Conservative critics of the Orbán regime: The József Eötvös Group

I’m convinced that “something is in the air.” There is a growing dissatisfaction in all strata of Hungarian society, which may signal the beginning of more active political participation on the part of those who find the current government’s policies injurious to the interests of the country and devastating for the majority of the Hungarian people.

I already covered the demands of teachers and physicians, which are professional in nature but may at any time morph into political opposition. After all, when students and teachers complain about outdated teaching methods and demand fewer restrictions and more time for independent thinking, they are expressing views incompatible with the undemocratic worldview of the Orbán regime. As we discussed in the comments, most likely the majority of the teachers and doctors who today are challenging the government were Fidesz voters. And if Jenő Rácz of the Veszprém hospital thinks that Hungarian healthcare is on the brink of collapse—something that the lowly nurse Mária Sándor also says but no one listens to—then, believe me, the problem is serious.

As we know very well, there are problems in other fields as well. The economy, of which Viktor Orbán and György Matolcsy are so proud, is struggling if one looks beneath the surface. The spectacular 3.6% economic growth in 2014 was due solely to the unusually large size of subsidies that arrived from Brussels. The state of democracy and the rule of law are also in deep trouble.

Until now only so-called liberal economists and legal scholars criticized the Orbán government’s policies and its trajectory. But now so-called conservative economic and legal thinkers have also felt the need to sit down and exchange thoughts on the sorry state of the Hungarian economy and legal system. I want to emphasize up front that the opinions of these conservative thinkers are practically indistinguishable from those of the liberals. Looking at the situation from the outside, I simply can’t understand why these two groups cannot get together.

The idea of organizing a group of conservative economists and legal scholars came from Tamás Mellár, professor of economics at the University of Pécs, and András Jakab, director of the Institute of Jurisprudence of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Mellár was the director of the Central Statistical Office (Központi Statisztikai Hivatal / KSH) between 1998 and 2003. Jakab’s curriculum vitae is most impressive. He taught at the University of Liverpool, the University of Nottingham, and the William and Mary Law School and was research fellow at the Max Planck Institute.

Their idea was to organize small gatherings to discuss topics of importance. Jakab, the moderator, normally invites two speakers who approach the given topic from different perspectives. Their last meeting took place a few days ago. Although they advertised their meetings on Facebook, this is the first time that the public learned of the József Eötvös Csoport (Group).  The group was named for the minister of education between April and September 1848 and again between 1867 and 1871. Eötvös was a moderate, a centrist, and a devoted follower of Ferenc Deák. Today we would call him a liberal conservative.

The group was established in March 2015 by Péter Ákos Bod, Attila Chikán, László Csaba, András Jakab, András Jóri, Béla Kádár, Tamás Mellár, László Sólyom, Péter Tölgyessy, and László Urbán. It would take up too much space to identify each of these people, but all of them were involved in some capacity with the governments of either József Antall or Viktor Orbán. Bod was even the candidate for prime minister for a few days in 2006 when Viktor Orbán felt that without him Fidesz had a better chance of winning the election.

In the front row László Sólyom and Béla Kádár

In the front row László Sólyom and Béla Kádár

I’m not sure how many meetings the group has held since March 2015, but I know that they had one on “corruption and economic decline” where the two speakers were Miklós Ligeti, director of Transparency International Magyarország, and Balázs Szepesi, strategic director of the Hétfa Kutatóintézet (Hétfa Research Institute). Szepesi at one point described those responsible for the Hungarian economy today as blind people trying to fix a watch with a hammer. There was also a discussion on “national independence and European integration.”

The last meeting was about the nature of Viktor Orbán’s system. Is it populism or something else? One of the speakers was András Körösényi, about whose ideas I wrote already in a post titled “Orbán system or Orbán regime: Debate on the nature of the Hungarian government.” This time Körösényi, a political scientist, came to the conclusion that although there are certain identifiable populist elements in Orbán’s political system, his government most of the time ignores the popular will. It is better to describe Orbán’s decisions as based on “oligarchic interests.” This description of the Orbán regime is not too different from Bálint Magyar’s mafia state. Yet they come from different sides of the Hungarian political spectrum.

