The doctors have also had enough

Yesterday I wrote about teacher dissatisfaction stemming from the government’s centralization and reorganization of the educational system. About a week ago the teachers of a gymnasium in Miskolc made public a letter sent to the ministry of human resources, which remained unanswered. Since then thousands of people have joined the crusade for a return to the system in which individual schools had a great deal more autonomy and the teachers had greater freedom in their classrooms.

Today it is time to move on to healthcare, where the situation is as bad as if not worse than in education. In the first place, the government doesn’t spend enough money on healthcare, and the little it spends it spends irrationally. The system is both flawed and underfunded, resulting in a general deterioration of the infrastructure and a lack of basic services to many patients.

Until recently the only sign of serious dissatisfaction was the emigration of large numbers of doctors and even larger numbers of nurses. These professionals are being enticed to move to western European countries, where there is a shortage of doctors and nurses and where salaries are much higher. By contrast, most teachers are more or less tied to the country. Many simply leave the profession.

A functioning hospital somewhere in Hungary / Photo Zoltán Balogh, MTI

A functioning hospital somewhere in Hungary / Photo Zoltán Balogh, MTI

Beginning last month one started to hear about doctors in this or that hospital who threatened to quit because they claimed that the conditions in the hospital were not adequate for them to do their jobs properly. They claimed that the lives of their patients were in jeopardy. One of the main problems is the shortage of nurses. Apparently, right now there is a shortage of 5,000-6,000 nurses in the Hungarian healthcare system.

The first news about doctors revolting against the system came from the Saint Imre Hospital in Budapest where 11 doctors, all anesthesiologists, quit. A few days later 16 physicians in Veszprém threatened to do the same, but eventually the director of the hospital managed to appease them. But by the second half of December 64 doctors from Szeged decided to write a letter to the new and suspiciously quiet undersecretary, Zoltán Ónodi-Szűcs, in which they called his attention to the critical situation in which Hungarian healthcare finds itself after years and years of neglect. These brave souls belong to a Facebook group called “1001 doctors without gratuity.” I think that most readers of Hungarian Spectrum are familiar with the corrupt system without which, according to some analysts, the whole healthcare system would have collapsed a long time ago. Hungarian patients believe that without paying extra to the attending physician they wouldn’t receive decent treatment. Because the government assumes that the doctors receive quite a bit of extra untaxed income in the form of gratuities, they don’t feel any necessity to raise their salaries to a level commensurate with their education and responsibility.

These people consider gratuities to be the canker of the healthcare system. In their letter to Ónodi-Szűcs the doctors claimed, among many other things, that the practice of gratuities negatively affects the quality of care provided and “renders the training of younger doctors impossible.” This last claim might not be immediately understandable to those outside the profession, but I have an inkling of what these doctors have in mind. Doctors higher up on the totem poll make sure that they perform all procedures that might bring a large gratuity, and thus younger doctors have only limited opportunities to perform certain operations. This was the case already in the Rákosi period, and it looks as if it hasn’t changed since. Naturally, doctors in high positions who are the beneficiaries of the system want no change.

Dinner in a Hungarian hospital

Dinner in a Hungarian hospital

It was at this point that Zoltán Balog, in an interview on Mokka, an early morning show on TV2, expressed his surprise that the doctors think that “gratuities are not good for them.” Later in the conversation he added that in the last four years the government has regularly raised doctors’ salaries, but “we can’t expect to raise salaries tenfold in order to catch up with the west.” Moreover, the situation can’t be that bad, he claimed. After all, “in the last 25 years we have kept saying that Hungarian healthcare is close to collapse, but it has continued to work just fine to this day.”

None of the supporters of the group found Balog’s answer acceptable. They were especially offended by the fact that “Balog talked about the gratuity as if it were a natural ingredient of healthcare.” They demanded answers to specific questions. How long will gratuities be accepted in healthcare? When will the government convene a group of experts to discuss matters with the doctors? What kinds of concrete steps does the government expect to take in 2016 to improve the financial well-being of doctors and others in the healthcare system? The fact that the Hungarian Medical Association urged its members—and membership is compulsory–to join the group will ensure that many more doctors will add their support.

