Will the Schengen system survive?

Although the international media has only recently focused on the possible collapse of the so-called Schengen system, which basically eliminated internal borders for the 24 countries that comprise the Schengen zone, trouble has been brewing since early September. Several countries reintroduced, even if temporarily, border controls. And several European politicians, among them the Finnish president and the Slovak foreign minister, expressed their belief that the Schengen system could fall apart as a result of the pressures posed by the migrant crisis. More importantly, both Angela Merkel and the French foreign minister indicated that if there is no common solution to the refugee crisis, the Schengen agreement might have to be scrapped in its present form.

In mid-September politico.hu published an article titled “The Dirty Dozen: 12 People Who Ruined Schengen,” in which Michael Binyon wrote: “It is not Chancellor Angela Merkel who has ruined Schengen — she still insists the measures are temporary. It is nationalists, dictators, criminals, and human traffickers outside Europe who are undermining this rare milestone of integration. Several prominent politicians also have to shoulder the blame, either through ignorance, insouciance, or malign intent.” Among the twelve, right after Bashar al-Assad, was Viktor Orbán.

Of course, the Hungarian government sees the situation differently. Viktor Orbán and his foreign minister claim that in fact it has been Hungary that has been valiantly defending the Schengen borders by following the Dublin agreement to the letter. Of course, this is not an accurate description of Hungary’s actions. Viktor Orbán refuses to support a common EU policy regarding the refugee crisis. At the same time, it is definitely in the interest of Hungary to preserve the Schengen zone, for both psychological and economic reasons.

Yet we hear demands from Western Europe for basic structural changes in the whole Schengen setup. What should we know about Schengen? First of all, it was 30 years ago, in 1985, that five countries–Germany, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg–signed an agreement that established a border-free zone with a view to eventually achieving a borderless European Union. The current crisis and the terrorist attack on Paris threaten this Schengen system. Yesterday the European Commission announced that the Netherlands officially suggested having a discussion about setting up a kind of “mini-Schengen zone” comprising France, Germany, Austria, and the Benelux countries. So, basically, the members that joined the EU in 2004 would be left out of this new mini-Schengen.

Viktor Orbán and Péter Szijjártó immediately expressed their dismay at the very idea. According to Szijjártó, it is offensive that “those countries want to create an inner circle for themselves” who have been criticizing Hungary all along when it is only Hungary that follows the rules of the Schengen agreement. The dissolution of the Schengen zone would cause huge economic damage to Central Europe and Hungary. And they talk about “European solidarity,” he added.

shengen zone

Viktor Orbán at a press conference after his meeting with Nikola Gruevski, Macedonia’s prime minister, also talked about the danger the Schengen zone is facing. He somewhat optimistically announced that “Dublin is dead, but Schengen is alive.” If the Schengen system collapses, “walls can be raised inside the territory of the Union,” which would be a calamity. Strange words coming from someone who built a fence between Slovenia and Hungary, two Schengen nations. Earlier in his usual Friday morning interview on Magyar Rádió Orbán was surprisingly reasonable when the reporter expressed her fear of the Schengen system’s immediate collapse and the “European leaders’ twaddle.” He expressed his trust that the problem will surely be solved. My hunch is that Orbán fears the collapse of the Schengen zone and will therefore display a more cooperative attitude. Mind you, as usual, he now wants to create “a new European Union,” which will never materialize.

Meanwhile, at France’s request, an emergency meeting of EU interior and justice ministers was convened. The French government presented a three-page list of demands, which The Guardian got hold of two days ago. The main points of the French proposals were endorsed by the ministers today. These are sensible precautionary measures which, to my surprise, were not on the books until now. The French called for stricter controls at the borders of the Schengen zone that will involve checking even EU citizens coming from outside of the zone. After all, the people who were responsible for the Paris terrorist attacks were EU citizens who could easily return from the Middle East without being checked against a “possible terrorist” list. The ministers endorsed the introduction of a “passenger name record” (PNR) of all people flying inside or outside of the European Union, which will be kept for a year. The French also demanded greater intelligence sharing across the EU. There should be a joint database of suspects with possible terrorist connections. At this point we know little of the details, but I assume in the next few days we will find out more about the introduction of new measures long overdue in Europe.

