Neo-Nazis remember the “Day of Honor,” but why in Székesfehérvár?

The city of Székesfehérvár is in the news again. On Saturday, February 6, a few hundred neo-Nazis gathered at the Magyar Király (Hungarian King) Hotel, marched along Fő utca (Main Street), and ended their demonstration at the Church of Saint Stephen, one of the most important landmarks of the city. It is the oldest Christian church in Hungary, established in the 970s by Prince Géza, father of Saint Stephen, who was most likely crowned in this church in the year 1000.

I’m not going to waste much time on the demonstration itself. It was organized by the far-right Nazi groups we encounter most often: the Outlaws, the New Hungarian Guard, and the Youth Movement of Sixty-four Counties. The occasion for this memorial walk was the 71st anniversary of the breakout of German and Hungarian soldiers from Budapest, which had been surrounded by Soviet troops on December 24, 1944. Although Hitler specifically forbade his troops to try to escape from the city, on February 11 they decided to engage the Soviets. Of about 40,000 men only 500 managed to escape. The casualties were enormous. For details, I recommend Krisztián Ungváry’s The Siege of Budapest: One Hundred Days in World War II (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006). People who sympathize with the Nazi ideology call this event “Tag der Ehre” or “Day of Honor,” and for a number of years far-right groups, including Jobbik, organized events around this time of the year. Many make a pilgrimage, a walking tour of sixty kilometers, retracing the steps of the soldiers who took part in the escape.

In the past Jobbik took part in these memorial events, and last year at a similar gathering Előd Novák, one of the most radical members of the Jobbik leadership, delivered a speech. This year, however, he changed his mind at the last minute. The reason for his decision may have been that one of the scheduled speakers was a former member of the Waffen SS. Although at the end the German visitor didn’t show, the leaders of the Hungarian neo-Nazi groups made up for his absence, delivering full-fledged Nazi speeches. One claimed that with the destruction of the Third Reich “darkness fell on Europe.” Another ended his speech with “Glory to Waffen SS!” and “Glory to Szálasi!”

These kinds of far-right groups can be found everywhere in the world, and they usually don’t pose a great danger for society as long as they aren’t protected (beyond their basic human rights) by the government. What worries me in this case are the following:

(1) Why did these groups select Székesfehérvár as their gathering place, far away from the event that took place in February 1945? Could it have something to do with the controversy over the erection of a statue of Bálint Hóman, minister of education and culture between 1932 and 1942, also in Székesfehérvár? Did these extremist groups think that the Fidesz leadership of the city that for months had defended its decision to go ahead with the project of memorializing a rabidly anti-Semitic minister who had a hand in the Horthy regime’s anti-Jewish laws would protect them and thus their demonstration would proceed undisturbed?

(2) Why did Imre Horváth, the parish priest of the Church of St. Stephen, agree to offer a mass for these Waffen SS soldiers and their Hungarian companions? I assume that for a certain amount of money anyone can order a mass for a person or a group. One of the Budapest Catholic churches offers a mass for Viktor Orbán every year, for example. But the conversation between Imre Horváth and the journalist of The Budapest Beacon aroused my suspicion. Horváth was outright antagonistic, making it clear that neither the journalist’s nor anyone else’s opinion interested him. He added: “I’m a Hungarian, a veteran, who served his country.” Horváth is 86 years old and so most likely served his country during the Rákosi period, but I guess for a nationalist it doesn’t matter that this military service was to the Stalinist People’s Republic of Hungary. His brusque manner—he eventually hung up the telephone—may well have reflected his sympathetic feelings toward these far-right groups.

But let’s return briefly to the Hóman controversy. Since we last discussed the topic two new items of interest have become public. One was something that certainly didn’t please the Orbán government. On January 27 President Barack Obama delivered a speech at a ceremony in the Israeli Embassy in Washington, marking the International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Obama emphasized that he has made fighting global anti-Semitism a priority, and in this context he brought up Hungary as a case where the United States took a stand. “It’s why, when a statue of an anti-Semitic leader from World War II was planned in Hungary, we led the charge to convince their government to reverse course,” Obama said. “This was not a side note to our relations with Hungary, this was central to maintaining a good relationship with the United States, and we let them know.”

