Viktor Orbán, the politician of European stature, fails as a negotiator

After mulling over the available reports on David Cameron’s short stopover in Budapest, I have come to the conclusion that Viktor Orbán, who is believed to be a maverick politician of mythical powers, failed miserably in his negotiations with the British prime minister. He promised to support three of the four demands Cameron formulated back in November 2015 vis-à-vis the European Union. And Cameron moved not an inch on the most difficult issue of restricting access to welfare payments for migrant workers, mostly from Eastern Europe. If Jarosław Kaczyński hoped to find a good spokesman for the cause of the Visegrád4, he was sadly mistaken. While both men emphasized the need for a strong European Union, in fact both of them have been doing their best to weaken it.

Here are the demands of the British government.

The first demand seeks a special status for Great Britain and others to be free of any obligation to accept the euro as a common currency. In addition, Britain demands that countries outside of the Eurozone should have veto power in the affairs of the Eurozone countries.

The second demand is more reasonable: less bureaucracy and fewer rules and regulations.

The third demand, in my opinion, would be the death knell of the European Union if accepted. It is bad enough that Great Britain doesn’t want to be tied by the EU constitution, which calls on member states to support an ever-closer integration of the Union. It also wants a new provision to be inserted that would allow parliaments of the member states to invalidate any EU law that doesn’t meet the approval of a certain percentage of MPs. For the time being, the details of this demand are not known. The guiding principle would be “a national solution if possible” and a European solution only when necessary.

The fourth demand is the only one that Viktor Orbán found objectionable. Cameron wants to restrict access to benefits for EU migrants both in and out of work. The British government wants to stop those who go to Great Britain from claiming certain benefits until they have been a resident for four years. Moreover, it seems that until now a migrant father or mother could get child support even if the children remained behind. That no longer would be possible. In addition, spouses who are not EU citizens couldn’t enter the country. Despite all the smiles at the press conference, it looks as if Orbán didn’t manage to convince Cameron that the hard-working Hungarians are not economic migrants in Britain.

At a time when united action should be the primary concern of the European Union, attacks on it are coming from three directions. The first is not the doing of the member states: the largely unexpected influx of refugees from Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, some by way of camps in Turkey. But the other two attacks come from the inside–from Great Britain and the Orbán-led Visegrád countries. While Viktor Orbán criticizes the European Union for its inability to show a common resolve, he has been doing nothing else for the last year but weakening the little central authority the EU has. At the same time both he and Cameron claim that they want a strong Europe.

The official government communiqué stressed Hungary’s willingness “to fully support” Cameron’s first three demands. The two men have “complete intellectual and strategic agreement” on these points. Orbán greeted “the rethinking of the role of the national parliaments” and welcomed the idea of “equality with the members of the Eurozone.”

David Cameron and Viktor Orbán at the press conference in Budapest

David Cameron and Viktor Orbán at the press conference in Budapest

When it came to the fourth demand he protested meekly. He mostly objected to the word “migrant,” emphasizing the importance of choosing our words. Indeed, he is the one who is a master of linguistic manipulation. His political advisers came up with the word “migráns,” a foreign word not normally used in Hungarian and now applied exclusively to the Middle Eastern refugees. The word by now has acquired a negative connotation in Hungary due to the hard-hitting government propaganda against the migrants. And here is the British prime minister who talks about Hungarians as migrants. Naturally, as far as Orbán is concerned, they are not migrants because they are EU citizens who have the right to settle and work in another member state. But the word “migrant” in English normally means a person who leaves one country to settle either permanently or temporarily in another.

Orbán didn’t really criticize the British plan to restrict benefits for EU migrants. Rather, he appealed to Cameron by emphasizing the hard-working Hungarians who greatly contribute to the British economy and who take very little in social services. He talked about 50,000 Hungarian citizens in Britain, although that sounds like a very low number to me. At the same time he indicated that the real victims of such a move would be the Poles since about 800,000 of them live and work in Great Britain at the moment. I wonder whether this means that Orbán will leave the hard work of fighting the British plan to the Szydło government. In any case, he indicated that negotiations will continue between Great Britain and the Visegrád4 countries.