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D7 Democrat (@D7Democrat)
Guest

“My hunch is that Orbán fears the collapse of the Schengen zone and will therefore display a more cooperative attitude.”

Of course the Fidesz gangsters fear the collapse of Schengen. Schengen collapses and more Hungarians with brains stay in Hungary and Hungarians with brains is what the Fidesz Fuhrer and his lapdogs fear the most.

WesleyVsky
Guest

I would disagree D7. I believe Orban has more fear of western money not flowing into Hungary. The West End in Budapest is a great place to shop, but it is almost all companies based outside Hungary. If I owned C&H, or Media Markt and I found Orban was hurting my business I would move out. Didn’t Orban recently have some issues with RTL? Hungarians love their country, but free travel to and fro is important to them. They don’t want to return to a pre 1989 era. As for myself I want to keep visiting Hungary, but I don’t want to experience a police state at the border, or moving about internally. Then I will just stop going there.

Istvan
Guest

Viktor Orbán comments at the press conference after his meeting with Nikola Gruevski, Macedonia’s prime minister arguing that If the Schengen system collapses it would be a calamity for Hungary were indeed puzzling. Did the business community get to him and explain the increased costs for shipping parts and finished products to western Europe if Schengen completely collapsed?

The Dutch truckers’ association has estimated that adding just an hour’s wait at each border for the checking of papers would cost its members an extra $684 million a year. Trade would suffer too. In a paper published last year, Dane Davis of CRU Group and Thomas Gift of Duke University calculated that where two countries are members of Schengen, their total trade increases by 0.1% a year — in the case of Italy and Spain that amounts to $50 million annually. I suspect this is the root of Orban’s conversion to supporting he Schengen system. Possibly that is why in his radio interview this morning he put all the burden for refugees on Greece since it is an external border on the EU.

WesleyVsky
Guest

Orban depends on western money, but being a constant nag will eventually grow old. He has poked a stick in Germany’s eye more than once. He is not winning any friends in that land except among Pegida. Orban’s snuggle up with Putin makes him suspect to anyone with an inch of intellect.

exTor
Guest

As callous as this may sound, it will take a lot more than last week’s –7 days and 3 hours ago– terror to shut down the borders. It will cost a lot of money to reinstall the former border structures. After that, there will be the costs brought about by the new borders themselves.

The push for more security, which cannot be addressed by rebordering Europe, is big in France and Belgium, however once the gruesomeness of Friday the 13th abates, cooler and perhaps smarter heads will realize a quick ‘fix’ aint no fix.

MAGYARKOZÓ

PALIKA
Guest

Please can we be less parochial? The world is not Orban Centric.

Schengen is a well meant but misconceived idea. Just like the common currency. They are the building bricks of the United Nations of Europe. A grotesque misconception.

The latter may survive because it’s collapse could trigger unforeseen consequences.

The former seems to have become a serious obstacle to our safety and security in Europe. Nothing whatever to do with Orban though he performed an exercise which resulted in highlighting the security concerns. He did not do it well.

Orban is a side show because what is needed now is the difficult exercise of trying to look after those who made their escape from Syria etc and two other matters. The first is thenability of host countries to accommodate them. Not easy.

The next is our security. Is a putative refugee a refugee or someone who prefers to live in Frankfurt? He may be a terrorist but this must be exposed.

Even if apparently not so at this time how long is he likely to become a terrorist if dissaitisfied and disappointed? Not easy but tread with caution.

Guest

In a classroom, just one badly behaved child ruins the dynamics within the entire class.

I find it incredible that Orbán, the badly behaved child of the EU, has managed to damage not just Hungary but the EU as well, where he is now busy sowing seeds of discontent, conflict and ultimately destruction.

The idea of an inner Schengen zone is perfectly acceptable and reasonable. If a nation such as Hungary is incapable of either understanding or behaving like a proper democracy, why should it reap the benefits of those countries which are more enlightened or evolved?