Although the organizers insist that this is not an opposition group, the speakers and discussants express views critical of the present regime. Sooner or later these conservative thinkers must face the fact that their discussions are more than “offering a good example of civilized discourse.” I very much doubt that any of the founders of the József Eötvös Group believe that Orbán’s political system can be “reformed.”

This became evident to me when I listened to Antónia Mészáros’s interview with Péter Ákos Bod on ATV. Bod, the former Fidesz prime minister delegate, talked about his worries over the rule of law and economic progress that has been halted. He criticized the economy, in which corruption is widespread. He described the existing economic system as a far cry from a true market economy. He criticized the ad hoc nature of economic decisions and the lack of professional expertise. The economy is slowing, he said, and the government is not prepared for the difficulties that will ensue when the flow of money from Brussels slows or even stops. Every time policy makers sense an economic slowdown they come up with some new idea that is supposed to remedy the situation. One such remedy is the idea of giving 10 million forints to families willing to have three children who want to buy a new home. The idea is fraught with hidden pitfalls which are not yet evident. Such fiddling with the economy usually has adverse consequences in the future.

How often did we hear all these criticisms not from “conservative” economists but from “radical liberals,” as Fidesz politicians like to call them? But the message is the same, regardless of whether it comes from the left or the right. The whole system is flawed, and sooner or later it will come to a sorry end. And then the country will need all these people to try to fix the problems.

January 23, 2016
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Zoli
Guest
I have to admit that I find the posts on this site amusing, which is why I occasionally come here. I find it amusing, because authors, as well as readers just don’t get it! Fact is, Orban and his government are popular, because for the past five years they in fact made a lot of right calls on important issues which really matter. There are plenty of examples in economic matters, such as the IMF, FX debt and so on, where even the regular ratings agency reports point to the fact that decisions led to Hungary’s economic foundations improving. But I will not get into that right now. Let us focus on the latest major issue, namely the migrants. Hungary decided to build a fence last year, which has been criticized by the left opposition, and I am sure that 99% of readers on this site were against it as well. It is just now emerging however just how intuitive this decision was, and how it saved Hungary and Hungarians from suffering some disastrous consequences. It is just now emerging that a panicking EU elite is considering shutting Greece out of Schengen and potentially blocking its borders with Bulgaria and… Read more »
Member

So because You say so Zoli, we should get it? You have the perfect vision to see how great Fidesz is. Did they make some decent decisions? Yes. there is a great Hungary saying “Vak tyuk is talal szemet” (Even blind hens find some kernels.) We have to disagree my friend about the immigration issue. Just because Hungary and some of Europe does not figure out he process, it does not mean that refugees should be turned back. Take a look on Canada in your free time, when not trying to find all the miracles that Orban come up with.

Guest

Many of us on here laugh – don’t smile – at how desperate you are to pick out the only edible parts of the curate’s egg. How you suck up your Master’s propaganda.

How you try and put a shine on fool’s gold.

These opportunities will (are) becoming fewer and fewer.

As the tide turns we will experience the slow inexorable demise of an idiot.

A case of he who laughs last, laughs longest.

But so sad for Hungary though.

Latefor
Guest

Don’t count your chickens before they hatch!
There is a brilliant article in today’s Economist re: migrant crises is Germany.
So much for your vision!

Guest

This is a post from The Nurse in Black………

“Jani January 18, 2016 7:45 pm

Sorry, Zoli’s post is repulsive to me.
The not so bright Latefor got herself a worthy partner in Zoli.
Where can I find Hungarians with decency and integrity?

Jani – you have amazing perspicacity.