Of course, to those who followed the Hóman affair closely this didn’t come as a surprise. Readers of Hungarian Spectrum knew about the pressure that was put on the Orbán government when three high-ranking U.S. diplomats descended on Budapest and conducted negotiations with members of the Hungarian government. However reluctantly, Viktor Orbán eventually announced that the planned statue would not be erected in Székesfehérvár because in his opinion no public figure who collaborated with the German occupiers after March 19, 1944 can possibly have a statue in a public place or a street named after him. Without U.S. pressure the Hóman statue would undoubtedly be standing in its designated place today. But, of course, the revelation by the U.S. president was embarrassing, and the Orbán government immediately denied it. In fact, the spokesman of Viktor Orbán said, the American pressure was counterproductive. The Americans would have fared better if they had remained quiet. This is just another of the brazen lies the Orbán government specializes in.

The idea for a statue of Bálint Hóman, as I pointed out earlier, did not originate with the local Bálint Hóman Society. I called attention to a speech that Orbán delivered in Székesfehérvár in May, shortly after the legal rehabilitation of  Hóman. Since then, however, we have learned that Viktor Orbán’s involvement in the Hóman case goes back even further. The man who is behind the effort to whitewash Hóman’s career is István Varga, a lawyer. After Fidesz won the election in 2010 and the party had a two-thirds majority in parliament, Varga, who was a Fidesz MP at the time, wanted to call attention to Bálint Hóman’s rehabilitation in an interpellation. Tibor Navracsics, today European commissioner of education and sports, was the leader of the Fidesz delegation at the time. He chose to ignore Varga’s suggestion, most likely because he knew that the issue was a hot potato. Varga, who had been trying to get “justice” for Hóman in the previous twenty years, was devastated. At a subsequent delegation meeting, where Orbán was also present, he brought up the topic again. The idea appealed to Viktor Orbán, who told him: “Go ahead!” So, Orbán was behind both the legal rehabilitation of Bálint Hóman and the erection of the statue honoring him. Since he is the prime minister of the country, one must conclude that the Hungarian government itself supports the veneration of politicians who had a hand in the anti-Jewish laws that eventually led to the Hungarian Holocaust. I know this is a serious charge, but the facts that have emerged of late point to this conclusion.

And now let’s go back for a moment to András Cser-Palkovics, mayor of Székesfehérvár. He started his political career in Fidelitas, Fidesz’s youth movement, where for eight years he was the organization’s chairman. From 2002 on he was a Fidesz member of the Székesfehérvár city council. He was a Fidesz member of parliament between 2002 and 2014 and has been mayor of Székesfehérvár since 2010. At one point he was even the spokesman of the party. So, he is Fidesz through and through.

How did he react to the news that neo-Nazi groups were planning a demonstration in the city? He asked people not to attend the rally, adding that legally he has no right to forbid it from taking place. But then he added: “At the end of last year I asked all people to safeguard the peace in our city. Then people on the left were the ones who imported tension and conflict from Budapest. Now it is the far right that is planning to do the same thing over a historical event that has nothing to do with Székesfehérvár.” This is an incredible statement. Can the people who gathered to protest the erection of the Hóman statue be compared to the neo-Nazis who gathered two days ago to praise Szálasi and the Waffen SS? Yes, according to Cser-Palkovics, one of important members of Fidesz.

There is no question in my mind that the Orbán government’s views on anti-Semitism and the Holocaust are two-faced and insincere. Just as Mark Weitzman of the Wiesenthal Center remarked, the Hungarian authorities’ failure to condemn the event, considering that Hungary is currently chairing the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, was “an exercise in political and historical hypocrisy.” It is hard not to agree with him.