The parties of the democratic opposition all criticized Orbán for not defending the interests of Hungarians living in Great Britain. Gábor Fodor’s Magyar Liberális Párt accused Orbán of having a double standard when he portrays the migrants from the Middle East as criminals while he demands special treatment for Hungarian migrants living in Great Britain. According to Együtt (Together), Orbán abandoned his own voters. Attila Mesterházy, who spoke for MSZP, accused Orbán of assisting the British prime minister, who is trying to solve his own domestic problems. In his opinion, Cameron makes no distinction between EU citizens, immigrants, and refugees, and therefore all attempts to force him to think otherwise are useless. MSZP expected a stronger stand in defense of Hungarians in the United Kingdom. LMP demanded policies from the government that would bring those Hungarians who live abroad back home. Of course, DK followed suit, but Péter Niedermüller went even further. He accused Orbán of supporting Cameron’s demands although they may lead to the weakening of Hungary’s position within the European Union. Another DK politician, Szabolcs Kerék-Bárczy, even made an appeal to David Cameron on Facebook:

David Cameron is a true democrat and a wise politician. He believes in liberal democracy and free market economy and refuses an ever more integrated EU. Mr. Cameron looks for allies on these grounds. And his greatest challenge is that most of his anti-EU allies are xenophobes and extreme populists. Will statesman Cameron be ready to tame or handle the Orbáns and Kaczyńskis of our continent? These are politicians who believe in a state-controlled economy, anti-capitalism and who keep making gestures to right-wing extremists in order to build up their exclusive power. Can a British conservative agenda be legitimate, credible and efficient if it seeks support from representatives of obsolete, pre-WWII ideologies? Can a distinguished leader of one of the oldest democracies in the world afford to embrace politicians and parties that aim at destroying Churchill’s dreams?

Kaczyński, Orbán and the likes have millions of supporters as this type of politics always have and will. But, fortunately, friends of a transparent and liberal democracy are still in the majority in Europe. The notions of human dignity, civil liberties and non-corrupt state of affairs are the real grounds for cooperation; considerations of the future of the European Union only come second. I believe we can work out our differences on the EU because democrats are always ready and able to find compromises even after heated discussions. But compromise can and must not be made with those, e.g. Messrs. Orbán and Kaczyński, whose entire goal is to undermine our basic Western values. That is a warning Mr. Cameron may want to keep in mind when talking to Viktor Orbán today.

I fear David Cameron has no intention of heeding Szabolcs Kerék-Bárczy’s advice.

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Minuso
Guest

What can one say? It’s all sadly true. The centrifugal forces in Europe and nationalistic self-interests are on the increase. What a huge pity that a bunch of silly, unintelligent people seem to be able to destroy the greatest peace project on earth!

But this is what happens when politicians don’t lead, don’t convince but are just interested in keeping themselves in power by playing to the base instincts of the electorate. I am ashamed that the chancellor of my home country is one of them. With the enormous resources Germany has, lots of developments could have been steered in a more positive direction by Merkel.

Observer
Guest
@Minuso “..the greatest peace project on earth! … LOVE IT! Economically there is no other way but the EU. Politically however, it’s a completely different world – a patchwork of different cultures, histories and interaction through history. To create a USE is a Herculean task, but not impossible, as the large multi-national empires demonstrate that lasted for many centuries, e.g. Habsburg, Moorish Spain, Rome. But, a great but, one crucial factor is missing now – all these empires were hammered together by a dominant force, just as were the large national states like England, Japan, Germany, Italy, USA. Afterward in many cases all peoples benefited from these unifying structures. The European union formations and NATO developed under economic pressure and the external threat by the USSR, but the latter integrating factor has now faded. I believe that no political union can be kept together for long without some compulsion, in addition to interest. Dictatorships by their very nature don’t fit in any union, let alone in a union of demorats; dictators put their own interests above any and all (e.g. ad extremis N.Korea). Dictatorships usually join in brief alliances for a particular purpose.
Guest

Spot on post. You can have ‘unions’ but the kind of men and their intellectual underpinnings and character determine success or failure in their enterprises. At one point Rome handled Emperor successions pretty well until politician-generals got the idea to use the army to grab power. From then it was all downhill for the existence of ‘Empire’.

Orban and the rest of his political cadre type aren’t generals but sure look like post modern Augusti operating locally but arguably without the deep and strong vision to ostensibly ‘European’ ideals. In the Empire it was something to say , ‘Civis Romanus sum’ (I am a Roman citizen) with all its positive implications of freedom and statehood. But it beggars belief to think he could think that way with ‘ I am a European citizen’.
Does not compute. Surely his group are part of a movement with a different purpose.