By early January 781 doctors signed the letter of the “1001 doctors without gratuity.” By January 12 the numbers swelled to well over 2,200 when 1,500 pediatricians joined the group.

It is telling that the slavishly servile Magyar Idők, which supports all of the government’s actions, decided that it could not back Balog and his undersecretary on this issue. An editorial that appeared on January 5, titled “Doctors and nurses on the waiting list,” expressed the belief that it was time to raise salaries substantially. Otherwise, a strike might be unavoidable, especially since a new union has been formed and the likelihood of doctors, nurses, and teachers creating a united front is likely. But more about that tomorrow.

January 17, 2016
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Guest

That’s a much better meal than the ones I’ve seen posted on Facebook–3 pieces of bread with a piece of very ordinary cheese on top, all wrapped in something like Saranwrap. But what is that white foam on the green noodles?

Member

It is not white foam. It looks to me that it is icing sugar. It is likely pasta with grits, icing sugar, and eggs sunny side up.

Member
Actually it was 6 anesthesiologists (out of a total of 8) who quit Saint Imre Hospital in November. This is a pretty critical situation, as without anesthesiologists a hospital can not function. One of those anesthesiologists is now working in some Caribbean country, so I’ve heard, which I’m sure is quite a better environment for them. Saint Imre is a special case in that it is apparently being run by a vain and pompous fool who is running the hospital, which incidentally has been considered one of the best public hospitals in Hungary, into the ground. But supposedly he has strong ties with Parliamentary speaker Kövér, so he is untouchable. The Csolnoky Hospital in Veszprém is also a special case, in that the mass resignations there were sparked by a head doctor there who terrorizes staff and patients alike. The doctors have complained about her repeatedly, but to no avail, so they quit. I also know people connected with that hospital, and the rumor is that she’s having an affair with one of its directors, so she is untouchable, no matter how many doctors resign because of her. On the other hand, the fact that these special cases are allowed… Read more »
LwiiH
Guest

I have stepped in Saint János once and I will never step into it again. It should be blown up. The hospital is a disaster, a cesspool. The Dr.s there all seem to have sunk to the level of the environment they work in and I don’t blame them. It, with many of the other hospitals, are known as places you go to die. Saint Imre was quite a set up in comparison. The place looked normal. In fact I have friends that paid to be able to use this hospital instead of St. János.

But then, those that can afford health care go to some of the best clinics you can imagine so they neither see or care about the state of things and there are a couple of hospitals

Member

I’ve driven into Szent János several times at night for their emergency room services. It’s exactly like entering the movie set for a horror film. Unbelievably creepy.

Fun fact about Szent Imre Hospital: before the war, it was actually a therapeutic mineral spa attached to an upscale hotel. For some reason, after the war it was turned into a hospital. So I presume that’s why it is so different from other older hospitals in Hungary.

Guest

Readers may be interested in the Tumblr site known as “Kórházi koszt” or more loosely, Hungarian Hospital Fare. Lots of examples of typical Hungarian hospital food and surroundings. Truly depressing.

http://korhazikoszt.tumblr.com

webber
Guest

Eva – If the editor who wrote that editorial calling for raises for medical personnel was not fired, then you can be fairly certain that Magyar Idok got instructions from the paper’s government handler to publish it.

Guest

I have had good experience, with expert doctors, at János Korház (hospital), but found many of the nurses quite brutal.

When my son was quite small, he had an accident at home and we called the ambulance and off we went to the hospital. As it happened a relative who was a medical student from the UK was visiting us and when I asked what he thought of the medics, he said hey had done everything correctly and according to the books but that they had done it all quite brutally.

There seems to be a resentment of patients in the healthcare serivce here, possibly due to the bitterness medical staff feel about their appaling working conditions.

After being admitted once with serious food poisoning following a meal in one of the shopping malls in district II, the nurse who was trying to insert a drip into my hand kept jabbing and jabbing with the needle until my hand looked like a prickly pear.

When I asked why she was being so brutal, she summed up the Hungarian Health service quite succintly by stating \”if you want gentle, you can go private and pay for it\”.