Latefor
Guest

Whilst the Oh So Birghts are busy with “creative destruction” the “not so brights” -like myself- are studying the Bible. There is not much we can do. For now, that is.

Latefor
Guest

Zoli – This is Eva’s blog, with some arrogant, bloodthirsty commentators. You must pray to God and ask for ‘protection’ if you want to survive in here. Some of these people could seriously mess with your mind. Be strong! Good luck!

Guest
@Zoli (January 23, 2016 7:06 pm). Regarding the fence, I do not only admit that it was the right idea, but was a supporter of building the fence from the start, though being a liberal conservative or if you will, a libertarian, I am a bit of a square peg in a round hole on this forum, a strange species of bird, or as we would say in Australia “a shag on a rock.” Regarding the achievements of Hungary’s unorthodox economic policies, the jury is still very much out, but the prospects of eventual success are exceedingly dim, notwithstanding short term successes primary due to the subsidies being received from Brussels. Defying the economic laws of gravity is in the end a fool’s errand. It never works in the longer run, and rarely in the short run without massive external subsidies. Furthermore, if it is indeed the case that there are currently four million Hungarians under the poverty line, those short term successes due to getting regular “fixes” from Brussels, like an economic drug addict, sound very hollow indeed. The Horthy regime was said to rule over three million beggars from 1920 to 1945; in the 21st century, the Orbán… Read more »
Guest

In other words, Orbán for contemporary Hungarians is what Horthy was for a previous generation, or what Hitler was for that generation of Germans.

The tragedy of yesteryear repeated as today’s melodrama and farce.

The Hungarian optics are not the best, to put it mildly . . . .

Zoli
Guest
Well, Balint, if you can point to a major policy which if done differently in order to prevent those 4 million from living below poverty, be my guest. What makes you think that given Hungary’s sorry state five years ago, different paths would have not led to 5-6 million living in poverty? For instance, if you understand basic economics, then you would understand that if Hungary would today still have the fx load it had five years ago, right now interest rates would be going up, because of the US federal reserve raising rates, which is causing many developing world countries runs on their currencies. If Hungary would be raising rates right now in order to defend the forint, it would strangle the recovery. But because the fx loans were converted and government fx was reduced from 50% of debt, to 30%, Hungary is no longer vulnerable to speculator attacks on its bonds and currency. And when the next recession arrives Hungary will be able to enter it with low rates, which should help make the next recession more shallow. Not to mention that 2% deficits will allow it to avoid deep austerity measures. We can similarly go back to… Read more »
Guest

You explain it so nicely …
Now would you please explain the real reason for the tobacco shop monopoly – and why most of them now belong to relatives of Fidesz politicians?

Zoli
Guest

I can explain to you the fact that the left has been going at such relatively petty issues for five years, and it did not work. It will not work as long as Fidesz makes the right call on the big important subjects, such as I pointed out. Stadiums and Orban’s son in law and his pet pig are really not an argument, when most Hungarians see that given the stated policies of the left, they are much better off with the outcomes of Orban’s policies.

Guest
@Zoli Today 10:37 am You certainly mount very convincing arguments here and I freely admit that you might well be right re the points you raised above. Which means that in these respects I was wrong. So, it turns out that the unorthodox economic policies of Fidesz might not have been so unorthodox after all, just smart. one cannot argue against hard facts, and in regard to the points you raise, Fidesz absolutely does seem to have made the right calls, and good for them. As to the unacceptable poverty levels in Hungary, I know that Fidesz inherited a mess, which however they were active contributors to, both in opposition and government for the past 25 years. The root causes of the poverty problem go back to the very nature of the regime change 25 years ago and the wrong economic and social policy choices made at the time and in the early nineties. Together with the pathetic and catastrophically underfunded old Prussian-style education system, plus the all-pervasive corruption and regulatory mess at all levels of government. And then there is the pervasive fear and contempt of failure, instead of looking at failure as a valuable learning experience on the… Read more »
Guest

Continuing Bálint above (Today 1:38 pm)

Perhaps not so strange, after all, because a genuine people’s capitalism in prudently regulated markets has no tradition whatsoever in Hungary, where notions of so-called capitalism seem to equal either corrupt crony capitalism or unbridled robber capitalism.

spectator
Guest

“There are plenty of examples in economic matters, such as the IMF, FX debt and so on..”