Ron
Guest

Interesting, or may be I was paying attention lately. The last few weeks, I hear migrás, migrants, illegalis bevandorló, but only today I hear vendegmunkas, guest laborers, or in Dutch gastarbeiders.

The term used in Dutch, was mainly used in the 70 and 80 for Turkish laborers expected to leave Holland to go back after some time. This did not happen and they became part of the Netherlands.

But why I hear it today? Do they (on TV and radio) expect that the Hungarians abroad come back to Hungary after say 5 years?

petofi
Guest

Cameron will rightly be reviled for his project to destroy the EU and to partner Orban in doing so.

How can the sceptered isle not be grossly disgusted that such a person should represent the people of Shakespeare?

The world has gone mad.

petofi
Guest

How does Victor the O show his displeasure when he can’t convince Cameron to go easy on Hungarians in Britain?
He cancels BBC Entertainment on Hungarian cable.

Subtle, ain’t he?

Hajra Magyarok!

Paul
Guest
This is all very odd. There must be a lot of people in the UK wondering why on earth Cameron singled out Hungary for support. Most people over here know so little about Hungary that they would struggle to even find it on a map. But most of those few who do know something about it have gained their knowledge from articles and TV reports over the last few years – and their overwhelming opinion will be that Hungary is a small, irrelevant country (that they still probably couldn’t find on a map), with a sort of joke, crackpot dictator running it. Why would Cameron want to even be seen dead next to this loony, this odd little leader of a very unimportant country? And the only answer, surely, is that he is desperate. So desperate, indeed, that he no longer worries about us knowing how desperate he is. He has painted himself into a nasty corner entirely of his own making (probably believing he would never have to deliver on his promise), and now, in order to salvage any semblance of respect for his remaining time as PM (he is standing down before the next election), and in order… Read more »
webber
Guest

Here’s a paranoid theory –
Cameron actually wants Britain to leave the EU, but he cannot openly say so (because it would turn so many people off). So, he appears at the side of the crackpot dictator to remind Brits that THIS is what the EU “means,” and to subliminally suggest to the British voter that it might not be a great idea for Britain to stay in an organization that contains the likes of the Great O.

Guest

Nice theory, but I think Cameron might not be clever enough for such a strategy – you are probalby giving him too much credit.

cimbora
Guest

I would love to see the UK leave the EU, I’m certain they would suffer economically. Of course the voters may be OK with that.

I’m sure the Irish, the Belgians, the Dutch etc. are rooting for the leave, they would gain a lot.

In the UK economic growth in the last decade or more came almost entirely from banking and related services and real estate — ie. laundering money for oligarchs from Nigeria to Indonesia. This is unsustainable and leads nowhere. The UK’s industrial base is totally degraded.

There should be at least one nice example for those who entertain the idea of leaving the EU.

webber
Guest

There are European countries outside the EU that are doing alright. Norway, for one. Switzerland is the other.

webber
Guest

Musn’t forget Iceland!
The UK could conceivably leave the EU and keep free trade with EU countries.
The argument against going independent is that the UK would then have no say whatsoever on EU trade legislation.

Fargas
Guest

Iceland has maybe 300k citizens, it’s a micro state.

Switzerland and Norway are somewhat better examples, but then again Norway is a fully-fledged petro-state.

Switzerland is the only example which has a diversified economy.

I really don’t get that preoccupation with the EU in the UK. It’s a fixation or rather a special kind of, more politically correct substitute act.

In Hungary it’s nationalism, it’s the Jews and the EU of course, in the UK it’s the EU and the membership. Instead of dealing with issues like jobs, incomes, health care, sustainability etc. politics deals with the EU, human rights etc.

It’s not a real problem, but politics can’t deal with the real problems like inequality, the stagnation of rural England except for the South East, the dread of the whites about the “dangers” posed by the blacks and Muslims etc.

I think none of the real social or economic issues in the UK have to do specifically with the EU.

webber
Guest

you are right, but then the EU itself hasn’t proven terribly effective a dealing with these problems, has it?

Guest

You forgot to mention “laundering money for oligarchs” in Russia …
Maybe that’s why the strained relations of the EU with Russia weren’t discussed?

PS:
When I’m in a bad mood I also wish for the UK to leave the EU, they don’t really believe in it, or to put it another way:
We’re only in it for the money!
Btw I hear this often from Fideszniks – we don’t really want the EU, can’t accept the rules – we only want the money and the chance for Hungarians to work abroad.