Jon Van Til
Guest
I’m a sociologist, so pardon my asking a few questions about this tipping practice, which is unfamiliar to me. I am accustomed to rewarding underpaid service providers with a few coins or even a bill or two–waitstaff in restaurants, taxi drivers, etc. And I’ve seen in movies how tips are delivered to corrupt politicians (leave a suitcase full of case behind after a meeting) and strip-tease dancers (slip a note under their briefs). But I cannot envision how to give a tip to a doctor–does one add it to the bill or, really, hand it directly to the professional while she or he attends to whatever pressing need that has delivered me into care? Does one provide this pour-boire (pardon my French) before an intervention or only after the delivery of a satisfactory service? Is this another of those folkways learned in state socialist times and then adapted to a new world in which “everything is for sale” (as my colleague Robert Kuttner puts it in a very good book with that title)? Are there courses in the etiquette of receiving such gratuities in Hungarian medical schools? Is there a passing answer when the subject comes up on exams about… Read more »
webber
Guest
Jon Van Til The “tip” for medical personnel is always given clandestinely. Generally, it is hidden in an envelope (though everyone knows what’s in those envelopes), and the recipient very quickly slips the envelope into a pocket or drawer. These tips are only paid to doctors in the public system – Hungary’s “NHS”, which is theoretically free. If you go to a private clinic, where everything is billed, there are no tips. The tips for doctors can be very large. Patients or their families have made webpages on which they summarize how much is expected, and it IS expected – a doctor may express displeasure or do something worse if s/he doesn’t get the money. In some cases, people share their experiences with individual doctors. For general guidelines on “tips”, see this: http://testunk.e-goes.com/halapenz-tarifak/ So, for a birth without complications, the avg. paid is 200,000 forints – in cash, no receipt given. No tax paid (they are supposed to pay tax on tips- but…) For heart surgery, 150,000 is normal – according to the webpage above. I would bet that most pay more. Then there are the tips for nurses on duty. If you want your relative to receive “better” treatment,… Read more »
Jon Van Til
Guest

I see, Webber; thanks. So it’s like leaving that extra bill for the garbage collectors when there’s an overflow bag, or those 100 forints for the toilet attendant at Cafe Europa. These doctors sure do run in exclusive company! But I guess their services are more important than bus drivers or Tesco cashiers–or are their “suggestions” on that website too?

Istvan
Guest

Webber that was one of the best short explanations of the current medical gratuity system I have ever seen. It is my understanding that the same system existed under Kadar, or that matter in the USSR. Even though I visited Hungary under Kadar I had no interaction with the medical system so I had zero first hand experience with it. I only heard stories about tips or bribes from my family.

Many Hungarian-Americans here argue that the medical system was far better under Kadar, but that the gratuity system existed and that medical staff with cash income from bribes did better under communism than they do today. I would be interested in your thoughts on that issue, or the thoughts of others.

webber
Guest

Istvan
Doctors who are in highly-tippable positions are doing very well indeed.
Doctors who are not in such positions are scraping by.
So, anesthesiologists are not in a great position because they rarely meet patients, and “tips” come directly from patients.
By contrast, most obstetricians are very, very wealthy. If the tax authorities were to compare the wealth of obstetricians with their declared incomes… (in Hungary tax authorities can do this, and can levy fines if there is a large discrepancy)… then a lot of obstetricians would leave Hungary.
A few years ago an obstetrician was caught on camera telling a pregnant woman that she had not given him enough and would have to cough up more if she expected a comfortable birth. This was a man working in a state-hospital, where care is theoretically free.

Guest

Istvan: “It is my understanding that the same system existed under Kadar.. ”
It sure did.
When I began to visit Hungary in the late sixties I got acquainted with a surgeon who possessed a wonderful house at the Balaton, a select appartment on the Castle Hill and a valuable art collection. All from his patients. Another doctor I met got many more bottles of original Whisky and Cognac from his patients than he could consume, so he routinely sold the gifts (excuse the expression) back to the shop where they came from.

Guest

Istvan… Your last paragraph was the situation as I came across it in \’across-the-pond\’ discussions. If you wanted better care you had to \’pay\’ for it on the side. It was a given.
I took it that it wasn\’t the best of all worlds but the Hungarians at that time thought it better than no care at all so they went along with that system. I see apparently the whole system is worse.

