The Hungarian right-wing media’s attack on the United States and its ambassador, Colleen Bell

Right after Viktor Orbán’s last Friday morning radio interview on October 30, when he mentioned George Soros’s name in connection with civil activists’ work with the asylum seekers, one of the many headlines on the topic read: “Viktor Orbán has taken aim at George Soros instead of Colleen Bell.” The journalist was wrong. Viktor Orbán ordered an attack on both.

A couple of days ago I covered in broad outline the attack on George Soros. And earlier I reported on U.S. Ambassador Colleen Bell’s speech, which seemed to have come as a surprise to the Hungarian government. Or at least this was the impression government propaganda tried to convey. Slowly, however, the truth has come out. Bell informed Jenő Megyesy, Viktor Orbán’s American-Hungarian adviser, about the kind of speech she would be delivering at Corvinus University. Moreover, as it turned out, Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó and Ambassador Bell frequently consult by phone, sometimes several times a week. Surely, the American position couldn’t have been a secret to either the officials of the ministry of foreign affairs or the prime minister’s office.

Only two important government officials commented on the speech: Péter Szijjártó and János Lázár, head of the prime minister’s office. Both accused the United States of meddling in another country’s internal affairs when it calls the Hungarian government’s attention to its abandonment of democratic norms. But does the United States transgress the boundary of diplomatic rules when such criticism is leveled against Hungary? Not at all. Here I would like to thank Professor Kim Scheppele for calling my attention to the Moscow Document. In 1991 all member states of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe agreed to the following statement: “The participating States emphasize that issues relating to human rights, fundamental freedoms constitutes one of the foundations of the international order. They categorically and irrevocably declare that the commitments undertaken in the field of the human dimension of the CSCE are matters of direct and legitimate concern to all participating States and do not belong exclusively to the internal affairs of the State concerned.” Hungary was a signatory to this document.

Even if government officials try to ignore references to Colleen Bell’s speech, instructions surely have reached the new government media. As we know from the new editor-in-chief of Magyar Nemzet, before the falling out between Orbán and Simicska its staff was instructed by the government, sometimes twice weekly, about the “proper” presentation of the news and the tone of the editorials. So, we can be sure that whatever we read in publications like Magyar Idők, Pesti Srácok, or 888.hu reflects the opinion of the Orbán government.

diplomacy

The first attack on Colleen Bell came from Magyar Idők, which learned “from American sources” that Victoria Nuland, assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian Affairs at the U.S. State Department, is dissatisfied with Ambassador Bell because she is not tough enough on the Orbán government. That’s why she is being called back to Washington for consultation. Well, no she isn’t being called back. She is going on a private visit, and naturally while in the United States she will pay a visit to the State Department.

This article, written by László Szőcs, formerly of Népszabadság, was outright polite in comparison to another piece that seems to reflect the opinion of the editorial staff. This second article is full of surprises because here Victoria Nuland is portrayed as the accomplice of George Soros. What is the connection? Believe it or not, it is Ukraine. The leading lights of Magyar Idők, who come from the hard-core Orbán worshippers at the old Magyar Nemzet, are fiercely pro-Russian and thus anti-Ukrainian. In this article both Nuland and Soros are accused of supporting the “bloody revolution of Maidan” in order “to build true democracy in Ukraine.” Soros, according to Magyar Idők, wants a similar fate for Europe. He wants to “bring the Arab Spring to our continent and change the current political systems of individual countries.” And he’s trying to achieve his devilish plan with the help of Viktoria Nuland.

Ottó Gajdics, one of the editors of Magyar Idők, was chosen to deliver an ugly personal attack on the U.S. ambassador, accusing her of having a low IQ. He also points to the Orbán-phobia of Victoria Nuland. In fact, Hungary is “one of the best allies of the United States in the region,” but these people find two serious problems with Hungary. One is that it is right-wing and nationalist, and as such is not ready to “serve the global ambitions of the superpower.” Their other problem with Hungary is that its government has too strong a legitimacy. Ever since 2010 the United States has done its best to foist upon Hungary a policy that would serve the interests of the United States. “But the country has resisted these most shameless attempts at interference by the giant who believes itself to be the policeman of the globe.”