Bowen
Guest

Too paranoid. The right-wing press in the UK (see yesterday’s Telegraph piece by Fidesz-whore Tibor Fischer) is painting Orban as a trustable hero.
The left-wing press think Cameron is bonkers and leading the UK down a dangerous path.

webber
Guest

I agree, it’s a paranoid theory (I said so when I presented it), but then why is Cameron allowing his ministers to campaign against staying in the EU? If he’s for staying in, surely he’d instruct his team to get behind that. Instead, he’s just told them all that they can campaign for getting out. How would you explain that?
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/the-chances-of-britain-leaving-the-eu-may-have-just-gone-up/2016/01/05/a5e47ef0-b3bb-11e5-8abc-d09392edc612_story.html

Basil
Guest

Down with the EU, we want to pollute.

“London failed annual European Union limits on air pollution just eight days into 2016.”
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-08/london-fails-eu-annual-pollution-limits-after-eight-days-of-2016

Guest

Brits have no idea what really goes on in Hungary, but surely the PM there has advisors who should have warned Cameron to stay away. By agreeing to meet with Orbán, Cameron is condoning a corrupt non-democracy.

webber
Guest

Britain is significantly more democratic than the EU is at this stage

For one committed to democracy, most of the opt-outs Cameron wants for Britain are hardly objectionable. Honestly, who outside Britain should care whether or not Britain adopts the Euro? This is an issue at the level of importance of the US not adopting the metric system – it has the significance of nada, zilch, zippo.

British objections to the EU are, in part, precisely because countries such as Hungary can flout democratic norms within the EU with impunity (read the British press, and that comes through clearly).

And Hungarians (and Poles) are economic migrants to Britain – certainly from the perspective of the working-class Brit who sees his or her wages and employment prospects undermined by Hungarians and Poles rushing into the country.

From the perspective of Hungarian social sciences, I believe these people can and should be called economic refugees (gazdasági menekültek).

Observer
Guest

Just a tech note to all users:
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a sovereign state made up of four countries; England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
Great Britain is the biggest island.

bimbi
Guest

Magyar migránsok in Britain? Sure they are – by the tens of thousands – and why? Because of the incompetent economic policy operated in Hungary for the last 5 ½ years by Matolcsy, Várga and Orbán – remember Hungary as the engine that was going to drive the EU out of recession? Well, Orbán is still looking for the wheels for his engine, never mind the motor. The Magyar Great Leap Forward just didn’t happen (except for the Fidesz kleptocrats) and so the stream of Hungarian economic MIGRÁNS continues – driven out from their homeland by incompetence, vindictiveness and theft. And when it comes to working within the EU we should not be surprised that Orbán & Co are better at receiving than giving.

Mihal
Guest

Here Orbán falls into his own trap with words. First he insist on calling fugitives economical migrants and spends half a year an millions to convince all Hungarians that the fugitives are migrants. The Hungarians working in Great Brittain are real economical migrants in every sense of it’s meaning.
The logic of Orbán is to keep calling the fugitives migrants and just to call the migrants something else. Why don’t they just call the Hungarian migrants fugitives? It’s not that for from the truth anyway.

spectator
Guest

Orbán ‘skilful ‘enough to frequently dig himself into such linguistic quagmire like this, but it doesn’t bother anyone in Hungary:

“Hey, he is one of us!”

It certainly means that “hey, he is just exactly such an ignorant moron than any other likewise uncivilised pálinka drinking and sunflower-seed spitting uneducated peasant as us, even if he ‘studied’ in some universities and gained a degree.

He is the right person to lead such country, which want him as their leader, no doubt!

He’s certainly in a dire need of stature like Woody Allen has:

“I’d never join a club that would allow a person like me to become a member.”

Guest

@spectator: That quote is attributed to Allen, but it was said by Groucho Marx a few decades earlier.

spectator
Guest

Now as you mentioned it, of course!
Thank you for the help!

Guest

At the same time both he and Cameron claim that they want a strong Europe.
This is a stupid lie from both of them!
maybe it’s because they are still dreaming of their glorious past and want it back:
The British Empire …
Greater Hungary …

We others know that only a united Europe can compete with the world powers – if the EU does not speak with one voice, then it’s too easy to “divide and conquer” it – as Putin is doing right now with his advances to Orbán.
PS:
The relations with Russia weren’t discussed by Orbán, Kaszinsky and Cameron?
I find that really strange …

spectator
Guest

“The relations with Russia weren’t discussed..”

And how would you supposed to know about, if it were?