FYI, I think if I lived in my ancestral country I wouldn\’t be here. In my family we have cardiology issues. My uncles died fairly young. I attribute it to lack of concern for care and the infrastructure. But that is my opinion.

Guest

Incidentally your comment brought up a lively discussion in our household on Hungarian-Americans. In our circle they weren’t exactly heavy users of healthcare. In fact they hardly used it. But no matter they lived fairly long lives.

In hindsight I don’t think they thought too much of doctors because of their experience back home. Here we all know how doctors can easily run up the health tab, with tests and more tests. I know that came into their choice of utilizing care. They didn’t want to see those resulting costs winding up as ‘tips’ for those providers.

Harald
Guest

@Jon No, it’s not “like leaving that extra bill for the garbage collectors when there’s an overflow bag”.

webber’s description was correct. You have to pay “Dankgeld” (kind of “thank-you-money”) before you receive any treatment. We do not even talk about special treatment.

Otherwise you may end up at the hospital with no treatment at all for days, as one relative of mine experienced. As soon as he finally paid they remembered what their duty is and did treat his problems.

spectator
Guest

I’ve learned about “that” envelope a rather special way once in Hungary.
I needed to send a few mail and went in to a little shop right beside one of the hospitals. The shop sold just about everything what anybody will need in there or take to someone, so I asked if they sell envelopes too?
“But of course, how many?” – the shopkeeper answered, I took some, then I asked for stamps too.
“Stamps? I don’t sell any stamps here! Try the post office…!” I didn’t get it.
“Why would you sell envelopes, but no stamps?”
“Well, you know… “ and she mimicked the gesture of someone putting something in a pocket.

Never late to learn a thing or two, or so they say.

Member

“Tip?” Did someone say, “tip?”

Folks, here’s the situation: A state employee makes an unspoken threat to withhold public services unless the taxpayer makes an under-the-table payment straight into his pocket.

Bad enough when the taxpayer is trying to get a building permit. But in the case of health care, witholding of public services may result in death or dismemberment.

This is no tip. It’s a BRIBE.

Guest

It’s blackmail …..

divvy up or you won’t get the treatment.

Guest

Gratuity is a rather mild, anodyne way of describing what actually is involved with hálapénz.

Tips are given after a service is delivered; the hálapénz envelope is expected in advance.

In actual fact, hálapénz is a bribe given to doctors and nurses in the hope that the level of attention and quality of treatment that they would provide would be of a minimally decent standard.

It is a corrosive, thoroughly corrupt practice built into the Hungarian public health system, which then provides one of the key justifications for corrupt and mendacious politicians to catastrophically underfund the system.

Another rotten Hungarikum, one among numberless others.

Guest
London Calling! Yes! I’m always amazed how common it is to put sugar in pasta in a main – savoury – course in Hungary and in other main-course dishes too. About the doctors. It has been a revelation to talk to Hungarian nurses about how they care for the patients. My partner is doing a nursing degree in England and has discussed nursing practice with them from that perspective. Whilst the NHS is far from perfect, dementia patients, for example, who have suffered a fall and are in hospital for recovery sometimes have to be monitored 24hrs a day to keep them safe and to stop them wandering in their confusion. A healthcare worker will steer them back to their beds many many times in a day. To my partner’s amazement these types of patients are routinely tied to their beds in Hungary to stop them wandering – without anyone in the profession batting an eyelid. This is strictly forbidden in English wards. They are usually tethered to the bed with the bottoms of pyjamas and cords. Only if someone is ‘sectioned’ in England can they be put in a locked ward – for their own protection. Otherwise every patient… Read more »
Guest

As an afterthought I should not call them ‘gratitude’ payments – in quotes to denote irony.

No, they are blackmail payments. Blackmail pure and simple. Corruption.

In future I will refer to them as blackmail payments.

Yes blackmail payments milked by doctors and nurses.

Tell it like it is.

Guest

zsarolás kifizetések?