Right after the Bell speech that made such waves in Hungary, Professor Charles Gati gave an interview to Gábor Horváth of Népszabadság. In it, Gati expressed his bafflement over the Orbán government’s foreign policy. As he put it, “There are two countries which are important from the Hungarian perspective. One is the United States, which guarantees the country’s security through NATO. The other is Germany, which is of key economic importance. Both countries are quite popular among Hungarians and yet the government lately has been attacking both. I simply don’t understand Hungarian foreign policy when the government rants against Chancellor Merkel and the United States. This is not in Hungary’s national interest.”

A few days ago three foreign policy experts got together at Corvinus University to discuss Hungarian foreign policy: Géza Jeszenszky, foreign minister (1990-1994) and ambassador to Washington (1998-2002); Péter Balázs, foreign minister (2009-2010); and Tamás Magyarics, ambassador to Ireland (2010-2014). They all agreed that having bad relations with the United States and the European Union is not smart. Perhaps the best description of Viktor Orbán’s foreign policy came from Péter Balázs, who likened the Hungarian government to a teenager going through puberty: insecure and oversensitive, confused. “Like a troubled teenager who turns against his family, makes friends with the wrong kind of people, neglects his studies, loses touch with his cousins who live beyond the borders, and is friendly with those who actually treat him badly.”

Unfortunately, I don’t see any inclination on the part of the Orbán government to change its course. If anything, the opposite is true. The attacks multiply and the volume is being turned up every day. Instead of finding common ground, Orbán hopes to change the atmosphere in Washington by courting Republican lawmakers with the assistance of Connie Mack, a former congressman and now lobbyist. Millions of dollars are being spent on Mack’s meager achievements. After all, the administration is still in Democratic hands, and criticism of the State Department by a few Republican congressmen will not make the slightest difference. But more about this tomorrow.

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Charles Gati
Guest

Your excellent analysis of the new anti-American campaign includes a link to a “second article” — unsigned — from Magyar Idők. An old polemical phrase caught my attention there. In Hungarian that phrase is “Nem véletlen…”, meaning: “It’s not by accident.”

This is one of two frequently used phrases I recall now from the repertoire of Soviet-style, Communist polemics. (The other one was “As is well-known..”) Both of these phrases, which invariably hinted at some vast conspiracy against Communism or the Soviet camp, were normally followed by the Big Lie.

May I say that it’s not by accident that this new daily reverts to the use of Soviet-style, conspiratorial phrasing. For, as is well known, there are revealing similarities between extremists of all types.

Observer
Guest

Right on.

Everybody knows (mindenki tudja), to which I usually answer: No, I don’t. Never heard such nonsense.
It is more than clear (a napnál világos) to which I say: It is a pretty dark and obscure your sun.

But these are basic communication techniques and if it wasn’t for the blatant lies therein, they would have been quite acceptable. I often recommend learning such to the democratic media and politicians.

dos929
Guest

The foreign policy (if such a thing exists at all for this regime…) of Orban and his government simply doesn’t exist. Just like their governance at home, is nothing else but ‘ad hoc’ decisions made by half-educated pompous gangsters who know that no one can do anything about it. They inherited a country that in theory at least had a bright future under the aegis of the EU, but all they were capable of was to rob the country and its citizens from material and intellectual freedom. They are no different from pirates of the past who took from the defenceless whatever they could put their hands on… The problem however is that this is not the 17th century of the high seas and the country they are robbing blind is part of the EU, the very same organisation that let this regime to flourish in spite of the endless warnings and daily breachings of democratic norms. So, little wonder that this trend is present in their foreign policy and ‘diplomatic manners’ as well…

Guest

I had to chuckle when I read this:
“meddling in another country’s internal affairs”
Wasn’t that the usual answer/complaint from the government when anyone criticised a Communist state?
Back to the roots!

Miklos
Guest

For centuries the Papal Encyclical was read and published in Hungary, with instructions what to do or not and how to behave. During the 40 years of Soviet occupation it was replaced by instruction from Moscow. The newest ones are coming from Washington and probably written by Victoria Nuland. The latest was delivered by the distinguished soap opera specialist, Collen Bell, a well trained and seasoned diplomat. Hungarians now only have to follow the instructions of the masters of democracy builders like in Iraq, Afganistan or Lybia.

webber
Guest

Then why is the government of Hungary following instructions from Moscow?

Guest

Really?
I’ve read from the Fidesz and other right wing lunatics that “Brussels is the new Moscow” – so please make up your mind!

webber
Guest

“The ministry proposal originally included the media in a long list of institutions and companies — including energy, postal and weapons firms — that would employ secret agents who are qualified for “cover” jobs if required by the government.”