Otherwise -in my opinion, that is – the whole charade intended as a smokescreen, to create the illusion that there is substantial mass – and power – behind Cameron, and the smaller actors went along, because it’s an impressive position to be allied with Great Britain against … well, against whatever, really.

It will go home well in all the respective countries while it provides next to nothing as real benefit, neither to the Polish, nor the Hungarians.

But it sounds good, nevertheless.

tappanch
Guest

The international reserves of the Hungarian National Bank on December 31.

2011: 37.774
2012: 33.881
2013: 33.782
2014: 34.578
2015: 30.322, a 12.3% decline y/y

http://www.mnb.hu/letoltes/hu0403-tartalek.xls

tappanch
Guest

Matolcsy took over the National Bank on March 04, 2013.

The reserve was 35.897 billion on Feb 28, 2013.

tappanch
Guest

Hungary has to repay 4.8 billion euros of foreign loans in 2016.

See p. 14

http://akk.hu/uploads/qwydyBr6.pdf

Observer
Guest

I suspect the plundering of the public domain is in such a scale that it affects the macro econ indicators. Mismanagement is also a factor but a smaller one, since this mafia does very little economic management (which maybe is a good thing).

After the robbery of the private pension finds and the bleeding the the health, education and infrastructure to the point of collapse, there are no money left here, but the MNB reserves. The EU cohesion subsidies have already been fully tapped.

The other source was the plan to rob from the future by bringing forward the Paks II with Russian credit – i.e. no control on the spending process.

I don’t know of a robbery of such scale (proportionate) in Western/Central Europe for the last 100 years.

Hajra zemberek.

Observer
Guest
@Minuso “..the greatest peace project on earth! … LOVE IT! Economically there is no other way but the EU. Politically however, it’s a completely different world – a patchwork of different cultures, histories and interaction through history. To create a USE is a Herculean task, but not impossible, as the large multi-national empires demonstrate that lasted for many centuries, e.g. Hapsburg, Moorish Spain, Rome. But, a great but, one crucial factor is missing now – all these empires were hammered together by a dominant force, just as were the large national states like England, Japan, Germany, Italy, USA. Afterward in many cases all peoples benefited from these unifying structures. The European union formations and NATO developed under economic pressure and the external threat by the USSR, but the latter integrating factor has now faded. I believe that no political union can be kept together for long without some compulsion in addition to interest. Dictatorships by their very nature don’t fit in any union, let alone in a union of democrats; dictators put their own interests above any and all (e.g. ad extremis N.Korea). Dictatorships usually join in brief alliances for a particular purpose.
petofi
Guest

Beg to differ: countries where proper education–not only the mind but the emotions–are groomed, people would naturally see what benefits the society (in this case, Europe as a whole). In Hungary, ‘society’ is of no import. Getting ahead personally, preferably at the expense of your neighbours, is the height of achievement. With people like the Hungarians, there is no common good. There’s only ‘screw before you’re screwed’. As many have said, Hungary is about 200 years (at least) from developing a society with the appreciation of norms and values equal to the developed world.

As Orban has amply showed, including Hungary in the EU is like putting worms and termites in the home you’re constructing.

Latefor
Guest

Milton Friedman must have been influenced by a “screw before you get screwed” Hungarian.

Latefor
Guest

I just looked him up: He WAS Hungarian born! I had no idea! 🙂

Andrew J Chandler
Guest
The principle of equality of citizenship within the EU is one which David Cameron will have to accept. However, there are two areas of injustice to UK tax-payers. First of all, healthcare in the UK is not paid for through National Insurance but is funded for all out of taxation. Therefore, existing mutual agreements do not cover the cost of EU migrant workers (correct term in English) and their families in the UK. They were designed at a time when there was a far more even two-way flow of people for work and leisure. However, this is off-set to some extent by the numbers of central Europeans working in the NHS. Still, it would be fairer for their to be a system of equalisation of health costs across the EU. Secondly, in-work tax benefits are payable for children whether or not they are resident in the UK, and at a rate which is based on UK living costs. Since wages and living costs are far lower in countries like Poland and Hungary, this discriminates against British taxpayers. It has been suggested that a ‘sliding scale’ should be devised in order to take account of these differentials. This would be a… Read more »
Andrew J Chandler
Guest

….from outside the EU. Apologies, the spelling should be ‘there’ in line nine.

petofi
Guest

Expecting an eastern european country to be ‘fair’ in dealing with the West is a pipe-dream of monstrous proportions.