February 8, 2016
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György Lázár
Guest

I think the key to this puzzle is András Cser-Palkovics, mayor of Székesfehérvár. In 2010 he got elected as a Fidesz-Jobbik candidate, MSZP even accused him to be a member of Jobbik. He is a trusted veteran who is respected by the Hungarian far-right. This rally was a political payback to prove that he (even in Fidesz colors) can take care of his neo-Nazi pals….

Reality Check
Guest
gdfxx
Guest

The fact that there are neo-Nazis in Hungary did not surprise me. Neither did the fact that they marched and that they organized memorial activities for the Waffen SS.

But their printed program described a mass at the basilica in Szekesfehervar. A mass to be held by a priest of the Roman Catholic Church, a church known about its centralized management. This I could not understand. Posting the websites above is a good idea, those of us who would like an explanation, can ask there.

petofi
Guest

Anyone remotely interested in understanding Hungary should visit the films of Kusturica…and realize that the country is run by exactly such characters-

Guest

Simple.

The Roman Catholic Unchristian Church

Guest

The march perfectly illustrates how the far-right have taken over Hungarian history for their own ends. The breakout was indeed an tragedy and Ungváry’s account is masterful and compelling. I was unaware of this event until I read his book and when I next visited Budapest I paid a special visit to those streets where this terrible event took place. It is an event that should be commemorated because of all those that died there.

Instead the far-right uses this tragedy to celebrate and promote fascism. It is appalling that in modern-day Europe such blatant neo-nazism can be on public display, let alone with active support of local government and church officials. The lack of condemnation by national politicians and leaders is even more appalling.

And so the breakout, which could be the opportunity to remember the suffering war brings and to recommit to the idea that Europe should never again experience such a terrible thing, is instead being used by the most vile of political low-life with its toxic form of Hungarian nationalism.

Guest

@waitzen
February 8, 2016 10:46 pm

— “It is an event that should be commemorated because of all those that died there.” —

Commemorate Nazi fanatics who blew up the bridges across the Danube and caused the utter destruction and leveling of Budapest whilst encouraging and facilitating the murder of thousands of Jewish women, children, men and old people by Hungarian Nazis, who shot them wholesale into the Danube and merrily played target shooting on Jewish babies?

Gimme a break.

On your logic we should maybe start commemorating the poor unfortunate Hutu, Khmer Rouge or Islamic State mass murderers too.

Guest

By the way, I was two and a half years old sitting in a walking pram, out for a walk with my nanny on Szent István körút, when I saw Margit híd (Margaret Bridge) blown up, and a mess of cars, trams and people first fly into the air, then plunge into the Danube.

That day they Nazis in Budapest blown up all the other bridges too over the Danube.

After that day, there were no more bridges over the Danube for the Hungarian Nazis to amuse themselves with target shooting practice on Jewish babies thrown off the Danube bridges – much to their regret, I suppose.

Anyway, that picture of Margit híd blowing up is forever etched in my mind, indelible to this day, and I am almost 74 years old now..

I am not a forgiving kind, and find the proposition that the Nazis who did that to Budapest should be “commemorated” to be utterly disgusting and despicable.

Guest

Mike, you’re totally right!

Btw Hitler had given the order everywhere to destroy everything and threatened that any officer not obliging to this would be shot.

But there were several who refused to obey – like the commanding German officer in Paris (forgot his name). Can you imagine how Paris would look today if they had followed the crazy Führer’s commands – no Eiffel tower, the Louvre destroyed etc …

There also was a fascinating report some time ago on all the famous pictures stolen from the Nazis in museums all over Europe and brought to a salt mine near Salzburg. When the order came to destroy everything some courageous miners collapsed a wall with dynamite (or whatever they use) so the treasures were hidden from access.

Later they showed US soldiers the way …

Guest

@wolfi7777
Today 11:35 am

By the way, wolfi7777, I would like to make it unequivocally clear that I have no problem whatsoever with the average German of today.

The vast majority of the German people, particularly the West Germans, mentally have been very successfully in mentally leaving behind a horrific past and long ago faced up to the delicate and exceedingly difficult test of truth and reconciliation with the Jewish people.

And they passed that test with flying colours.

Not so the Hungarians, the erstwhile most trusted allies of the Nazis.

