Summary justice is coming within days: Viktor Orbán’s brave new world

The amazing thing about Viktor Orbán is his ability to sound utterly reasonable, even though we all know that his behavior in the past months has been anything but exemplary. A good example of his dexterous handling of politically dangerous issues was the press conference that he and Manfred Webber, leader of the parliamentary caucus of the European People’s Party, gave this afternoon. His recent line of argument is that he and his government are obeying the rules laid down by the European Union. These rules require that asylum seekers be registered in the first EU country in which they set foot. The migrants who arrive in Hungary already reached the European Union in Greece, and the Greek government acted illegally when it let the refugees go without registering them. On the other hand, Hungary has been judiciously fulfilling its obligations to the letter of the law and has been trying to register everybody.

While Hungary is a law-abiding member of the European community, other countries and Brussels itself have changed the rules of the game without the approval of the European Council of prime ministers. It is basically Germany’s fault that Hungary is experiencing difficulties. And instead of being praised for its efforts, it is being maligned for its allegedly inhumane treatment of the refugees when in fact the Hungarian government is taking good care of them. Because of the failure of the EU to handle the crisis, Hungary, overwhelmed by the onslaught of migrants, must take extraordinary measures to defend its borders.

Doesn’t that sound reasonable? Eminently so, if we didn’t know that the Hungarian government has repeatedly been offered help in handling the registration of refugees at the border, which the Hungarian government has refused to accept. The reason for the refusal is most likely Orbán’s reluctance to allow outsiders to have any say in what Orbán considers an exclusively Hungarian affair. Letters from various agencies offering help were left unanswered, and the United Nation’s Refugee Agency had to wait for weeks for “permission” to send some badly needed tents. We also know that neither relief agencies nor human rights advocates can enter the premises of the registration centers where conditions are rapidly deteriorating. As is the physical and mental well-being of the refugees. An immense amount of money was allocated to Hungary from the EU budget to care for and process the asylum seekers, and only recently Orbán managed to receive another four million euros. Yet, as we know, the government has little to show for this money.

Instead, the Hungarian government is focusing all its efforts on keeping the refugees out of Hungary, not in protecting them. The law that makes illegal border crossing a criminal act took effect on August 1 is in contravention of the Geneva Convention’s rules, which apply in times of armed conflict and seek to protect people who are not taking part in the hostilities. And most likely as of September 15 the refugees will face an even worse situation because, from that date on, a state of emergency will be declared.

On September 4 Sándor Pintér, minister of interior, sent parliament the government’s proposals for the imposition of “a special legal order” to be introduced on September 15. A state of “special legal order” is a state of emergency in which “the exercise of fundamental rights with some exceptions can be suspended,” according to the Hungarian Constitution. These proposals–contained in a 12-page legal text–are available on the parliament’s website. We’ve already discussed some of the provisions, but there are more that should be highlighted.

First, a couple of non-judicial observations. According to the Hungarian police, yesterday Hungarian authorities caught 3,601 people who came across the so-called “green border.” Hungary will probably see similarly high numbers in the next couple of days, especially given the looming threat of the state of emergency with an entirely new set of rules applicable to those seeking refuge.

The 3.5-4.5 m fence is nowhere, although they are working on a gate across the railroad tracks which, I assume, will be closed except when a train is approaching. I understand that the army will not be sent to the border until September 22, perhaps because joint American-Hungarian military exercises will be held in the interim.

After September 15 everyone who is caught crossing the border illegally will be jailed and prosecuted. Justice will be summary. The emphasis will be on speed. All cases will be heard by the Szegedi Járásbíróság and Szegedi Törvényszék. The “járásbíróság” has 12 judges who handle criminal cases and the “törvényszék” has 14. All cases will have to be handled within 15 days if there was no eyewitness to the crime and within 8 days if there was. Of course, we have no idea how many people will run the risk of crossing the Hungarian border after the 15th. But the proposals are designed to cope with “hordes.” One way to speed up the process is not to bother with the rather lengthy, complicated hearings minors are entitled to. So, youngsters under the age 18 will be subject to the same procedural laws as adults. I assume that the 12-year-old who drifted away from his parents and got under the fence alone will be charged, prosecuted, and jailed.

travesty

I have no idea where those who are waiting for their day in court will be kept. Will the refugee camps be turned into holding cells? I wonder what the European Union will think of that idea.