That is, they removed media firms from the proposal, but the postal services and energy firms are to have secret agents.

“Government spokesman Zoltan Kovacs later said that while it was “unavoidable for reasons of national security” that secret agents work, for example, at mobile phone service providers…”

This will legalize monitoring of phone calls, internet, and post without prior court approval.

Before I get another “who cares, they’re doing already anyway”, I will stress that legalization makes all the difference in the world.

Saying “they’re doing it anyway” and implying that therefore legalization is okay is ridiculous.

For instance, the police sometimes beat people in detention. We all know this – it is indisputable. So, should we make beating prisoners legal?

http://news.yahoo.com/media-advocate-pleased-hungary-scrapped-newsroom-spies-plan-131751986–finance.html

Cinicin
Guest

The Hungarian intelligence services already have a broad right to spy and such right includes the media and it is certain that many media outlets do employ people who have other ‘professional’ obligations too.

This law would have made the life of Orban’s domestic intelligence/state security people easier and the power situation more explicit but make no mistake they are already everywhere where they want to control the action. Media has always been a prime focus for Orban. Media is power and Orban has to control it. Period.

Orban’s security people are everywhere also because he rarely trusts people who are not in one of the services or used to be (but as we know from Putin himself there is no such thing as a former KGB agent). The services select solely for loyalty which ‘accidentally’ is also Orban’s main selection criteria.

webber
Guest
Cincin, I’ll say it again, this time more explicitly: Your argument is specious. Indeed, it’s idiotic. . That people from the intelligence services MAY already be “everywhere” (your term: how do you know that?) does not mean that this proposal is okay, or that a law allowing the intelligence services to put their people here or there will change nothing. 1st: If the new law would change nothing, why introduce it at all? Why not just leave things as they are? Why is the government even bothering with this? The answer is clear: The new law will, if passed, change things in a very significant way. Indeed, the Hungarian system will slip back into the legality of Kadar’s Hungary in this respect. 2nd, I will again give you the parallel: People in police custody are sometimes beaten everywhere in the world. Going by your logic, it would be okay if the government were to make it legal for the police to beat people in their custody because, after all, people are sometimes beaten anyway, even though the law now bans this. So (by your illogic) why not just make it legal for the police to beat people whenever they like?… Read more »
webber
Guest

Cincin jelentést tesz a sötét Patkányföldről?
http://meselandia.hu/cincin-lovag-teljes-mese/

Guest

Please, Webber, Cincin is on the side of freedom – read his comment again, he surely is no Orbanista!

Cinicin
Guest

You misunderstood me.

My point is that the world is now surprised that Orban would send the internal security onto the media, yet another step towards dictatorship.

Well, guess what, they are already there and they are reporting to their superiors.

Granted, the proposed system would be worse, but now that the bill is killed (at least in this respect) people will think, oh, there’s still democracy, Orban backed off. No such luck.

The existing laws, though more general in wording, already make it possible for internal security to place people whereever they want – they cannot legally force the edior-in-chief to hire the person, but that is it. Do you seriously think that anybody in the media would refuse the polite asking of the Ministry of Interior of his/her boss? But all this is academic, Orban has an internal security system built out which survailles the media, form within.

webber
Guest

I apologize to cincin.

I think the proposal for this new law is awful, regardless of them removing the bit about the media. They are going to legalize planting secret police in broad sectors of industry. Internal spying is to be legalized again, and we are steadily moving back to Kadar’s times

boribon
Guest

I think the placement of the “asset” these days takes place without the knowledge of the editors in chief or the editorial directors or whatever the top position is. Over 50 people, there exists usually an HR department which has jurisdiction to hire people in some positions without the approval of the top management and for state security what’s important is that the asset should be in a position where he/she is exposed to the info flow, not that he/she is hired in a managerial or important position. It could be an IT job and HR job or some administrative, secretarial job, not necessarily an editorial, decision making job. What’s certain is that Orban’s people are all over the media. It’s also all legal. Not necessarily that the info is then shared with Fidesz party people but that’s just the nature of the things.

webber
Guest

Why try to pass such a law, if “it’s all legal”.

There is a vital difference between volunteers sending information to party headquarters (I know such a person), and professionals from the secret services.

If they are following the pattern of the communist days, then they are just recruiting people who have already been hired, not trying to put new people in the workplace. They might even get the party-faithful to do the work for free.