Would you mind to tell me just how are we supposed to call the €12.5bn loan from Russia then?
Or — strictly for fun — how the interest-rate compares to the same loan from the IMF?
The only positive thing about that deal that Orbán would be long gone when the true matters hit the proverbial fan, and even those die hard supporers as yourself will realise, just how professionally they had been taken by the aforementioned conman.

At least even your grandchildren will learn and remember his name, due to their still unpaid debt to the Russians…

Zoli
Guest

The good thing about that deal is that with a self-financed deal, the project is likely to go ahead, unless the EU, in its infinite “wisdom” will obstruct it, as it did with South Stream. There are in fact examples of similar nuclear projects falling apart in the region, due to financing issues in the past few years.

As for the project itself, given EU and German policies, Hungary may need that deal more than most realize. South Stream was blocked while it seems Nord Stream is a go. In these circumstances, Hungary may end up losing gas imports from Russia by 2020 or soon after, as almost 100% of Russian exports to EU will go to Germany.. Nuclear power can be a great substitute if that is the case. Otherwise, a decade from now, Hungary may find itself dependent on very expensive LNG imports, and wind & solar, which the fact that governments constantly have to subsidize, speaks volumes about what it will do to Hungary’s economic competitiveness.

spectator
Guest
Thank you for the insight! Rather pity though that you didn’t answer to my questions, but honestly, I can’t blame you. Anyhow, I would recommend to you to consider the timespan, the cost, — and I didn’t mention the ROI — and most of all the development in- and around the energy sector. Technology advancing exponentially, and we are talking about twenty to fifty years into the future in this case, even more. Just remember the price and capacity of personal computers and/or cellular phones, say 25 years back in time, and compare with the present. Just a hint: I spent well over fifty grand on my first real graphic workstation, – today my telephone have more computing power! My gadgets at home today well surpassing a smaller town from that era, and we’re still talking about period of time what we can easily grasp. Investing heavily in obsolete technologies at time when no such investment really necessary yet, with terms which clearly advantageous only to the Russians — well, not you, not me, not the Hungarian population privy to the details — is a grave error. And I was mildly civil… And, if we are at it, why don’t… Read more »
Zoli
Guest
OK!!! I see that you are one of those believers in eternal progress, no limits to human ingenuity and all that stuff. May I just point out to you that at this time 93% of global electricity is produced from coal, hydro, gas, oil, and nuclear. The other 7% includes the renewable resources that you obviously believe is the wave of the future. But fact is that 25 years ago, which is when you spent 50k on your graphic workstation, the situation was not much different. And fifty years from now it will not be all that different either. Perhaps that 7% will become 20%, but that is about it. The reason is because whenever you install solar or wind capacity, you also have to make sure that you have backup capacity from a more reliable source. After all, we cannot be left in the dark whenever wind does not blow or sun does not shine. Or you think that Hungary can tell Daimler that they need to stop production because the wind did not blow enough? For a clue about the real future, take a look at Germany. it produces about 15% energy from renewables. But that is from… Read more »
webber
Guest

“For a clue about the real future, take a look at Germany”
where the government has stopped further development of nuclear, and is piling funding into renewables.
Indeed, “Net-generation from renewable energy sources in the German electricity sector has increased from 6.3% in 2000 to about 30% in 2014.”
So, the most developed economy in Europe, one of the most developed in the world, is turning to renewables.
Isn’t that the point you wanted to make, Zoli?
Where do you get your energy stats? ГУМ?

