and getting everybody on board they were rewarded with a great result. But truly it was real hard work. Not saying this would definitely occur with Magyarorszag with football but it could be a start in getting the country… Read more »
Guest

Following this OT thread:
As a German who listened to rock music on AFN during the day and the BBC and Radio Luxemburg at night as a pupil I also got confused very early on …
But I think we all here can manage a few spelling “errors” (or should it be “mistakes”?) …

Now back to Orbán.Here`s again a heart warming comment on Fidesz’ latest crazyness:
https://congressofbaboons.wordpress.com/2015/06/04/when-the-hate-keeps-piling-on/

And re Puskás:

He was of German (Schwab) descent – like some others in that famous 50’s team, born as Franz Purczeld.

Guest

Re: ‘Fidesz crazyness’ and hatred

Had to go to the great ‘Bard’ on that. He has a knack for providing great insights. Mr.Orban I think needs to be careful.

‘Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself’

Henry VIII

MAGYARKOZÓ
Guest

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English-speaking_world#English_as_a_global_language

Interesting how this coursed, Richard. I am a language freak of major proportions, hence my posts to this thread.

English is the defacto prime language of most fields. The link attests to that primacy. It is my conceit as a poet that English (because of its ability to absorb) is the best language in which to write poetry. That NWS, most poetry is boring, but that is another issue.

I can only imagine the crisscross, as you put it, involved in your job. I have enough problems dealing with the Hungarian here one-to-one.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Guest
Re: And re Puskás: He was of German (Schwab) descent – like some others in that famous 50’s team, born as Franz Purczeld. You know I wasn’t aware of that. I always thought he was out and out ‘Magyar’. Too bad his football genes didn’t hit this place. We could use it! I mean we ‘re ‘ok’ and can play up to a certain level but until we inexorably ‘feel’ the essence and beauty of the game and be prepared to put all behind it we’ll always look to be also-rans. Something to work for within the running of the US program. And on the aftermath of the FIFA investigations I wonder if there will be serious repercussions against the US in international football both on and off the field as that football maven and ‘protector’ Sepp and some of his guys have run for the hills and will be employing lawyers. The rats have been flushed out at last. I don’t need to tell anybody here how memories never seem to fade away and perhaps revenge will be used to how do they say it ‘making them pay’. And on all that scores may look to be settled. hmmm..isn’t… Read more »
Webber
Guest

“Feeling” the game… It isn’t genetic, you know.
At the moment – with the possible exception of Dzsudzsák – the only game Hungarian football players can feel is the one called “bunda” (fixing matches).
Fidesz hasn’t done a thing to stop this sport – indeed, they’ve made it an art form.
If you want success in sports other than “bunda”, I suggest you stick with water polo, swimming, and rowing.
As to Germany and football – Germany got a lot of things right, not just football. In fact, I’d say football was the least important of those things. Get your economy straightened out and attack corruption (everywhere), and the football will surely improve. But to do that, you’ll need a new leading class I fear.
Until then, remember the scores 7-0 and 8-1. Those are records of a sort in football.

Webber
Guest

Also, why would there be any “revenge” against the US for Sepp Blatter’s troubles? Honestly, who gives a damn about him, other than his immediate family? Most of the people I know are giggling about his arrest. Nobody seems the least bit bothered.
If there were revenge of the sort you imagine, I imagine people will be prosecuted by and by for that, too, as that also is corruption. There’s surely more room in prison cells in Switzerland.

Rikard
Guest

Webber… thanks for your remarks…mine were kind of discussing my own country the U.S. So far we haven’t been hit by ‘fixing’ here.

Nice that you don’t think they’d be any revenge directed against the US after toppling the fiefdom and corruption in FIFA. Many many people gained much from all that. They will miss the gravy. If you think no one will bite back you are a very optimistic individual in the ways of the world! I have to say I am a bit more cynical. And anyway it’s probably another way to punch out the country with some more jabs on how we do things.

Webber
Guest

Rikard: Taking revenge against people who play a sport because of the actions of the police or justice department of the country they live in seems insane to me. I know it doesn’t seem crazy to other people, I just don’t understand their (il)logic.

Guest

Just a note on revenge or ‘reprisals’.

Back in October, lawyers for women football players filed a suit against FIFA where they charged that players would be punished by if they did not remove their names supporting legal action against the global sport federation on a demand for them to install temporary grass fields rather than artificial turf ones.

One player was told by the Mexican federation that she would be suspended from WC qualifiers because her name was on the suit supporter list. When she took off her name she got back on the team. The U.S. Football Federation president Sunil Gulati was also named in the ‘retaliation’ suit.

You know this retaliation by FIFA was about ‘fields’. What the U.S. busted up was cronyism, corruption and oodles oodles of dinero flowing like manna from heaven into global football fiefdoms. Right now I’d have to say many people do not like ‘the law’. We’ll see how ‘crazy’ they’ll be about it! …;-)…

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