I know for certain of one such person making reports – because he mentioned it, rather proudly, to his colleagues (who were grateful to know – it’s always nice to know!). He apparently feels important. That, too, is nice.

novo
Guest

Back in the old days most employees knew, well, suspected the identity of the béemes (ie the person from the Ministry of Interior reporting on his colleagues) in their midst. Not all of them of course, but most such people were suspected by colleagues.

However the system of surveillance is such that it didn’t really matter that people knew/suspected the identities since they (the employees) behaved as expected by the system and thereby the system reached its goal: there was indeed no political dissent. And ultimately that’s what matters, not the exact method of surveillance.

Member

It is not only legitimized spying each other, but this will open the door for insider trading!

Zorgas
Guest
There is nothing that should have been unanticipated in the infantile and apoplectic Fidesz response to Colleen Bell’s speech. It is similar to it’s response to Andre Goodfriend’s public comments. In fact, I can imagine that when Colleen Bell previewed what she was going to say to Jenő Megyesy, he told her that it was a bad idea and that the government would take it badly. Viktor Orban simply can’t handle any public discussion of his policies, unless it is abject praise. As evidenced by Viktor Orban’s “ignore what I say” comment in 2006, Fidesz tries to manage two separate spheres, that of illusory propaganda and that of concrete action. Fidesz tries to control the message while it quietly does whatever it wants. And while the US position has maintained a consistent position on rights and governance matters for years, it was when Andre Goodfriend began to take control of the public messaging away from Fidesz that the Orban coterie began to have tantrums in public. They argued that diplomacy should be conducted in private, not via the media. However, when the Fidesz government didn’t like the points the US was making in private, they leaked them (e.g. the banned… Read more »
Guest

Thank you Zorgas, for you outspoken words!

Sometimes I’m amazed when people appear here “out of the blue” and I find that they are thinking along the same lines as the regular commenters here ..
We may be a minority, but a very distinctive group!

Zorgas
Guest

It is indeed a distinctive group, able to offer insights and have a constructive discussion, albeit decidedly partisan, without as much trolling as elsewhere (thanks to self-monitoring and Eva’s oversight). While this group may be a minority, it is exemplary. And examples are, by their nature, a minority — which is why they are so necessary.

dos929
Guest

“As evidenced by Viktor Orban’s “ignore what I say” comment in 2006, Fidesz tries to manage two separate spheres, that of illusory propaganda and that of concrete action.”

The facts are that both, what Orban says, as well as what he does, is troubling to say the least… Such a statement alone would force the resignation of a PM in any normal democracy.

Istvan
Guest
This discussion of Ambassador Colleen Bell’s lack of intelligence by Ottó Gajdics is profoundly repugnant and as an American Hungarian I find it disgusting. Like many political appointees to the post of being an Ambassador Ms. Bell has limited qualifications for her post and her profession as having been a producer of soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful,” invite jokes even by me. Moreover, the fact that she effectively inherited the soap opera franchise from her family and could reasonably be considered to be an American liberal heiress adds to the false picture of being a bimbo. Even Senator McCain never questioned Bell’s intelligence during her contentious confirmation process, but he did raise serious questions about whether or not she was qualified. There is by the way a hypocritical component to Senator McCain because he supported Ambassadorships for wealthy Republican donators with equally dubious qualifications to his party during the Bush administration without objection (see http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29142-2004May15.html ). As Eva has repeatedly pointed out its the State Department professionals who dictate policy in the US Embassy in Budapest, not the political appointees to the post of Ambassador. One thing I do like about Bell’s background is her past work for… Read more »
Istvan
Guest
This discussion of Ambassador Colleen Bell’s lack of intelligence by Ottó Gajdics is profoundly repugnant and as an American Hungarian I find it disgusting. Like many political appointees to the post of being an Ambassador Ms. Bell has limited qualifications for her post and her profession as having been a producer of soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful,” invite jokes even by me. Moreover, the fact that she effectively inherited the soap opera franchise from her family and could reasonably be considered to be an American liberal heiress adds to the false picture of being a bimbo. Even Senator McCain never questioned Bell’s intelligence during her contentious confirmation process, but he did raise serious questions about whether or not she was qualified. There is by the way a hypocritical component to Senator McCain because he supported Ambassadorships for wealthy Republican donators with equally dubious qualifications to his party during the Bush administration without objection (see http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29142-2004May15.html ). As Eva has repeatedly pointed out its the State Department professionals who dictate policy in the US Embassy in Budapest, not the political appointees to the post of Ambassador. One thing I do like about Bell’s background is her past work for… Read more »
Istvan
Guest
The discussion of Ambassador Colleen Bell’s lack of intelligence by Ottó Gajdics is profoundly repugnant and as an American Hungarian I find it disgusting. Like many political appointees to the post of being an Ambassador Ms. Bell has limited qualifications for her post and her profession as having been a producer of soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful,” invite jokes even by me. Moreover, the fact that she effectively inherited the soap opera franchise from her family and could reasonably be considered to be an American liberal heiress adds to the false picture of being a bimbo. Even Senator McCain never questioned Bell’s intelligence during her contentious confirmation process, but he did raise serious questions about whether or not she was qualified. There is by the way a hypocritical component to Senator McCain because he supported Ambassadorships for wealthy Republican donators with equally dubious qualifications to his party during the Bush administration without objection (see http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29142-2004May15.html ). As Eva has repeatedly pointed out its the State Department professionals who dictate policy in the US Embassy in Budapest, not the political appointees to the post of Ambassador. One thing I do like about Bell’s background her past work for he… Read more »
petofi
Guest