Zoli
Guest

I believe that the 30% number includes hydro.

Aside from that, you should know that it took electricity prices that are second-highest in Europe to make that investment possible. It is about 250% higher than in Hungary. The German economy copes with the higher prices thanks to the Euro currency, which is dragged down by the likes of Greece and Italy, making German industry still viable, despite the high energy costs. Can’t really see any country which has a harder time competing in industry being able to do the same as Germany is doing.

You should also know that Germany already has issues with generation fluctuations, despite the fact that wind and solar only make up a small percentage of generation.

Germany is responding by cutting solar power subsidies, which in effect means that they are coming to terms with reality, namely that they are approaching the maximum viable solar & wind capacity.

Here is something that might shed some light for you. It includes many of the facts I pointed to.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-18/germany-struggles-too-much-renewable-energy

I have nothing against wind & solar. But we need to be realistic in regards to its limits.

webber
Guest

You should know that you are a poor propagandist.

Guest

Yes, it’s easy to see – all our new trolls give breitbart or zerohedge or infowars as “sources” – that immediately disqualifies them!
Lunatics!

Guest

The Orbán government can not, in my mind, be regarded as conservative. It is a radical, populist regime that overturned the existing order and replaced it was something quite new – an illiberal democracy. True conservatism places value of things as they are and makes changes slowly and carefully because it recognises the danger of too rapid change, and extremism. These can lead all to easily to instability and disorder and the subsequent loss of individual liberty and the rule of law – all of which are anathema to real conservatives.

I wouldn\’t even say the regime is socially conservative, but is socially reactionary and seeks to take Hungary back the social and moral norms of a 100 years ago.

So it is no surprise that real conservatives should be aghast at what is happening in Hungary today.

Istvan
Guest

Waitzen I agree with you, the Orban/Fidesz government is not conservative, it very populist with a corporatist economic perspective. But I would suspect there is no real social base for a conservative movement in Hungary so they likely pose no threat to Fidesz and can have all the meetings they like.

Guest

I disagree István, I think that it is within the old Fidesz party itself, that figures will rise and eventually topple Orbán. Thank you Éva for posting an article which at last gives some hope for the future of Hungary.
But depressing that it has taken this long for the moderates within Fidesz to come to their senses.

Guest

@time4change
Today 3:27 am

Given what I am familiar with among Hungarians, this is pure wishful thinking.

But good luck with it, I suppose wishful thinking is better than nothing. . . .

For, hope springs eternal. . . .

Guest

I think you make a very important point here, Waitzen.

The careless use of titles and adjectives such as \”conservative\” can mislead and in fact contribute to the manipulation of less informed people in the Hungarian countryside, who as a result have not got any idea what is really going on.

For instance using the emotive \”communist\” has been enough to make the uninformed vote for Fidesz, mistakenly thinking it means a vote against the old regime, not realising that many of the things which were intolerable under Russian rule, are being enacted now, just under a different name.

Guest

@time4change
Today 3:22 am

Genuine classical liberalism or, if you will, liberal conservatism died a very rude and sudden death in Hungary upon the loss of WW1.

After that what remained was irredentist nationalism spiced up with violent doses of antisemitism, semi-feudal conservatism spiced up with genteel antisemitism, a small social democratic opposition spiced up with working class antisemitism,and a small hard core of communist subversives who were mostly vicious antisemites whether Jewish or not.

Charming, simply charming, ain’t it . . . . . .

Member

Eva – A small correction:

Peter Akos Bod was never a candidate for prime minister. What happened was, just after Fidesz lost the first round of the 2006 election, Orban wanted to find a way to blame the MDF for his impending defeat. He removed himself as candidate for prime minister and begged the MDF to throw its support behind his party in the second round. In return, Orban said he would allow the MDF to name the prime ministerial candidate. He suggested Bod.