The West is there to be lied to and taken advantage of wherever possible.

tappanch
Guest

Orban’s plumber, Mr Meszaros and his family received*
1391 hectares = 2417 “hold” (IVGERVM, Joch) of
PRIME state agricultural land at the big giveaway in the last 2 months

*I would not call this purchase for three reasons. The price is ridiculous (4430 euros/hectare), most people were excluded from bidding, and the ultimate source of his money in the last almost 6 years is well known.

For students of Hungarian history, owners of such huge agricultural land were called magnates or aristocrats in the past. (Rich peasants had 200 hold at most)

http://index.hu/gazdasag/2016/01/08/meszaros_lorinc_es_csaladja_osszesen_1391_hektar_foldet_nyert_az_arvereseken/

tappanch
Guest

Meszaros & family will receive about 320,000 euros a year from the EU just for having the land.

tappanch
Guest
tappanch
Guest

This is how the big giveaway (of 8% of the agricultural land of Hungary to friends & family in 2 months) looks like on the ground:

http://nol.hu/video/nincs-ellenfel-gond-nelkul-veszik-meg-az-allami-foldeket-az-oligarchak-1576601

cheshire cat
Guest
@Paul, I totally agree with your comment @ Andrew Chandler “EU migrant worker” is the correct term, you say. I have heard it, but at the same time, would you call a German engineer or a Swedish doctor an “EU migrant worker”? I’ve never heard it, it just wouldn’t sound right, would it? “Worker” suggest someone low-class, working-class, unqualified, poor, but a lot of Eastern Europeans are doctors in the UK, are they inferior? A more respectful expression would be “citizens of other EU member states”, in my mind. I understand your concerns about the possible unfairness of benefits (you can buy more stuff with your UK-earned child benefit allowance in Hungary eg). However, you need to understand that the huge disparity between wages in Eastern and Western EU can sometimes be an advantage, sometimes a disadvantage for Britain. Is it fair that British people with their British savings can buy bigger houses in Hungary than Hungarians? Therefore pushing up property prices making many of them unaffordable for Hungarians themselves? Following your logic, should the British be charged more for the same property in Hungary? Is it fair that Britain uses ready-made Eastern-European doctors instead of investing in educating and… Read more »
webber
Guest

There are far, far more poorly educated Hungarians working in Britain, than Hungarian doctors (or highly-educated what have you).
Nobody is complaining about the movement of highly-educated people to their countries. It’s the mass of working-class E. Europeans who are the “problem,” for the British working-class, and the working-class is the bulk of the electorate.

As to what to call these people:
I personally know people who have moved to Britain because they could not make it in Hungary. I know a teacher and a stonemason, for example, who couldn’t pay their bills and feed their families on what they earned in Hungary.

Like it or not, the proper name for the mass of Hungarians moving to Britain for existential reasons is “economic refugee.” (gazdasági menekült).

Guest
London Calling! Indeed. My partner came to England as an economic migrant – to save her house – one of those Swiss Franc ever-rising mortgages due to Orban’s and Matolcsy’s mismanagement. And to not understanding finances fully. She started as a lowly unqualified health-care assistant – a job that few English people wanted. However she was strongly self-motivated to take advantage of the training opportunities and enrolled in an apprenticeship scheme and studied hard working long hours too – to pass her level three healthcare and diploma. Furthermore she then applied for University for an adult nursing degree and was rejected by three universities because her ‘erettsegi’ was not fully understood and regarded as not up to university standard. Even though at the time she was eligible to attend Hungarian universities – but didn’t. It was only when another university here in England properly examined it that she was admitted to a very well regarded university with a top nursing faculty. She gets – and will get – a bursary equivalent to double what a fully qualified nurse in Hungary gets per month and her fees are paid by the NHS. These have now ceased and students will be required… Read more »
petofi
Guest

Congratulations to you (for having found her) and to her for her proactive attitude. I never doubted that intelligent, self-possessed Hungarians existed…that’s precisely my problem with most Hungarians–they can’t pick such people as leaders and follow them, do or die.
My disappointment knows no bounds because of this fact; and hence, my wife and I are preparing to leave.

cheshire cat
Guest

“Nobody is complaining about the movement of highly-educated people to their countries.”
De! The Brits are…

cheshire cat
Guest

Sorry, your name is Andrew J Chandler, I apologize. 🙂

petofi
Guest

@charliecharlieh

Next time in Budapest, drop me a line: shakespeareanew@gmail.com

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