@Zorgas

I enjoyed your submission, especially,
a) ‘the Fidesz chihuahuas have been unleashed’…and,
b) ‘Orban likes that even worse’

Wonderful images to be added to the Spectrum universe.

Guest

Hehe I like the ‘chihuahuas’ bit too….;-)….

As much as I do not like the usual diatribes directed at the United States with a dash of ‘ugly personal remarks’ by the Hungarian administration I can see though that will be rough and tumble for quite some time. But I think the US is dressed for protection. We can take it.

Kind of in their own ‘animal farm’ Magyarorszag and the US. The Kutyakok and the Sasok. One’s got a niggedly bite. The other well has to fly gloriously above and wait for its chance to s…w…..o…..o…..p. Foreign policy I think is like that! Countries have to look for ‘advantages’ in relations. Arguably Magyarorszag is a bit tense.

qaz
Guest

Makes no mistake: Chihuahuas may look ridiculous but they are very loyal and can be very brave. They would not hesitate taking on much larger dogs or animals in defense of their owner… to sometime fatal consequence.

Fekete Edgár János
Guest
Orban will not change, that’s out of the question. He is very predictable actually, if he is criticized he will redouble his efforts to do it anyway. Just yesterday in his hometown of Felcsút he told the gathered people that if others criticize the tourist railway being built at Felcsút he will double its length, if they continue to attack the project, then he will triple its length (ie. of the completely useless local railways costing billions). Orban only reacts to raw power. Nothing else. Orban thinks diplomacy is for the weak and the really powerful, if they are really powerful display their power and act accordingly. If the US wants something – so thinks Orban – it should toughen up and do it like tough people do it, if, however the US isn’t committed than it should stop doing this diplomacy bullshit. It’s a nuisance and it will lead nowhere. I think Orban is also surprised why the US still doesn’t get it, he will not change and move a bit however many “non-papers” Nuland will present. It is exactly what it is: a non-paper, a non-thing, nothing. Who cares about it really? What’s Orban’s downside? That said, Orban… Read more »
Zorgas
Guest
While it may be true that Viktor Orban finds Vladimir Putin’s brute caveman approach more seductive, and only does what he needs to do when forced to, it doesn’t serve the US or the EU well to use Russian or Soviet tactics to compel Viktor Orban — especially if the goal is to have Hungary be a democratic country with a strong civil society. Were the US to adopt Vladimir Putin’s approach, it would only serve to legitimate the use of brute force, and support the authoritarian illiberalism Viktor Orban espouses. If Viktor Orban and finds that it’s a lot more liberating to be able to urinate and defecate wherever he wants, and eat chunks of raw meat from the floor, impressive as that may be, it’s those who live in the same house with him that should care the most. And, at some point, the neighbors will get fed up too. Hungarians are the most affected by the path Viktor Orban and Fidesz has taken. The US is right to still treat Hungary as a democracy and speak out publicly about what it means to be a democracy. Hungarians can choose between the authoritarian fist they have known from… Read more »
exTor
Guest

If diplomacy occurs behind closed doors, then why would the US do open diplomacy, which is what the Colleen Bell speech was? Is it payback for the presumed Hungarian leak of the nonpaper? Is this an attempt by the US to temper what it sees as increasing Hungarian political intransigence, both within Europe [refugees] and outside of Europe [Russia, Ukraine]?