Another time- and money-saving idea is that neither the refugees’ indictments nor the verdicts in their cases will be translated from Hungarian into either their mother tongue or English. During the proceedings they will have interpreters and court-ordered defense lawyers, but these “amenities” are expensive so the judges will make sure that the trials are speedy. János Lázár’s understanding is that hundreds of cases will be adjudicated a day. Apparently, again for the sake of speed, the courts will move out to the border and will hear the cases in trailers.

I do hope that the European Union will find a way to do something before this law takes effect because it is not only unconstitutional according to Hungarian law but also contrary to the stipulations of the Geneva Convention, to which Hungary is a signatory. The court proceedings are going to be a travesty of justice, which the civilized world shouldn’t tolerate.

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
gdfxx
Guest

According to a VOA report all migrants from Serbia to Hungary are avoiding being registered as refugees in Hungary.

http://www.voanews.com/content/spike-in-number-of-refugees-reaching-austria-hungary/2955099.html

According to EU laws Hungary is supposed to register them, that was the cost of becoming a country within the Schengen agreement. That is why the border between Hungary and the rest of the Schengen countries is open.

Austria is sending mixed messages. One day they tell Hungary to send the migrants, the next day they threaten to close the border.

It turns out that the migrants’ desire to all go to Germany was triggered by a twitter message by a low level German bureaucrat that got out by mistake.

I hear a lot of criticism about what is going on, but no concrete suggestions on what should be done.

To provide a decent transit center for tens of thousands of migrants (three thousands a day or more) a few million euros is a drop in the bucket. Who is supposed to pay for that and what happens with the migrants in the mean time?

I am far from being a fan of Orban. But what exactly are the Hungarian authorities supposed to do with this situation?

LwiiH
Guest

How about act humanly. Have you actually seen the conditions theses people are forced to be in? Have you been there? My guess is ont. These statements on the surface look very reasonable but if you think for a minute you can can see the problem. They are mean spirited. It is remarkable that the Hungarians that have not been sucked in by the one sided propoganda they’ve been feed have helped every way they can. But individuals can only do so much and even that becomes limited when they are no longer allowed to enter these zones and thses zones are moved to remote locations. 4 million euros could go a long way in helping with registration but no, let’s do the “reasonable” thing, the mean thing and build a fence.

Nádas
Guest
I think you’re right, gdfxx. Hungary was caught very much in the middle by its Schengen obligations (which Greece apparently is allowed to forgo). Last winter and spring, Austrian police were turning back migrants at the border, and German police were patrolling the Keleti station in Budapest. At the time, most migrants were Kosovars fleeing a hopeless economic situation, and were arriving at a rate of “only” 200 or so a day. Of course, the Orbán government’s heartless, ham-fisted, too-little-too-late attempt to manage the problem only aggravated the situation. Although religious charities have been conspicuous in their absence, many Hungarian individuals have stepped up and helped where and when they could, and they should not be tarred with the same brush as the Fidesz/Jobbik zombie nation, whose sentiments, it should be noted, are echoed in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland and Romania. But now our Mr. Orbán is suggesting there is light at the end of the tunnel in the form of a €3 billion EU “Syria aid package” that would go to Syria’s immediate neighbors, Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan to keep the migrants there, even as those countries are already overwhelmed with refugees from Iraq and Syria. I think… Read more »
Webber
Guest
There is no doubt that more aid is needed for the refugee camps, particularly in Turkey. The UN recently admitted that it had not done enough. According to some reports, new arrivals are crammed into tents that are already full, and some camps in Turkey do not even have enough food for the enormous numbers of refugees who have surged across the border (note: I am not saying this is Turkey’s fault – the situation is grave). As it gets colder, the humanitarian crisis will grow more grave. The US could send more funding – not because it has not already sent a lot, but because it is a humanitarian catastrophe. Moreover, if conditions in camps are too awful, people there will be radicalized. But it is the EU countries who, first of all, should send much more aid in the form of funds, tents, food, medicine, etc (where is the common EU fp on this issue?). Among EU countries, the onus is on Germany above all. Aid is urgently needed, because either refugees are cared for in camps, or those who are mobile will risk everything to get to Germany, which they regard as the nearest safe haven. To… Read more »
Nádas
Guest

You’re right, even if camps are set up in Turkey, it’s hard to see how such a massive human tide can be prevented from moving on. And apparently things have already turned ugly at times for refugees in Turkey. And it also gets extremely cold in eastern Turkey in the winter.