Thus my ire is directed solely at Hungarians, the majority of whom appear to be mentally locked into a disgusting 1930s time warp.

As to the Germans of today, I worked for a very large German firm near Hanover in the 1980s, made some wonderful friends over there, and I am in awe of classical German culture, whether it be music, literature, philosophy or science.

Guest

Correction: please disregard the first instance of “mentally” above. Unfortunately I have no access to the edit function.

Guest

Further correction: In the second para above, “successfully” should be just “successful.” Apologies.

Guest

I also have a great affinity for German precision, punctuality, reliability and trustworthiness, the architecture, cleanliness, orderliness and cozy feeling about small towns and villages in the countryside, and above all, I just love traditional German food.

Now you have it. :-))

Guest

Especially when accompanied by traditional German songs and music in small, gemütlich eating places in the towns and villages of Southern Bavaria.

:-)))

Guest

Re: ‘But there were several who refused to obey – like the commanding German officer in Paris (forgot his name)’

I believe that was von Cholitz. And I know there is a film titled ‘Diplomacy’ (released in 2014) which explores that situation. Supposedly it was done well …trying to get it.

Guest

Speaking of \’pilgrimages\’, just wondering if the neo-Nazi extracurricular activity committee has the group starting out one of these days by bus or walking with drums banging from Szekesfehervar taking 81 west toward Austria.

Supposedly \’quiet\’ there now in Branau am Inn considering its history. But in 5 hours it\’s just probably one of the best places for Jobbik types to let everybody know how they think and perhaps \’where they\’re at\’. On the other hand some residents won\’t name the city of Hitler\’s birth.\’Downriver from Salzburg\’ was more like it.

LwiiH
Guest

The information tablets at the citadel describes the breakout as the Germans being pushed out by the Soviets and Hungarians. The Hungarian tablet states the same thing.

Andrew J Chandler
Guest

Surely all those who remained in government after 19 March, 1944, were collaborators, from Horthy downwards, at least until the ousting of the Regency in October that year. Additionally, Hóman was responsible for the renewal of anti-Semitic Laws from 1938, including Jewish registration, which enabled the SS and the Hungarian Gendarmerie to ghettoise and deport the ‘Jewish’ population of provincial Hungary so rapidly.

Steve 386
Guest

It is quite natural for the majority of Hungarians to hate somebody. Thus we should not find it surprising that they hate Jews and any other minorities. They cannot these days do very many nasties, but at least they can march around and wear stupid uniforms to show that they are determined to keep up their old habits.

Guest

Remember how in those Tarki surveys they used to hate the Píréz?
has anyone seen newer ones – or have Hungarians at least woken up to the idea that this was a joke/fake?

Tyrker
Guest

But it’s not the “majority of Hungarians” who march around wearing stupid uniforms – it’s only a few right-wing extremists.

Observer
Guest

But IT IS the majority of Hungarians who voted for Fidesz and Jobbik. Now Jobbik is involved in most of the neo-fascist events and Fidesz is sponsoring and protecting them.
Sadly, the Hungarians, except for those who did vote for other parties, are to various degrees responsible for these outrages.

Reality Check
Guest

Almost 50% did not vote for either party. They either did not vote (nearly 40%) or voted for some other party ( a bit greater than 10%).

Let’s keep things in perspective for all those Hungarians who want something better, even if they are not quite sure what.

tappanch
Guest

The news editor of TV2, the second most popular television channel will be a Fidesz propagandist and tabloid editor.

The channel was recently purchased by Fidesz using state funds.

(to be precise: taxpayers’ money —-> state-owned bank —-> Vajna, Orban-appointed casino & gambling duopolist —-> TV2 )

http://index.hu/kultur/media/2016/02/09/a_story_foszerkesztoje_lesz_a_tv2_hirigazgatoja/

tappanch
Guest

The Fine Arts Museum, a public institution, lent several valuable ($1 million) paintings to Orban’s advisor Habony’s private apartment via one of the new managers of TV2.