In some way, I see the US playing the long game. It may be trying to undermine Orbán bit-by-bit as the next election approaches. 2018 is only 2 years and change away.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Zorgas
Guest
I think the US government has been very clear about practicing both public and private diplomacy. It has been the Hungarian government which has called “foul” at America’s public diplomacy — which at the same time apparently leaking these private diplomatic communications to the media to, in essence, publicly flog itself with the US government’s privately communicated concerns, and then claim that now that these concerns have been made public, it will not bow to American pressure. I would argue that Ambassador Bell’s speech was not payback for the leak of the nonpaper. Instead, the leak of the nonpaper was more likely an attempt to forestall or undercut the inevitable negative assessment that the Hungarian government knew was coming. In leaking the 29-point nonpaper, the Fidesz government rehashed its fallacious argument (see the Moscow document previously cited by Kim Lane Scheppele) that discussing issues relating to human rights, fundamental freedoms, democracy and the rule of law equates to interference in domestic issues, it looks like the Hungarian government was trying to fire a warning shot over the US government’s bow, cautioning it to think twice before raising these issues again. But, Fidesz generally loads its muskets with buckshot — great… Read more »
spectator
Guest

One of the gravest errors civilised entities – people, countries – used to make, treat Orbán as gentleman, and expect that he – hereby Hungary, his own private fiefdom – will react as gentlemen usually do.

Wrong!

It was the fall of the so called left-liberal opposition in Hungary, it will be the reason of the failure of all the EU and other (US, NATO, whatever) intentions as well.

We are talking about a streetwise tough with enough psychopathic tendencies to his whole village, with unsurpassed power in the region.
Yes, people, down and personal, because the whole problem is turning around and about Orbán as person and his twisted personality, whatever else we trying to point to.

The rest of his cronies consist mostly the usual opportunist crowd, with more or less similar background and similarly unsatisfiable greed for more, more power, money influences, you name it.

Unfortunately the boundaries of civilisation – which just as nonexistent to him as humanism, empathy, honor and fairness, just to name a few – leave the rest, the “normal” entities without even the chance of the the slightest influence…

And no, I have no “civilised” solution, before you asked…

Observer
Guest

Spot on.
Orban spelled it out: “the only things Hungarians understand is force”.
Growing up small in stature, beaten by a violent father, and presumably peers, he has a huge complex. This is why he kicks all whom he can, often gratuituously, but has learned to retreat when facing superior power.
Level playing field is not his turf, he knows no gentlemen’s rules. Aftern all, where from ?

Guest

Re: ‘Level playing field is not his turf, he knows no gentlemen’s rules. Aftern all, where from ?’

And that is perhaps why the current Magyar administration needs to be continually under the US microscope when it comes to the future of democracy there in the country and in the European theater.

The United States needs to be firmly ‘on the watch’ there by the Danube. They need to be in Viktor’s face 24/7. Viktor certainly will take umbrage but somebody’s got to look out for how his country ‘swings’. We must remember Vlad is too. Why should Vlad have all the fun in the palace on the Donau? He must be giving a lot of ‘5 finger’ discounts. Things we’d like to see: Viktor p****d at Vlad and his Duma. But there is so much love, eh? Love conquers all. Sugar and spice and everythin’ nice.

Member
The main thing Orban is an opportunist, he wants to keep all options open. He tells the west one thing and the east something different. I do think he has an exit plan if and when the EU collapses, but he is careful to ensure that Hungary will be picked up by Russia if the money stops flowing from the EU. Which is why the blatant and increased funneling of EU funds, to have in reserve if need be. He seems to be setting it up so he can cry “interference”, by Soros, the EU, USA etc. He also has loan money from PAKS that could be robbed from as well. I honestly don’t thing Orban cares what happens as long as the next election is his. He will live life comfortable in exile if need be if the worst was to happen. He just will make sure there are other people to blame and that he himself and his buddies cannot be prosecuted. As long as he can keep the charade going for long enough for him to get set up, the rest doesn’t matter. I truly feel this way. I don’t think Orban gives a hoot about the… Read more »
spectator
Guest

Liz, I agree fully!
This is the truth, the whole truth – from Orbán’s side. In my opinion even the politics is only the means to get all he wants, and some more, much more!
And he’ll getting his booty at any price, there is nothing and nobody to stop him.

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