MDF President Ibolya David immediately rejected the idea. She knew Orban was up to no good, especially since her support could hardly have helped Fidesz defeat Gyurcsany — the MDF did not have a single candidate standing in the second round.

However, Orban’s gambit seemed to have worked in terms of PR: To this very day, Fideszers blame the MDF for denying them victory in 2006.

http://hvg.hu/velemeny/20110113_gazdasag_munkaero_innovacio

Guest

London Calling!

I suspect these ‘conferences’ try and analyse at the expense of involved political debate. And they have good speakers – but academics can reach out to many international bodies to understand that their county is slipping into the abyss.

Most of these academics – just like the teachers and nurses – are from the constituency of core Fidesz voters and are realising that they must start to criticise the system in the guise of analysis.

No one has the courage – or conviction – yet – to bell the cat.

Eva characterises such dialogue as: “Orbán system or Orbán regime: Debate on the nature of the Hungarian government.”!

What does it matter? It’s academic!

I will only register its significance when they say ” Orban stay or Orban go: Debate on how to get rid of the Orban regime and stop the corruption. ”

In essence – a talking shop.

The time has come for action not words – but I suppose if academics are being more critical in their ‘analysis’ then it’s a start.

But a mighty slow one – only slightly faster than the dilatory EU.

Regards

Charlie

Guest

I wonder what is the significance of the meeting taking place in the Loyola Cafe. (see photo)

http://www.jezsuita.hu/taxonomy/term/108

Guest

Are they thinking about reintroducing the inquisition in Hungary?
Sorry, but that joke just had to be …

And now for something even more OT and on the other side of the “Belief Spectrum”:

There is a transhumanist candidate for the US presidency whose name sounds rather Hungarian:
Has anybody heard about Zoltan Istvan?
http://www.zoltanistvan.com/

Guest

wolfi: “And now for something even more OT…”
My question is not an inch OT. A possible sponsorship by the jesuits would be very interesting if the group is genuinely critical of Fidesz/Orban.

Guest

Jean?

I think Wolfi was referring to himself after his inquisition idea.

(I think the Jesuits are the super-charged conviction Catholics – who probably drove through the Sunday trading laws via the KDNP faction of Fidesz – to keep the Roman Catholic Unchristian Church onside.)

spectator
Guest

Wolfi, did you check this link too?

http://www.immortalitybus.com

Seems like the guy planning to stay awhile!
At the main time driving this thing. Seriously!

comment image

Guest

Yes, transhumanism will make you live forever (in a way) – if it ever happens.

Guest

It’s the Roman Catholic Unchristian Church (the Jesuits) during their coffee break.

Or Fidesz at prayer – having coffee and scones.

Guest

Catholics. The message being “Jews and other liberals keep out!”

Latefor
Guest

Is that so?
“Catholics. The message being “Jews and other liberals keep out!”

Just for your information: Not long ago, the Pope invited Naomi Klein and Christine Lagarde to the Vatican. I have the feeling that he’ll be visiting Milton Friedman’s grave soon.
As you can see, the Catholics have no issues with Jews and Liberals. The problem is the hardcore atheists, who cannot tolerate the Catholic Church.

petofi
Guest

My god, Latefor, you’ve come out of your cocoon…but you’re still a caterpillar!

Latefor
Guest

Thanks for the welcoming! Let’s just say: I’m a butterfly in the making. 🙂

petofi
Guest

@Latefor

You’re such a genius!

re Vatican & jews….Pray tell, who do you think helped all those nazis escape to South America after world war II?

Latefor
Guest

@petofi – that was 70 years ago! This is NOW!

petofi
Guest

@latefor–what we were/what we are/and what we become…are intricately connected.
Only Hungarians who have committed unpardonable sins–robbing the wealth of jews who were sent to the gas chambers, for instance– would ever attempt to
erase the past-

Guest

Latefor: “As you can see, the Catholics have no issues with Jews and Liberals.”

Right now they focus on the Pope as you do. He is in bad standing.