Right now there’s a lot of finger-pointing at the U.S. for having broken up Iraq with such disastrous consequences, and for not helping to take down the Al-Assad regime in Syria, when America had no qualms about overthrowing either Saddam or Qaddafi in Libya.

Webber
Guest

The finger-pointing is self-contradictory:
“The Saddam regime was awful, but… It was stupid of the US to destroy the Saddam regime. Because of American intervention the country fell into chaos, and sectarian violence.” (Because you can only keep Iraq out of chaos with a strong, authoritarian rule, supposedly – implicitly, according to this argument, anyway)
“Stupid US didn’t destroy the Assad regime, didn’t occupy Syria, and the country fell into chaos.”
You can’t have it both ways.
I, for one, grow mightily tired of everything being blamed on the US.

Nádas
Guest

I think you’ve contradicted yourself. Saddam was in fact the lynchpin that held Iraq together, as bad as he was. That should be obvious. The invasion and its aftermath made a bad situation infinitely worse. And it was a war crime to boot.

Arab societies are still quite patriarchal. As ideas of participatory democracy filter into their world, it will be (or would have been) up to them to make the changes to their countries and to an ancient way of life.

Of course it is not entirely America’s fault, but who knows how much or how little of the chaos now reigning in the Middle East would have come to pass if not for the ill-advised invasion.

Webber
Guest

You missed my point – If you make that argument about Iraq (I don’t mind if you do – it is logical), then you should probably also logically agree with Russia that Assad should (have been) supported, not undermined (the US did provide something to rebels, you know). Russia says chaos comes where Assad loses.
You can’t very well say Assad should be overthrown by the US if you say Saddam should not have been.
For eternal critics, it is the best situation possible – if the US overthrows Assad, it is guilty for what comes after. If the US does not overthrow Assad, it is in a way responsible for doing nothing about the crimes of the regime, or for (not) stopping the advance of ISIS.
In this situation, I personally fully agree with current US policy vis-a-vis Syria: hit ISIS where possible. Provide support to certain friendly rebel groups in Syria. Leave the Assad regime alone, whether to be fully overthrown, or to hang on in certain areas where it can.

szegedi
Guest
Webber
Guest

From an Iraqi (as in the WP story) fair enough!
But from a Brit, Australian, Canadian – slow down.
Overall more than 300,000 Iraqis have moved to the US. If the fellow in that story applies to go to the States as a refugee, I hope he, too, is admitted.

Deakista
Guest

I think, really huge resources are needed to defeat the Khamenei/Putin regimes which caused this refugee crisis.

Nádas
Guest

Iran and Russia? Are you sober?

Deakista
Guest

Nice try.

To defend the Iran/Russia line, you are trying to raise doubts.

While Iran/Russia are keeping the Assad regime alive, against the will of Syria, on life support.

Member

I agree with you on this, Putin has been supplying Syria with weapons, and is backing the Iranians as well, he has been sitting back working hard with them in the background while EVERYTHING the US does is out in the open and widely reported. I think there is Russian hands in this, they just like to see the US take the fall for all of it. I am not saying that the US is not at fault to some degree, but I do think Russias role will come to light in the future.

coop ITES
Guest

One religious group that has been active in Hungary is Szim Salom. If you want to make a donation from the US or other countries outside Hungary, they are a good choice because you can donate to them via PayPal. See
http://www.friendsofsimshalom.org/