Guest

Ransom – váltságdíj

bimbi
Guest
“Doctors and nurses on the waiting list”? Gosh, a revolution must have broken out atMagyar Idök. No, the plain fact is that virtually all of the Hungarian people are on the waiting list – waiting for this government which wallows in money for idiocies including € 50+ million for the power-crazy bid for the 2024 Olympics, € 500 million wasted on football stadiums, literally untold millions of EU money dissipated on, among other things, reconstructing the Admiral Horthy Kossuth tér and so on and so on. In this context Balog Zoltán is irrelevant as is the unfortunate Zsoltán Ónodi-Szűcs whose function is, of course, to form a barrier between the people, the nurses, the doctors and the health care system on the one hand and Orbán Viktor on the other. We can be sure that the government, its senior officials and the Fidesz oligarchs suffer no problems in the availability of healthcare. They have provided excellently for themselves. It is the remainder of the population that is treated with dismissive contempt. The “hálópénz problem” is a complete red herring. It is constantly raised by this corrupt and dishonest government as an excuse not to face the state of neglect and… Read more »
bibi
Guest

The doctors – just as most teachers – are all Fidesz voters and very conservative politically (always have been).

Orban doesn’t care because they will vote Fidesz anyway (for many doctors Jobbik would be too working class and the left wing is an absolute no-go) and most voters (patients) don’t vote according to his/her opinion about health care.

There is no incentive for Orbanto do anything , he will give a little raise if any when he thinks it’s worth it politically.

Guest

It is scary to think that most doctors are Fidesz voters, though I suspect you are right, bibi.

And I know from experience that most Hungarian teachers are Fideszers. All the more reason to support those brave souls in Miskolc who are taking a stand, whatever their politics are.

Does anyone know of doctors here who are not Orbán supporters?
And does anyone know, or has any research been done here to evaluate if there is a difference between how doctors treat their patients if the patient is percieved to be someone against the government?

What happens if a Fidesz doctor knows that a ptient is Jewish, for instance?

webber
Guest

time4change
I don’t know about doctors, but about teachers, I disagree, based on personal experience. I don’t think profession and political preference have much to do with one another in this case.

webber
Guest

And on doctors – I wouldn’t bet on that either. Poll data could show something, but is there any based on profession?

Guest

My own local GP, or \”házi orvos\” I like very much, but a partner in the same surgery has decorated her consultation rooms with several crosses.

I find this repelent, not because I have anything against Christianity ( I certainly do not) but because in Hungary, this is shorthand for announcing to the world that one is a staunch Fidesz supporter.

The political symbol aside, I cannot bear images of the cross which are after all a depiction of unimaginable torture, no less grizzly than violence on TV.

Why not have a beautiful and benign staute of Mary and baby Jesus, as a symbol of nurturing and caring. Much more appropriate in a place of healing, which is the fundamental fucntion of a doctor\’s surgery.

And these crosses are popping up everywhere, including a proudly Fidesz, blingish and expensive, deli around the corner from us, where customers can enjoy their cappuccinos while being entertained by the scene of torture gracing the walls of the cafe.

webber
Guest

A cross is most certainly NOT proof, or even evidence of support for Fidesz. A picture of Orban, however… (and I have seen some, here and there).
Cross or no cross, your GP might well be a supporter of that party – and so what? One doctor is not all doctors.

Guest

It would be heartening if you are right, webber, but is it not the case that all heads of schools are now Fideszers? And if so, they will be more inclined to hire teachers who are the same.

webber
Guest

No, all heads of schools are not Fideszers.
I know one in particular who is not. She’s not the member of any party, and she has been in her position since before 2010.

onedin
Guest

Yes, there is a strong correlation. It’s not like you have to be conservative if you are a doctor or a teacher. but more like already conservative people (kids from such families) elect to become doctors and teachers. For them traditional values like respect, politeness, orderliness, discipline are key – so not surprisingly they love Fidesz.

People of the traditional elite (teachers, judges, doctors) are all overwhelmingly (I would say 60-70% or more in my experience) conservative and mostly come from the traditional Christian middle class, many from professional dynasties, going back to many generations very often from Buda.

Like it or not, that’s the case. Orban knows this and acts accordingly. He can (and will) disregard the doctors because most of them will keep quiet.

webber
Guest

I disagree. I know too many teachers, and one or two doctors, who despise Fidesz.
If you are so sure of yourself, show me poll data and prove you are right.

onedin
Guest

There are always exceptions, sure, I said in my experience some 70% were pro-Fidesz. This means that 30%, a substantial minority are independent, undecided etc.