After several years of law suits, the Museum had to hand over this piece of information to portal “atlatszo.hu”.

http://atlatszo.hu/2016/02/09/a-szepmuveszeti-muzeum-tiz-ertekes-antik-festmenyt-kolcsonzott-ki-a-szerb-utca-9-be/

Observer
Guest

They consider the whole country as their domain/latifundium. In this scope of things what’s a couple of museum treasures for Habony, or a lavish London weekend for Lázár on the dupes’ expense.
E.g. Hermann Göring also “borrowed” and kept a lot of museum pictures in his residencies.

Guest

Surprise, surprise!

I am shocked, shocked!

The American Indian used to say that the white man speaks with forked tongue.

Orbán and Fidesz do better than that: they say one thing from one corner of their mouth, the exact opposite from the other, and then do some foul, sneaky thing as the third act.

Quite an act to pull off, I must say.

After all, “Hungary performs better” . . . .

Guest
London Calling! What is amazing is how Bálint Hóman was ‘rehabilitated’ by Orban in 2015 – because there was insufficient evidence! Why would you churn up old wounds unless you wanted to rewrite history for an ulterior motive? Insufficient evidence after all these years! But they only had to get rid of any that didn’t support this move – a cynical ploy probably to shut up the Americans so they could erect the statue. Hardly subtle – but Hungarians don’t do subtle. Of course if it was necessary to rehabilitate Bálint Hóman for natural justice reasons it would have been done years before. We know how safe ‘evidence’ is in Orban’s hands. He planted his mate Simicska (later to fall out of course) in the tax office to shred all incriminating documents that were testament to their wrongdoings. ‘Rehabilitated by Orban’ you say Charlie? Yes. One of the disadvantages of having the legislature in the palm of your hands is that you can’t distance yourself from the decisions. Orban decided – his nepotistic flunkys obliged. It would be such an easy step to ‘rehabilitate’ Hitler. There’s no evidence in Hungary that he was guilty under the same principle (or get… Read more »
Observer
Guest

They are not so subtle, but, yes they would have done more, but they are opressed by the “opinion terror” of the liberal/left media and elites of Europe.

These are the little symptoms revealing the “fascist light” nature of the Orban regime.

Guest

I know education has been a topic of discussion recently. I will give an \’A plus plus plus to the Hungarian way of the 3 \’R\’s. It used to be in English parlance \’ reading, writing and arithmetic\’. But it appears now in the apparent attitudes toward history it is \’reformulation, revision and rehabilitation\’. The scribblers with pen and \’truth-tellers\’ with mouths are very hard at work. It is the zeitgeist of Central Europe today.

Guest
@wrfree Today 8:25 am If you understand Hungarian, I would add the following three to your trifecta: maszatolás, szerecsenmosdatás and arcátlan hazudozás, which in English translates as fudging/obfuscation, whitewashing and barefaced lying/prevarication, though in Hungarian all three terms sound a lot more hard-hitting. The Veritas [Truth sic.] Institute for Historical Research established by Fidesz is tasked precisely with this mission, including the thorough whitewashing of Hungary and Hungarians of any guilt over the Hungarian Holocaust and in particular the events of 1944/45; the systematic restoration of the “reputation” and works of the most bloodthirsty antisemites of the prewar and wartime periods; and in general the restoration of the reputation of the entire semi-feudal Horthy era with its aristocracy and declassé gentry, hereditary landowners of enormous tracts of croplands, vicious antisemitism, virulent irredentism, a lunatic media and politicians continually inciting and brainwashing the great unwashed against the Jews and Trianon, an omnipresent oppressive gendarmerie (political police, or csendőrség in Hungarian), and three million destitute beggars living in unimaginable poverty among a population of around nine million. If I was a Hungarian, I would look upon that era with horror, regret and enormous shame, rather than with Christian Nationalist or National Socialist… Read more »
Guest

Mike, this longing for “the good old times” of feudalism is also something which I don’t understand and which you don’t find in other countries.
OK, many Bavarians still adore their crazy king Ludwig 2, who built those fabulous castles, almost ruining the state – but now tourism profits …
But no German wants a return to the aristocracy of the 19th century!