What does Hungary contribute to the EU under Orbán, other than rancour and disharmony?

tappanch
Guest

20/11/2015

23:57
“le troisième kamikaze du Stade de France est aussi passé par la Grèce”

19:30
“Deux des kamikazes du Stade de France passés par la Grèce”

http://www.lefigaro.fr/actualites/2015/11/20/01001-20151120LIVWWW00015-l-etat-islamique-menace-la-france-et-les-etats-unis.php

Minusio
Guest

Both Schengen and the euro are very good things. However they are projects in progress, unfinished.

Dublin was a serious logical mistake.

If we want to reduce the – now very well regulated – flow of refugees from Syria we have to take some real money into our hands and go to Jordania, Lebanon and, yes unspeakable Erdogan’s Turkey, to make the refugees stay there.

The EU has more than 500 million inhabitants. It can easily absorb a couple of thousand refugees a day. From a demographic point of view anyway.

And I am proud that Germany managed to meet this challenge in stride, first the civil society, then – finally – the administrative agencies also. (While the US is still haggling about letting 10’000 Syrians in – because they may be terrorists. What a gaga country.)

Guest

I remember well the border controls in Europe forty years ago – it would be horrible for travellers to return to that!
But probably many Germans would be ok with a bit of punishment for those right wing illiberal Eastern Europeans – and it would also help people stay in the West and spend their money there …

The industry in Eastern Europe anyway is just a small fraction of what is outsourced to Asia – so this would be just a nuisance, but of course it would be bad for Hungary etc:
Even more workplaces would be transferred to Asia – does Orbán really want for Hungary to lose all those jobs?

A bit OT re the refugees and the USA:
Who wrote:

“The Syrian refugees are as much victims of ISIS as the dead in France.
Donald Trump and thirty-one governors have it wrong, wrong, wrong.
Let them in. Santa Fe, at least, will welcome them.”

Illustrated with wonderful pictures of Miss Liberty …
Of course George R R Martin – his “Not a blog” is an interesting read, not only for science fiction fans like me …
http://grrm.livejournal.com/

Guest
wolfi “…..does Orbán really want for Hungary to lose all those jobs?” Orbán does not care about who loses their jobs, if they are not direct supporters of his. He is a politician without policies and simply makes it up and moves any goalposts as he goes along. Thence the endless muddles and “explanations” of the conflicting and contradictory Fidesz statements to a bewildered (and by now exasperated) EU, whom the Hungarian government-controlled media then accuses of “misunderstanding” the poor Hungarians. Orbán, the policy-less politician, does not care about leftwing or rightwing. He does not care what religion or race anyone is, even while mouthing crowd-pleasing racist remarks if it means more votes. He has only one goal in mind and that is to fuel his ruthless march towards ever more control over every aspect of life in Hungary. So he might produce crocodile tears about helping people hold on to jobs, or even about creating new jobs, but only if he thinks that is what the EU wants to hear, since his only interest in the EU is the massive funds which it allocates to Hungary, and which in fact only goes as far as Orbán and Co. Ultimately,… Read more »
Observer
Guest

Spot on! Absolutely.

Guest

Totally OT but interesting and historically important:

“A vast and historically valuable trove of Holocaust-era documents, long thought destroyed during the second world war, has been found hidden in a wall cavity by a couple renovating their Budapest apartment.

The haul of 6,300 documents are from a 1944 census that was a precursor to the intended liquidation of the Hungarian capital’s 200,000 Jews in Nazi death camps.

Brigitte Berdefy, co-owner of the apartment overlooking Hungary’s parliament, said in August a worker detected paper after jamming a screwdriver through a crack in the wall.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/21/holocaust-documents-trove-unearthed-in-budapest-apartment?

petofi
Guest

re Holocaust-era documents

Ridiculous to give it to the city…incriminating documents will now disappear in Orbanistan. Why couldn’t they just ask some official from the US or Israeli embassy to come and take it away?