I cannot bring data but I’m really hard pressed to think about any doctor I know (and I know quite a few) who could be described as a liberal or leftist based on the values he/she holds.

I know some who aren’t die-hard fideszniks (let’s say only mildly), some are probably apolitical (especially women are not expected to deal with “politics” so they don’t communicate political values as male doctors do), but that’s about it.

Maybe the non-fideszniks already left Hungary, maybe they are lurking somewhere but in my long experience most are quite openly hostile to liberalism and lefty ideas.

webber
Guest

Have you met even 100 Hungarian doctors?
I can’t say I have.
Yet a proper sample would be at least 1,000.
Your (and others’) idle speculation on this is grinding the mills for Fidesz. You seem to have missed the Fidesznyik-triumphalist tone of the one who started this thread, though it is unmistakable.
Tell me, if the majority of doctors are for Fidesz, why are so many of them leaving Fidesz’s Hungary?

Guest

Money.

Guest

\”traditional values like respect, politeness, orderliness, discipline are key – so not surprisingly they love Fidesz\”

I can date my interest in politics in Hungary back to the pro-Fidesz demos organised many years ago after Orbán lost an election.

I had no idea what was going on, or who was who, but was shocked that in the middle of Europe, seemingly respectable looking people expressed such aggression, nastiness and rudeness, en masse. These were the Fidesz supporters, I learned.
I found it disgusting and alarming.

There is a distinction between being \”respectable\”, and being polite and courteous, and your notion that only Christian families display civilized manners, is as outrageous and untrue, as it is downright rude .

As for orderliness and discipline (which in themselves are perfectly fine) Mussolini promised to make the trains run on time. Do you admire him too? A nIce man he was, no doubt quite polite as he tortured his enemies.

onedin
Guest

Please don’t argue with me. People can be nasty and at the same time self-righteous and demanding respect by others. Haven’t you heard the successful Fidesz slogan more respect to Hungary? It worked, Fidesz is popular. Conservative voters demand it and Fidesz delivers it. Who said people must be consistent? It is a liberal myth, unfortunately totally internalized by liberals that people are rational and logically consistent and when it turns out they are not, there’s a huge surprise every time.

Guido Maggi
Guest

Amazing article, thank you very much!

Observer
Guest

Fidesz fought tooth and nail the healthcare reforms proposed by ministers Lajos Molnár and Ágnes Horváth in 2006/7, which were the most comprehensive, the best researched and the most debated reform package in 25 years. It considered co-payment (vizit díj), personnel pay and conditions, multiple health insurance providers, hospital system restructuring, etc.
OV celebrated the predictable referendum results by “Hungary won!”.
He was lying as usual, it was his political score, at the expense of the people’s health, as obvious now.

However the data on healthcare spending is pretty complicated to interpret; I prefer the realistic, but simplistic per -capita/PPP data. In this OECD one Hungary is at the bottom:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_total_health_expenditure_per_capita
The structure of the expenditure complicates the picture, e.g. composite WHO table: http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.75.

A couple of positive examples, which are irrelevant re the overall condition of the HC system, but show that things can be improved even within the current framework:
– The general conditions, organization and attitudes in the Hearth Institute Clinic in Pécs.
– The general conditions and attitudes in the Uzsoki Hospital in Budapest.
– The practice of one specialist examining patients in two adjacent surgeries supported by two administrators.

spectator
Guest
Well, don’t you ever forget that “Hungay performs better”, and anyway, the ‘Great Leader’ discovered new and innovative ways to take care of the health of ‘his’ people, you see. The only problem is that the decadent West and the decadent westerners just can’t get it! Because it so new and ‘unorthodox’, and already every other country is envious for the great success, and even the EU (sic!) started follow The Viktor! Indeed! And if you still don’t understand a thing it’s due to the translation, because the words have different meaning in Hungary, as we all know… Since I’m privy to some of the secrets, I tell you some. “Unnatural Selection” — Correcting Mr.Darwin and Mother Nature at the same time, the breakthrough method is — not the “survival of the fittest” but the “survival of the richest”! In this way not only the’ll get rid of the poor — and the poverty, thereof — but even ensure that the wealth remains in the hands of the ‘chosen ones’, so dynasties can prevail from now on! “Be healthy by supporting sport” — Investing in stadiums instead of hospitals and healthcare, the ‘Great Leader’ laid the solid foundations of the… Read more »
Member