Latefor
Guest

@Jean P – Why is he in bad standing?

Guest

He has broken some rules that the Vatican has in common with Hells Angels.

Latefor
Guest

Is the Pope CONSERVATIVE or NEO-LIBERAL or neither? It’s hard to tell. I was so happy seeing him with Naomi Klein (I happened to believe that she’s an angel!)

Latefor
Guest

. . . and NOT from Hell! She is from HEAVEN, God bless her!.

musiclover
Guest

Bod, Mellar and Solyom have been voicing their disapproval for the last five years, in case you hadn’t noticed.

Guest

The situation in Hungary looks like a slow motion disaster that will sooner or later go nuclear.

As the saying goes: “God’s mills grind slowly but surely.”

Defying the inexorable economic laws of gravity is a fool’s errand in the best of times, and Hungary is very far from experiencing the best of times.

Then there is the law of unintended consequences with which reality inevitably sooner or later whacks the heads of those intent on defying it very, very hard.

The only thing is that knowing Hungarians, I am not at all sure that what would come after the Orbán mafia would be or could be any better, given the mentality, cultural proclivities and political comfort zones of Hungarians.

Árpád Szöczi
Guest

Please keep in mind that almost all the problems you list were very much alive and kicking during the Socialists reign which for many more was disastrous. What I am reading from you smacks of “agenda” and selective memory.

Guest

I am never clear what people mean when they refer to the Socialist reign?

So many in Hungary refer to Russia\’s domination as socialist, when in fact it was an extrememly corrupt Communist regime, benefitting the elite rulers and their cronies, just like today\’s Hungary under Orbán regardless of what he, an ex-communist, wants to call his political party.

Britan, even under a conservative Tory govenment is a genuine socialist country, whatever its shortcomings and imperfections, which is why so many flock to it and benefit from all the \”benefits\”.

Hungary has never, to my knowledge, been a proper socialist country.
Gyurcsány\’s government inherited the long traditonof corruption, which he strove to erradicate and which is why he was ousted by his own corrupt peers.

But even then it was \”corrupt light\” compared to what is happening now under the ruthless Orbán and Mafia, inc., who have fingers in every lucrative pie in the land, and who covertly encourage death threats to those who are consistently vociferous in their condemnation of the mafia rulers.

Member

Speaking of corruption: according to hvg.hu ( http://hvg.hu/gazdasag/201604_nyomozas_unios_penzek_miatt_csalas_a_csucso ) the European Anti-Fraud office OLAF suspects Hungarian anti-corruption officials of stealing EU subsidies which were meant for funding anti-corruption measures. This piece of news was promptly reposted by the satirical “news” site Hírcsárda on its FB page…

Guest

HaHaHa!!

Big fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite ’em
Little fleas have littler fleas…
And so ad infinitum!

Hungary – corruptly corrupted corruption.

Corruption central.

One can only hope for ejection soon.

Guest
Love Mr. Szepesi’s comment of ‘blind men fixing a watch with a hammer’. A powerful indictment of the current workmen in government allegedly serving their body politic. They rather look to be not servants of the public good but rather takers and hangers on in their tribal society with its political customs, mores and ‘culture’ driving behavior. This is a government that does not appear to entertain ‘dialog’ and the resulting ‘give and take’ to develop insights into the great problems the country is facing. The ‘conservatives’ have a difficult job under the circumstances. Interesting as to why the government spends so much energy , time and intensive detail on ‘amendments’ regarding ’emergencies’ relative to the state (with all its foreboding) and but yet cannot spread a bit of that aggressive energy in arguably tackling the grave problems in education and health care affecting the population. So from that it looks to be a matter of priorities on the government agenda. And number one looks to be an authoritarian state with a religious backbone and providing individual liberties but yet with a bit of a pull on the leash. All in all Orban is definitely following the Putinian script for… Read more »
Observer
Guest

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