Guest
gdfxx September 11, 2015 at 7:13 pm I would say that the logical thing would have been to get together with the Austrians and Germans as early as May this year to work out a rational solution, as soon as intelligence became available about the impending human avalanche. It seems to me that Schengen or no Schengen, and Dublin or no Dublin, it would have been best to establish one very large central reception center right on the Serbian border, capable of handling up to 10,000 arrivals per day, and arrange for an appropriate number of trains per day, to take all arrivals straight to Vienna or Munich. Registration could have then taken place on the trains on the way to Vienna or Munich, at least for those who were prepared to register, and the passengers would have been supplied with decent amounts of food and drink. Those who were not prepared to register would have become the Austrians’ or German’s problem. The cost of the operation would have been covered by EU, UN and German funds, and there would have been no need whatsoever to build a fence between Serbia and Hungary. The irritant of contact between the refugees… Read more »
Nádas
Guest

This would have been a logical response, but remember, Austria and Germany didn’t want the migrants back in May. This mess can’t be laid entirely at Orbán’s feet.

Guest
Nádas September 12, 2015 at 4:40 pm I agree. Nonetheless, even if the Austrians were not agreeable to come to the party back in May, negotiations should at least have been started with them very promptly, then completed as soon as feasible. In the meantime, the very large capacity reception camp should have been set up south of Szeged post haste, by at least the middle of June, and daily transportation of the arrivals to the Austrian border commenced without delay, with on-train registration of those who were prepared to be registered. The refugees would have got off the trains at the Hegyeshalom/Neue Teilung border crossing, or somewhere reasonably nearby, then walk across to Austria and either camp out on Austrian territory or picked up by the Austrians. In these circumstances the Austrians (and especially the Germans) would no doubt have quickly buckled under and come to the party re orderly transportation of the arrivals onward to Germany and Sweden. But even in the interim, the refugees would have instantly become an Austrian, rather than Hungarian headache and responsibility, the fence on the Serbian border would have been completely unnecessary, the irritant of contact between the refugees and the Hungarian… Read more »
Reality Check
Guest

A small bright spot in all the szar.

From the FB page of the Budapest Beacon: “Hungarian Democratic Coalition politician Szabolcs Kerék-Bárczy says both the government and the Catholic Church of Hungary have failed the test arising from the European refugee crisis.”

https://video-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hvideo-xta1/v/t43.1792-2/12012862_1175558049127433_603551359_n.mp4?efg=eyJybHIiOjE1MDAsInJsYSI6NDA5Nn0%3D&rl=1500&vabr=395&oh=55538bf9b29bba4ae033f7d4a6fd0fa9&oe=55F37E6F

dos929
Guest

It is not only the refugees wanting to leave Hungary, but more and more Hungarian citizens as well, because life under the Orbán regime becomes intolerable due to their actions of bringing back all that was bad under the Horthy and Rakosi regimes. These brainless bustards of the FIDESZ care about not their country and their fellow citizens, but only about their own well being. The refugee crisis to them is no more than another opportunity to show how much they care about the so called Hungarian independence, the term that is no longer exists in the 21st century, at least not the way that Orbán’s sick mind imagines it. Soon we will have concentration camps as well??????

Webber
Guest

Be patient, Comrade! As soon as the southern border is fenced and secure, The Party will erect a new fence to protect the western border, and will reduce traffic to the decadent West.
Go east, young Hungarians!

Member

I was thinking exactly the same. I thought, it will will not take long before Orban keep continue wit the fence under the prettiness of “protecting the nation”, and will not allow Hungarians to leave.

Guest

I’ve been joking about this too – but there are not enough jobs in Hungary and reintroducing border checks would surely reduce tourism too and probably also make German companies (and others too of course) think twice about investing in and buying from Hungary.
That would be really bad for the Hungarian economy – a return not to Kádár times but to Rakosi times …

Tal
Guest

During exceptional legal orders, during martial law there is no such thing as a constitution.

Orban is the sovereign who alone decides when to introduce an extraordinary legal order and what rules to apply during such times.

Given that the Constitutional Court is fully packed with partizan fideszniks and the court’s penchant for politicking what I can imagine is that the court will declare part of these rules unconstitutional but only pro futuro (ie. will only apply to those refugees who arrive after the date of the court resolution). If the court takes its time Orban can get away with many months of such legal order. Moreover, Orban will be fully informed about any potential such court resolution and will prepare to amend the constitution etc. to immediately react.