And now something totally OT but interesting – the health system. A comparison of the European systems just appeared:
2015 Euro Health Consumer Index (EHCI)

Hungary’s health care system comes in place 27 – just above Greece (which btw has many, many doctors, but …)
It is remarkable for a country, which has had a public healthcare service for as long as the United Kingdom, to still be in a rather poor position on Patients Rights and Information, Accessibility and Outcomes.

http://www.healthpowerhouse.com/files/EHCI_2015/EHCI_2015_report.pdf

Guest
Re: \’If you understand Hungarian, I would add the following three to your trifecta: maszatolás, szerecsenmosdatás and arcátlan hazudozás, which in English translates as fudging/obfuscation, whitewashing and barefaced lying/prevarication, though in Hungarian all three terms sound a lot more hard-hitting\’ Thank you for helping to add to my vocabulary. You are very precise in your choice of words. As it should be to specifically describe how the population is being \’hood-winked\’ and sucked into a political and cultural maelstrom. I find that this playing around with history shows indeed how the government\’s \’impreciseness\’ in presenting and interpreting the country\’s difficult past has led it into a stinking mendaciousness that is despicable. And this lies with both individuals and institutions. Hungary truly is morally drift and there is no one to save her. It is a world turned upside down. In the 20th it is obvious the country was turned every which way and hard pressed with some bad infections. Like chicken pox in older populations, Hungary seems to harbor the \’leftovers\’ in its politics as it practices a certain sublimation\’. As ancient Rome had its \’bread and circuses\’ to fete and control the population Hungary has its parties do the… Read more »
Guest
@wolfi7777 Today 11:12 am Actually it is fairly straightforward to understand this Hungarian longing for the “good old times” of feudalism. In reality it is a longing for the glory days of the half century before WW1, when the aristocratic leadership of the then Kingdom of Hungary was able to leverage a dominant political position for Hungary in what became the Dual Monarchy subsequent to the Habsburg loss of the war against Prussia in 1866. However, Hungarians find it extremely “inconvenient” that the Kingdom of Hungary was in fact a multi-language, multi-nationality/multi-ethnic and powerfully feudalist political entity in which native speakers of Hungarian were a minority and Jews the engine of progress (by invitation of the then Hungarian aristocratic political leadership). So Hungarians today bashfully avert their eyes from (the to them) these inconvenient facts, and obsess instead about the interwar period and the WW2, when at last they became a majority in the country (and never mind that almost 100% of them had ethnically non-Hungarian forebears), and above all, because then at last they were able to well and truly give it in the neck to Jews living in Hungary (who in turn were living under the common Hungarian… Read more »
Guest

The three ‘r’s’ are reading riting and rithmetic.

tappanch
Guest

There are two teachers’ union – PSz & PDSz.

Usually PDSz is less docile than PSz. But this time, it was PDSz that accepted the government’s invitation, and PSz did not. The leader of the PDSz was satisfied very much on radio after the meeting today, having received some promises from the government ahead of the planned teacher’s demonstration on February 13.

Divide et impera ! Homines avari sunt stultique.

petofi
Guest

@ tappanch

“Usually PDSz is less docile than PSz. But this time, it was PDSz that accepted the government’s invitation…”

The way of the Hungarian world…it’s all a question of who ‘get’s there first’–that is to say, who offers up his service for a fee.

Hungaricum.