(The knee-jerk reaction of an affrighted Hungarian citizen.)

Member

Fantastic!
Here is a more detailed description on how they will preserve, and “catalogue” the documents. Although it is written in Hungarian, there are a very few great photos also included. Also, all the dat will be released as early as in 2016! They assume that there would be more such documents hidden. The building where they found the documents served as a government building at the time.
http://vs.hu/magazin/osszes/ki-tudja-hany-zsidolista-lapul-meg-a-kossuth-teren-1107
The only thing that confuses me is that although they say that the documents contain data from the districts of 11-14, the sample page they put on as illustration contains the data from four other districts.

webber
Guest
Even without Schengen, there is duty-free movement of goods within the EU, and that would not change if Schengen were to end. Without Schengen, the EU would more closely resemble the NAFTA zone (free movement of goods, but not people). With Schengen, much of the EU more closely resembles the US. I do not believe that ending Schengen would have stopped the attack in France. The attackers would simply have presented i.d. at the Belgian-French border, and the authorities would then know precisely when they entered France. So what? Because of passport checks, authorities were able to figure out the movements of the Syrian passport-holder from Greece up through the Balkans, all the way to Austria (Hungary did not register him). Did passport checks stop the attacker? Would passport checks have stopped attackers who were French or Belgian citizens? Of course not. The problem is elsewhere. The attacks revealed a huge security shortcoming within France. I hope and trust France’s security agencies are getting a rather large boost to their budgets to deal with Islamic extremists, and hope they will be hiring a LOT of new agents. The attacks also revealed an enormous shortcoming in European security in general (little… Read more »
Istvan
Guest

Webber your thoughts on this issue are well reasoned. The temporary solution ultimately to organized IS attacks has to be to cut off the head of the snake, the increased security measures in Europe and France can reduce the odds of an attack. The reason I say temporary is IS in Syria can be put out of business as the coordinating center for terrorism, but the core ideology of jihadism will continue.

We are in this struggle for the rest of our lives I am afraid. My pessimism comes after having read William McCants very detailed book “The ISIS Apocalypse,” which gives the theological basis for the incomprehensible practices of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq. As crazy as the group appears it does frighteningly have a coherent ideology. Which is not completely based in the Quran, but in heavily in what is called the Sayings (hadith).

Guest
@Istvan November 21, 2015 at 9:02 am István, Much of the discussion here, as elsewhere in the media, is about symptoms, rather than underlying causes. And attempting to remedy symptoms, rather than underlying causes, unfortunately and inevitably can never be more than a mere futile fool’s errand. In the United States of Amnesia, as elsewhere in the West, it is often forgot that it is Western meddling in the Middle East that spawned the various Islamic terrorisms over the past century. The Brits and the French imposed nonsensical borders and nonsensical nation states on the Arab Middle East, a melange of warring and mutually hostile ethnicities, religions and clans that the otherwise totally corrupt Ottomans governed successfully for centuries in terms of their unique millet system. The West imposed the Jews on the Arabs of Palestine, which resulted in a century of Palestinian Arab terrorism, the only form of armed resistance the Palestinian Arabs are capable of. The Yanks and the Brits deposed Mohammad Mosaddegh, a popularly elected moderate social democrat in Iran, which ultimately resulted in the Shia Islamic terror state of Iran we know today. The CIA (together with the Pakistani Intelligence Services it nurtured), was the the… Read more »
Istvan
Guest
Mike to a degree President Obama would agree with you. Which is why the President constantly discusses having the people of the middle east solve there own problems and opposes reintroduction of US ground forces in Iraq and Syria. I do not agree with our President on that issue. There is also another discussion going on in relation to IS within the strategic think tanks here and that is does the USA have a strategic interest in the Middle East now that we are producing more oil domestically than we can consume.? There is also a discussion about whether much of middle east will remain habitable in the future given global warming. I and others are looking for only an intermediate solution to IS, because we believe this group would use atomic weapons against western cities if they ever got access to them and they need to be rapidly destroyed. In a 2005 survey of 85 national security experts, 60 percent of the respondents assessed the odds of a nuclear attack within 10 years at between 10 and 50 percent, with an average of 29.2 percent. Nearly 80 percent of respondents expected the attack to originate with a terrorist group.… Read more »
Guest

Istvan, please!