Orban cannot be legally defeated, the EU is too stupid for that.

Nádas
Guest

There’s already “no such thing as a constitution.” Literally.

Webber
Guest
The new law, when it is put into effect, will soon prove to be just another law that cannot be enforced. It is laughable. Let’s ignore the humanitarian aspect, and simply concentrate on the logistics: Yesterday more than 3,000 people were caught crossing illegally. Let’s say, just for the sake of argument, that that was an unusually busy day, and that the average over the year will be less. So, let’s say that on the first day, some 2,000 refugees are caught and sent to prison to await trial. The next day, another 2,000. The next day, another. Etc. Over the course of the year, that is 730,000 people. How many empty cells are there? Even if this number of people can be accommodated, how quickly can the courts get to them? There is already a serious backlog of Hungarian citizens waiting to appear before court for various offenses. How much time will it take for the courts to handle an additional 730,000 people? Let’s say, for the sake of argument, that a miracle occurs and the courts actually can handle that many people within a short time. In accordance with the law, the majority of these people should then… Read more »
Reality Check
Guest

Detention will be in the camps, not in prison cells. So, the refugee camps will in reality be detention centers.

D7 Democrat (@D7Democrat)
Guest

f you have faced ISIS or the Taleban in your own country, I can’t imagine Orban’s tinpot army are going to hold much fears for you. He kicks you out, you will try and try again. If it weren’t for the humanitarian aspect it would be actually fun to see another of his crackpot schemes explode in the sadist dictator’s face.

Nali
Guest

Don’t forget that Simicskó is now asking volunteer reservists to come forward and join the forces patrolling the fence. There were lots of mercenaries from Hungary in the Yugoslav war, so I guess the trigger happy set will join the army to contribute to the solving of the ‘troubles’.

Webber
Guest

Slightly OT – but directly related to the illegal crossing of borders!
Pester Lloyd has published the list of those banned from visiting the US. Note, the rankings after the names are poetic inventions of my own, and have nothing to do with reality…:
Giro-Szasz (capo)
Habony (consigliere)
Heim (consigliere)
Lazar (capo famiglia)
Sesztak (capo bastone)
Vida (capo)
All of them can visit the US if they travel with valid diplomatic passports. They will only be stopped if they travel with ordinary passports.
So, again, the question arises; if the photo of Habony in the States was not photo-shopped but is real, then apparently he has a diplomatic passport. But the government of Hungary, and the Prime Minister himself have said that Habony is not employed in any manner by the government or Prime Minister’s office. Who gave Habony a diplomatic passport, and why? By what right?
If Habony was, in fact, able to enter the US with an ordinary passport, this means that protection of American borders AT AIRPORTS is inadequate. All US citizens should be deeply concerned by this. It’s a matter of national security.

Webber
Guest

P.S. I’m not an expert in American law, but if Habony illegally crossed the US border, couldn’t he have been, shouldn’t he have been apprehended, held, processed, and deported?

Guest

You’re right – it even happens to people on ESTA (aka VWP = Visa Waiver Program). If there’s something wrong with your data, you’re sent back immediately and can’t visit the USA again.
The rules are very strict – this just happened to a young woman who told the immigration officer she came to baby sit her cousin’s children. That was considered “work” which is not allowed so she was sent back …

So to me it’s obvious that Habony has a diplomatic passport.

PS:
I’ve heard some strange stories about Fidesz people and forged passports being given out to important guys (with false names ?) but of course these are only rumours …

Guest

Re Orbán’s interview with the German BILD – maybe Eva should write a post on it?
http://www.t-online.de/nachrichten/ausland/eu/id_75398322/orban-will-fluechtlinge-dahin-zurueckschicken-wo-sie-herkamen-.html
He says something like:
” Es gibt kein Grundrecht auf ein besseres Leben”

There is no basic right for a better life …
So shouldn’t all those Hungarians who left for the richer countries return or be sent home – then we would have enough room in Germany etc for half a million people …
This guy is so ridiculous – he should tell that to his fellow countrymen!