Hajra Magyarok

Istvan
Guest
I hereby join the Petofi cynic club. When one looks at those given seats at the Education Roundtable, it’s really pretty funny. This organization jumped out at me as unique, the National Association of Large Families (NOE). I think Eva should devote a post to this organization which is no doubt fully autonomous from the Orban government. Then there is the President’s Committee of the Institute of Education, the National Youth Council, the National Public Education Council, the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Catholic Education Organization and Training Institute, the National Teachers’ Choir (did they sing), and additional organizations whose independence from Fidesz manipulation can be assured. Fidesz MPs hailed the roundtable in the media as a ”good and promising beginning,” another was quoted as saying: “It is gratifying that the dialogue started, ” yet another said, “We expect reassuring answers.” One wise Fidesz MP said: “The focus must always be on the child.” Rózsa Hoffmann, former Secretary of State described the education system as a sensitive instrument, and said if just a finger hurts, then the whole body can feeling ill. The good thing about the roundtable meeting might be that Miskolc Otto Herman Secondary School could… Read more »
tappanch
Guest
“National Teachers’ Choir (did they sing)” A good one. choir = énekkar, kórus But in post-2010 Hungary: kar = corporazione [as in Fascist Italy], It was one of the five pillars of Italian Fascism. The declared five pillars of Fascismo were: Cults of antic Rome, “youth”, violence, the principio del capo [> Führerprinzip] and corporativismo (state directed bodies incorporating employees and employers as a substitute for independent trade unions) There are also other meanings of “kar”, not relevant here: A. kar = [20th century] school of a university [bigger than department = tanszék] B. kar = status [late medieval Latin in Hungary, 1608-1848] karok & rendek = status & ordines = Hungarian Parliament before 1848. It included 4 “ordines” in 1608: in person: upper clergy [praelati], upper nobility [barones seu magnates]; through representatives: lower nobility [nobiles], free royal towns [liberae civitates]. It is uncertain whether karok [status] originally meant A. praelati only, or B. praelati & magnates or, on the contrary, C. nobiles & liberae civitates, or For instance, in 1840: upper house (tábla) total = 162, including upper clergy = 27 people, office holders = 33 upper nobility = 102 lower house total = 463, including clergy = 27… Read more »
tappanch
Guest

There is a stark philosophical clash between

Lincoln’s
“government of the people, by the people, for the people”
(which itself goes back to the prologue to John Wycliffe’s Bible translation in 1384)

and

Mussolini’s
“Tutto nello Stato, niente al di fuori dello Stato, nulla contro lo Stato”
(everything for the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state).

tappanch
Guest

So the word “kar” is the fusion of three words of different etymology.

A. [Turkic] kar = (upper) arm (part of the body)
B. [Greek] χορός = dancing group
C. [Latin] corpus = body

Istvan
Guest
Member

Dear Eva@ I keep wondering all these days whether Tom Lantos has anything to do with your topic of today. Probably some of our readers noticed that a small walkway was named after the Congressmen in Budapest 13th district recently. (The district mayor is from the MSZP but the act was approved by the city council anyway.) http://index.hu/belfold/budapest/2016/02/01/usa_tom_lantos_setany/
I am doubtful about the reasons for the actual media silence and the de-facto absence of government officials at this event.
Interestingly enough VP Joe Biden and Sen. Ed Markey sent tributes (letters) while Ms. Bell addressed the small crowd that gathered for the occasion. Anette and some members of the Lantos family, former Amb. Simonyi were also present.
Was that a deal to keep silence or that was the wish of Anette herself to limit media access to this event? Either way it is an embarrassment.
Are these sorts of deals is the great leader alluding to in response to POTUS? If true, my wild guess what else require silent diplomacy for the future to happen?
http://hungary.usembassy.gov/usg_speeches_02022016.html (pictures are on the Embassy’s FB page).

Guest

re: Congressman Lantios

‘The U.S. Congress was better for him having been a part of it…’

For sure. I enjoyed watching him at times when he chaired his committee and it was shown on C-Span’. At the last a Hungarian-American ‘Man For All Seasons’. He was a serious man for serious problems and he contributed much to the United States. I wished I could have met him. Arguably there was more integrity in Lantos as individual than in the entire Fideszian universe.

Istvan
Guest

Ok Eva I watched the video but I did not see one Sándor Rózsa reenactor in the march. What the heck is going on, isn’t that a standard at these affairs?

Guest

Why in Székesfehérvár?

To teach a lesson to Jews and other liberals that there could be lot worse things in store for them than a statue of Bálint Hóman, if they don’t shut their mouth and stop bothering Fidesz.

Simple.

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