The site you quoted is a well known (even to me …) satirical site!
Still I had to chuckle when I read this:
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin issued a direct plea to Barack Obama, urging him to order the Department of Homeland Security to “immediately seal off and close the nation’s borders,” and to shut down “the still active anti-American propaganda factory, silently operating right under our very noses, known as Borders Bookstores.” – See more at: http://nationalreport.net/sarah-palin-calls-obama-close-borders-bookstores/#sthash.XMC1mZQV.dpuf

Istvan
Guest
Wolfi the idea of developing a nuclear weapon using 3d printing is not a total joke although the article about the blast was, but it was based on the possible or maybe as some believe the probable. For example look at this article in the Washington Post http://wpo.st/998r0 or this one https://shar.es/1cprNk (which has also been attacked by credible chemists) or this one from Russia Today on weapons projects in the USA using 3d printing http://on.rt.com/pukqo0 (no doubt this is also being done in Russia also). The U.S. Army Armament Research and Development Center (ARRADCOM) is looking at all sorts of uses for advanced 3d printing and they are the center that brought us the warhead for the Patriot missile and numerous other advanced systems now in use. There is more than enough information out there explaining how to produce a nuclear weapon. This became obvious in 1967 after three newly minted physics professors with no nuclear weapons experience were able to draw up a credible design for a nuclear bomb. The physicists had been hired by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to assess the difficulty of producing a nuclear weapon, a project known as the Nth Country Experiment.… Read more »
Guest
@Istvan November 22, 2015 at 8:23 am I fully agree with you on the kind of threats now posed by IS and the urgent need to destroy it. I have two principal worries, however. The first is how best to quickly destroy IS. I don’t think that this is possible whilst adhering to contemporary Queensberry rules of warfare, i.e. conducting war in a manner that minimizes or even eliminates battlefield casualties and civilian collaterlal damage. The worry is that I doubt that the US and the broader Western coalition would have the stomach for what needs to be done. The second worry is about what comes afterwards. What we are up against is a religion-based ideology that has morphed into a world-wide murderous terror cult that threatens modern secular civilization itself. The question is what can and must be done to prevent it morphing again into something as bad or worse than IS, after IS got successfully smashed to smithereens in the military sense. And here I am thinking of the seemingly unbreakable nexus between Wahabi Saudi Arabia (with all the oil money sloshing about there) and the US and the rest of the West on the one hand, and… Read more »
Istvan
Guest

Here is a link to a photo of the US developed Special Atomic Demolition Munition (SADM) that could be carried on the back that was developed in the 1960s see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Atomic_Demolition_Munition Its really terrifying when you realize how small it was.

The Atomic Demolitions Munitions school was located at the US Army Engineer Center on Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, until it was closed in 1985. It was fired by a mechanical timer back in the 1960s and had a TNT equivalent of 10 tons. The Russians had similar devises. If this could be developed 50 years ago I am confident IS given the time and investment could develop a similar devise today.

Mike right now I agree none of us in the west have the intestinal fortitude for what needs to be done to IS to contain it including Mr Trump or especially a blow hard like Orban. Because it will cost a lot of lives on the part of western troops, kill many Sunni residents of IS held land who are not necessarily terrorists, and can’t be accomplished by an air war alone.

PALIKA
Guest
I agree with Weber but only up to a point. If all Schengen borders were or could be properly and thoroughly controlled free movement within the zone might carry fewer security risks. They could not be eliminated altogether. No system can do that. However the more controls there are the more difficult it becomes to penetrate. We all suffer serious restriction on our freedom in addition to hugely increased risk of becoming a terror victim as a result of the manifest failure of the post 9/11 “war on terror” to achieve its aims. In fact the measures taken have been counterproductive. Since it is very unlikely that the new war on terror will produce anything other than more terror attacks and civilian casualties can we really be very surprised if some countries want to look after their own people and not put their faith in alliances that have failed to do that? The U.S. Congress is in the process of doing what Orban is doing, banning migrants. Obama whose achievements are questioned by many in his own country and elsewhere will veto the Bill. Many of those in charge of the war on terror have their ears filled with the… Read more »
Istvan
Guest

At this point President Obama does not have the votes in the House to block a veto over ride, 50 Democrats voted for the bill.