Member

But he does tell this to his fellow countrymen. Of course he is telling them now, and with so many different words. It is not the Orban of the late 80s who wanted the borders open, freedom, truth, democracy and opportunity for all. Everything he supposedly fought for he turned his back on when it became inconvenient for him. Now we have a whole nation that follows, and applauds him. Read the blog, even from outside Hungary, those who got out, hoping for a better life come on this blog, and scream it out to the whole wide world that whatever Orban does is great. Even those who do not agree with him in so many ways, as soon as there is sliver of idea Orban comes up with they start to post what genius ideas he has.

István
Guest
Let me start by saying this will by necessity be an extensive post and in writing it I want to emphasize my profound respect for Eva’s humanitarian intent of her essay. Eva writes: “The law that makes illegal border crossing a criminal act took effect on August 1 is in contravention of the Geneva Convention’s rules, which apply in times of armed conflict and seek to protect people who are not taking part in the hostilities.” Eva makes a second reference to the Geneva Convention at the conclusion of her essay. I had the unfortunate task of being forced to study the Convention in relation to the drafting of The US Army Regulation 190-8 (AR 190-8) which is used when a captive’s legal status is in doubt, and therefore a tribunal under Article 5 of the Geneva Conventions is required. The regulation spells out the procedures the U.S. military must follow to determine a captive’s legal status as a combatant or non-combatant. These issues are extremely complex. Eva is in so many respects brilliant and hence I found it shocking that she made this reference to the Convention’s rules as somehow being applicable to the Fidesz/Jobbik laws making unauthorized border… Read more »
spectator
Guest

I suppose that the reason may lay here, and may this why Orbán insist on changing the definition of the asylum seekers from ‘refugee’ to ‘economic migrants’:

Convention
Relating to the Status of Refugees

Article 31
Refugees unlawfully in the country of refugee

The Contracting States shall not impose penalties, on account of their illegal entry or presence, on refugees who, coming directly from a territory where their life or freedom was threatened in the sense of article 1, enter or are present in their territory without authorization, provided they present themselves without delay to the authorities and show good cause for their illegal entry or presence.
The Contracting States shall not apply to the movements of such refugees restrictions other than those which are necessary and such restrictions shall only be applied until their status in the country is regularized or they obtain admission into another country. The Contracting States shall allow such refugees a reasonable period and all the necessary facilities to obtain admission into another country.

Guest

@István
September 12, 2015 at 9:44 am

Thank you for clarifying the issue. You obviously have a very impressive grasp of it.

Member

@spectator
September 12, 2015 at 10:23 am

Thank you for clarifying the issue. You obviously have a very impressive grasp of it.

And your heart — like Éva’s — is obviously in the right place. Ferreting out technicalities — there always are some — in which the letter of the law seems to excuse the inexcusable is the M.O. of Orban and his hand-picked army of amoral attorneys (the corrupt attorney-general P.P. being among the worst of them).

An
Guest
Index has a very interesting article about Orban’s political rationale in the refugee crisis. Orban is gambling that public sentiment will turn against the refugees even in the West if the refugees keep arriving in such larger numbers. He thinks his harsh policies will be vindicated at that point. He really thinks he can be the the savior of Europe and Europe will soon come to recognize this. He has planned this out. According to February (!) poll numbers by Eurobarometer, in the EU 57% of the population does not welcome immigrants from third world countries, and in Hungary this number was 67% in February. By now this number is probably higher in Hungary (and Orban’s anti-immigrant propaganda campaign is fueling this sentiment, as well). He doesn’t care about the clashes with Western politicians because he thinks they, too, will soon have to turn to a harsher tone if they want to be reelected. Orban is an unscrupulous populist, and his calculations may actually bear out in this case. At the same time, his bold anti-immigration stance reinvigorated him and his support within Fidesz. http://index.hu/belfold/2015/09/11/orban_fel_van_villanyozva_es_hiszi_hogy_igaza_van/ Domestically, I think, he is definitely winning. The refugee question is even dividing his opposition.… Read more »
spectator
Guest