CONFIGURATIONS
Dear Commenters,
I went through some of the settings of the Site, and did some tweaking with the hope of resolving couple of issues.
1. Signing in, and the wishes circle.
2. extra fonts

As with any changes they may be some other issues pop-up. Please let me know if there are issues….

also, those who had difficulty to sign in as Members via WP, can you please try. Thanks!

observer683
Guest

Test

Observer
Guest

Test – logged in and was posted it from WP, but still shows Guest and there is no editing.
Any instructions re “proper”log into WP ?

Member

Darn…. Let me tweak!

Member

Dear \”Configurations\”,

IMHO: Get rid of the pointless (from a user perspective) middle layer Discus system entirely. Rather install Jetpack, and allow people to just sign in using just their WordPress, Facebook, Google, or Twitter account directly.

Member

It has nothing to do with Discus! Discus is simply an other layer to sign in with. The comet section is not driven by Discus. I can disable Discus but it would not resolve the problem, just like disabling Twitter or Facebook sign in would not solve the problem. WP native comment does not allow “layering” and this is why we had to look for some other comment option. As comments were not threaded, people were lost in who is replying to what comment.

Member

I made two, separate, points:

1) I did not say your problem was due to Disqus. But, while you where \”here\” working on the comment system, I just wanted to freely suggest to get rid of Disqus. It is annoying that I have to use a second layer to simply use my Google account.
2) Are you using Jetpack now? If not, have you tried Jetpack?

Guest

OT: Dear Some1–I understand Éva’s “Author” designation, and your–and Radium Potato’s “Member” designation. Plus the “Guest” identification. But there are a few of us with no designation. I thought I was signing in to be a “Member”, but only succeeded in erasing the “Guest” appellation. What should I be doing?

Guest

gedance?

Don’t fret! You are logged in – to WordPress.

Look at the top of Eva’s website and you should see: ‘howdy gedance’

So this means you can edit your posts for a while – which seems to me to be the only difference from before.

Try a test post – and then try an edit and it should confirm my explanation!

If not then I’m Radium Potato!

Good luck!

Member

LOL

Just to clarify. We have tried to use simply Jetpack before. Honestly I cannot recall why we had to implement other ways to comment. There were things that did not work on one thing, there were things that did not work on other things. There will be not a single solution that will make everyone happy. Neither Eva or I are programmers, and we simply try to switch buttons on and off to try to make the site most enjoyable. We do not plan to annoy anyone, rest assured.

webber
Guest

Health – Hungary no. one in the world for deaths to “trachea, bronchus, lung diseases” (see chart in link), which includes lung cancer. No. 2 is N. Korea. Three is Armenia. 4. Serbia. 5. China. All countries with high smoking rates and/or poor air quality (air quality in Budapest can be abysmal – for a European city – in Winter).
http://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/ng-interactive/2016/jan/18/top-five-causes-of-death-worldwide-infographic

Guest

You know I just find it crazy that on ‘health’ you’d think the country and its leaders would get things ‘right’ from those ‘olden golden’ days of ancient Kadarian Hungary. Looks like things haven’t moved or rather regressed. Science has made more progress in knowing about the state of the universe post BigBang but Hungary still obviously hasn’t learned how to make its citizens healthier and deliver good solid respectable and dignified care to them.

Steve Martin’s Saturday Nite Live comedic ‘Theodoric of York’ skit , where Englishmen got the ‘best’ in medieval health care, kind of brings an insightful touch to a serious subject. Theodoric always thought he had the right ‘protocols’. …;-)….

Guest

Curious where those in the medical profession go when THEY need health care. Love to know if travel tix go to a korhaz in Siofok which brands itself as ‘healing by the ‘lake’ or a jaunt farther ‘West’. Can’t see them going East. Situation arguably could be worse.

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