PALIKA
Guest
Istvan, thank you for your comment. Unless I am much mistaken a veto override to be successful it requires a two thirds pro bill majority in each house. I have not checked the voting figures. My point is about the deep divide on the migrant issue. Obama has not faced up to floods of immigration from Mexico. Neither has he been successful in grappling with the instability in Iraq/Syria that has resulted in mess immigration into Europe as well as unprecedented level of European terrorism. The current bombing campaign which may or may not have any positive result is a product of a rethink. You may remember Obama and Cameron a few years ago wanted to bomb Asad’s positions, not ISIS’s. Cameron lost the vote in Parliament, Obama was restrained by the Russian foreign minister without whose intervention the terrorists would long since have taken over Damascus and who knows what else. If the Hungarians are not overwhelmed by the impact of US and West European policy incompetence and indolence it is no surprise Orban’s rhetoric, however unattractively put, finds a captive domestic audience. It may find wider resonance if the present belated challenge to ISIS proves ineffectual, or worse,… Read more »
webber
Guest

PALIKA
Obama has not faced the flood of migration from Mexico because there is no longer a flood of migration from Mexico.
More Mexicans are now leaving the US than are entering it (see the Reuters report linked below).

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/11/19/us-usa-immigration-mexico-idUSKCN0T82F220151119#WA2KiovikM6xzvTD.97

PALIKA
Guest

webber, thank you for the interesting information. It shows that immigration is an explosive issue regardless of the facts. You have not commented on the rest of my note which makes a number of other points I hope you agree with.

webber
Guest
Well… as to Orban’s captive audience, it is my impression that it doesn’t have a clue what is going on outside of Hungary, which is not surprising given the fact that its main source of guidance consists of a bunch of media pundits who are paranoiacs and liars (see Eva’s earlier post on some of them), and a news agency that is simply a liar. So, I don’t think it matters one whit to Hungarian public opinion what the EU or the US (separately) actually do or have or have not done. Most Hungarians don’t even know that the Hungarian government has lost a long series of cases in Brussels, and that Fidesz has had to change a bunch of laws because of that. They are convinced that Orban wins everything, and can’t be diverted from his goal (many of them post this here – people who don’t even support Orban repeat this sort of foolishness). Most of them also think the US is opposed to Hungary’s fence! They don’t bother to read what American officials and diplomats have written and said (not a word of criticism of the fence – “it’s Hungary’s sovereign right” is the repeated message). These… Read more »
webber
Guest
P.S. As to Obama “grappling with instability in Iraq and Syria” – from a small ordinary American’s point of view, why should he? At the end of the GW Bush years there was a huge swing toward isolationism. The US had intervened, and the result was a disaster. Public opinion in the Arab world about the US was lower than before. Americans were coming home in coffins wrapped in flags, and Americans were told these young men and women had died for Iraqi freedom, while it seemed many Iraqis didn’t want anything to do with that “freedom.” And the response, overwhelmingly, from the American public was “it’s not worth it. Let Iraqis die for Iraqi freedom.” Obama won elections on that sentiment – you can hate that sentiment, or like it, it doesn’t matter. It was overwhelming in those years. A LOT of Americans are still very wary of international intervention. Crush ISIS, fine. Change the Syrian government, because Assad is “bad” – maybe not, thanks. Tried that already. Didn’t work too well. Then there is one other small issue – this migration crisis… whose problem is it? Oh, Europe’s? How many people live in the EU? Oh, many more… Read more »
TeamBritanniaHu
Guest