Looks pretty much to me that Orbán and co. will use t‘rapid response’ judicial procedures to be able “lawfully” expel the refugees.
Since passing over the fence going to be criminal offence, consequently, the offenders going to be convicted, no doubt.
One of the reasons why admittance can be denied is when the person “having been convicted by a final judgment of a particularly serious crime”

Now you see, that the real purpose of the fence isn’t its (nonexistent) stopping effect, but it’s ‘legal’ power.
Being there already enough.

spectator
Guest

Before you started wondering, what kind of improvement the going to come out of that billions of EU-aid regarding the refugee crisis, those ‘clever’ boys running (amok) the country already find the way how to put their hands on some of the funds:

http://mandiner.hu/cikk/20150911_migraciokutato_intezetet_alapit_a_szazadveg_es_az_mcc

I couldn’t ever come up with such sleek solution myself, so, salutation to the talented!
Conmen, that is..

Guest
spectator
Guest
In what aspect, Mike? Being a decent human has no other alternative. There is no “but” applicable here. If it wasn’t for the individuals, the helpfulness of the civilians, the understanding of a few individual policemen, “the Hungarians” just as well resign from called ‘humans’ – en gros. The “Hungarian State” as entity under the present government has proved to be totally inadequate to handle the situation, proved to be in total lack of humanitarian empathy, even understanding what “human compassion” could mean..! Your Instagram link has a heartwarming image, but when you read the comment of an allegedly “Hungarian girl”, you’ll face immediately with her blaming the refugees for their behaviour. Not once she, or anybody likeminded ever appeared to consider the physical and mental state of the people after thousands of miles of dreadful journey, when they blaming them being “impatient” and “short tempered” – among other things. And no, parroting the Orbanist phrase “its their fault, they shouldn’t have came” won’t change the fact, that they are here and they are just as worthy HUMAN BEINGS as anybody else, who not only deserve civilised human treatment, but have every right to such, as well! The post of… Read more »
Guest

For those who can read German the moving story of a young Syrian woman and her Christian (!) family who came 16 years ago to Germany – at first they did not get asylum, the German authorities didn’t believe their story – but with the help of the local church in Germany they could stay …
She was 13 years old and didn’t speak one word of German when she came – now she’s working on her PhD thesis …
http://www.tagblatt.de/Home/nachrichten/tuebingen_artikel,-Fabronia-Murad-Vom-syrischen-Fluechtlingskind-zur-Promotion-_arid,317455.html

D7 Democrat (@D7Democrat)
Guest
Ok, an interesting story from one of the “transit” zones where I occasionally work. I noticed that the blankets are high quality, recognisable from a particular multi. Similarly aid in terms of medicine and personal hygiene products was more than enough to cope with the demand in the specific place where I was helping out. I mentioned this, and yes, certain of Hungarian and international companies have been secretly coming to the plate to do their humanitarian duty for those most deserving. But why “secretly”? This is where you will shake your head. Or maybe not, when I confirm that Orbán and the rest of his lapdog regime are, indeed, scum. The sadist nazi presently lording over our nation has made it abundantly clear to those that matter that any multi or indeed Hungarian company seen publicly helping the refugees will be hammered, be it at their tax inspection or when the fascist regime next “reviews” budget measures to pay for a stadium or a statue. Positive, that despite this, the companies have one their duty and despite the best efforts of the Fidesz filth, peoples’ lives have been saved. Because of their efforts, there are babies and kids living… Read more »
tappanch
Guest

“particular multi” = IKEA ?

IKEA said publicly that they would give away x thousand blankets to the refugees.

petofi
Guest

IKEA is too big a fish to fry…even if they got out the communal, Felcsutian pan they use on Friday nights to prepare canine morsels to enjoy beside their homebrew palinka, and the recorded vitalities of Danko-

petofi
Guest

–I just scrolled through the top 400 universities of the world…and there wasn’t even a whiff of a Hungarian establishment…

–All Hungarian politicians attended Hungarian universities (if they got that high)

–Ergo, the lump sum of idiocy when the House is sitting must be like a mushroom cloud…

wpDiscuz