I think there must be a strengthening of the external border, just as Hungary has done, but under EU supervision. There should also be a single internal French & German border (i.e. controls along the eastern borders of Germany and France) and along the Franco-Benelux border.

trackback

[…] and is ruled by out-of-touch liberals), need the Schengen Area to survive. The Hungarian Spectrum published a piece on this yesterday, quoting Hungary’s Foreign Minister, Péter Szijjártó, on the possibility […]

Member
Dear Eva@, when the Dutch proposal was first floated I thought that it ought to do with two issues. It was a final call for a serious joint action and a warning to those who try to undermine and disrupt that. After Paris, however Europe became under mounting pressure from yet another direction. In Washington, the House voted on Syrian refugees (doing more damage to the President than to her international relations). That was followed by a Senate proposal on tightening the visa waiver program /by Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)/. I did not see the text yet but I think that raises the stakes and gives to the Dutch proposal considerably more teeth. Schengen presupposes a lot of things but in its core lays the ability and willingness of the participants to cooperate. On multiple issues, including security. The new situation may force some politicians that have internal policies only to rethink their “foreign policy” being on collision course for quite some time with their best interests. Or not. OT but related: on Friday UNSC adopted resolutionon daesh, just short of mentioning Chapter 7. (It determined that the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant/Sham (ISIL/ISIS)… Read more »
spectator
Guest
The parallel with the unruly kid is quite adequate, just as well as the one rotten apple would do… Our little darling – the name Orbán – just keep stirring the crap, and now the effect clearly showing. Make no mistake, the (re)dividing of the EU only accelerated due to the Paris-attacks, it was in the works since quite awhile. By Orbán and his latest best friend, Putin. Never mind, if it would result once more borders between the different parts of pre Trianon Hungary, it doesn’t really matter to him. What matters is to tear away a measurable chunk of Europe (at least the Visegrad’s four+,) where he would be the “regent” of the “tzar”, and the almighty leader of all the “West Balkan” – an important part of the new Eurasian Empire – or whatever name the’ll prefer to take. I’m not in favour of conspiration theories usually, but to me all the indications point to that Orbán vill have a substantially more power and influence than he has today. He tried to gain that upper hand within the whole EU, but the German-French dominance still quite formidable, so, he must work indirectly, involving the former East-Bloc countries.… Read more »
spectator
Guest

Expanding the sphere of influence, ‘fishing trip’ for new voters, or both?

Looks like Orbán doesn’t trust that his mesmerising effect on the Transylvanian Hungarians last till the next term, so he’s working on a backup plan.

By the other hand, gaining more support for the above mentioned scheme for a mere 50 billions may look like a bargain too!

Otherwise I can’t really see the any economically rational reason for this:

http://www.vajma.info/cikk/vajdasag/19370/Anyaorszagi-tamogatas-50-milliard-forint-erteku-gazdasagfejlesztesi-program-indul-Vajdasagban.html

Shortly:
The Government of Hungary will launch a 50 billion economic development program in Vojvodina (a Serbian territory with about 10-15% of ethnic Hungarian population) – announced the Secretary of Foreign Affairs and Trade on Wednesday.
Of this about 30 billion as some kind of loan, the remaining 20 billion as non-repayable State aid.

Well, probably now when all the healthcare, education and employment issues solved at home, when there is no children without proper nourishment to grow up, it really time to help to people outside of Hungary.

Or else.

spectator
Guest

Another lovely little piece illustrating the efforts of the ‘Viktor of the Western Territories’.
In order to create a greater impact of the coming legal proceedings against the EU decision of quotas, the supporters of Orbán’s anti-migration policy signing petition (and collecting data) all over the country. The linked video (made vy using hidden camera) proving the – otherwise susceptible – fact, that let alone the people, but even the Fidesz activists have no clue either, just what what is this really about and why they’re doing it.
Furthermore, it gives some idea of the intellect and mentality of Orbán’s supporters.
Sorry, it’s in Hungarian, with the telltale title: “Terrorists, Soros-hirelings and very rich” – the immigrants, that is!
http://embed.indavideo.hu/player/video/eeb5c6ea2f

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