Viktor Orbán and family in Washington

A couple of weeks ago I received a request from the Hungarian television station ATV to say something via Skype about the American election campaign. The reporter wanted to know whether a Democrat or a Republican president would be more advantageous to Viktor Orbán for friendlier relations between the countries. My answer was that “it doesn’t make the slightest difference who the president will be. Orbán is finished in Washington.” Anita Kőmüves of Népszabadság, who recently spent a couple of years in the United States, is of the same opinion. Today Kőmüves wrote an article titled “Not even money can help Orbán who is considered to be illiberal and thus written off.”

Kőmüves’s article is mostly about Századvég’s role as an intermediary between Connie Mack, the American lobbyist, and the Hungarian government. But the article has an attachment titled “The silent Orbán” that aroused my interest. The lobbyists in Washington and Budapest work pretty hard to arrange one-on-one meetings between Viktor Orbán and important American media personalities, but the Hungarian prime minister is reluctant to accommodate. Last September, for example, when he, accompanied by Péter Szijjártó, was in New York attending the meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, they managed to schedule an interview for him with the editor-in-chief of The Wall Street Journal that, according to Mack, yielded a couple of “positive” articles on Hungary. But Orbán in the last minute cancelled an interview with PBS, the public television station, and outright refused to give an interview to USA Today, a newspaper with a circulation of 1.6 million. Time magazine wanted to have an interview with Szijjártó, who simply couldn’t fit it into his schedule.

In light of the apparent eagerness to develop more favorable coverage on Hungary in the American media, it is difficult to explain why the prime minister shuns direct contact with American reporters. I don’t know which two Wall Street Journal articles Mack had in mind, but the one I found by Margit Fehér written on September 29, 2015 was judiciously neutral, with only a hint of surprise that despite the aging population, massive emigration, and “the country’s likely economic needs,” Orbán maintains that Hungary doesn’t need migrants. Considering the kind of coverage that Orbán usually gets in the American press, it might have been wise to give the interviews that Mack managed to line up for him. But I assume that Orbán, who so carefully controls media access to him in Hungary, was reluctant to encounter an American reporter who might ask him about Hungary’s treatment of the refugees or his relationship with Vladimir Putin.

The announcement that Viktor Orbán will attend the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC surprised Hungarian observers, especially since Bertalan Havasi, the head of Orbán’s press department, was very tight-mouthed about the trip. Several papers inquired about Orbán’s program in Washington but got no answers. The terse response was: “You will find out from the Hungarian public [sic] media.” I suspect that Orbán’s trip to Washington had only two purposes: for him to be among those delegation heads who were invited to an official dinner in the White House and for his family (including his wife and three of the younger children) to have a vacation.

I suspect that the program of the Nuclear Security Summit was known ahead of time and that the decision to attend hinged on the official dinner at the White House hosted by President Obama. I very much doubt that he would have attended this gathering without that enticing opportunity to look important. And, indeed, the photographer was on hand at the entrance to the White House when Orbán paused for a quick photo op. I saw a video of the arrival of about a dozen more important world leaders arriving at the White House and being escorted into the building. None of them carried a folder on their way to a fancy dinner, only Orbán. I wonder what he did with it at the dinner table. Later, Obama took pictures with all the 56 invited guests, including of course Orbán. But after the dinner Orbán decided to skip the rest of the conference and most likely went off somewhere with his family doing some sightseeing. It was Péter Szijjártó who represented Hungary on the second day of the summit.

Orban feher haz

Did Orbán have any bilateral discussions with other representatives? We know of one, with Giorgi Margvelasvili, president of Georgia, apparently about improving Georgian-Hungarian trade relations. He also gave a press conference to the sole reporter of M1, the Hungarian state television station. During that talk he emphasized that “many countries instead of eliminating nuclear energy are actually building up their nuclear capacity,” which he not surprisingly welcomed considering his insistence on the extension of the Paks nuclear power plant which, by the way, is under increasing pressure from the European Union.

This morning Együtt called Orbán’s visit to Washington “a family outing with a minimum amount of official duties.” Since Orbán had no opportunity to have bilateral talks either with American or with other dignitaries the whole trip was a waste of money. This description of the trip is not entirely justified because Obama had bilateral talks with very few prime ministers. But it is also true that Orbán did not attend earlier summits. In 2014 it was János Martonyi who represented Hungary.

Apparently Andrzej Duda, president of Poland, hoped for a meeting with the American president, but in the last few months U.S.-Polish relations have soured. Orbán didn’t stand a chance of meeting with Obama. American-Hungarian relations have been frosty for a very long time. Orbán’s problems with the United States began in 2001, right after the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. István Csurka, chairman of MIÉP (Magyar Igazság és Élet Pártja), made several statements both inside and outside of parliament which laid blame for the terrorist attack on the United States. Although official condolences from Orbán were appropriately phrased, he didn’t outright condemn Csurka’s statements. Géza Jeszenszky, Hungarian ambassador to Washington at the time, sent warnings about the serious consequences of the government’s lack of response to Csurka’s accusations, to no avail. And since 2010 there has been no reason for the United States government to change its opinion of the Hungarian prime minister. No amount of money thrown at lobbyists will make the slightest difference as long as the prime minister of Hungary is Viktor Orbán.

April 2, 2016
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Tibor farkas
Guest

Orbán Viktor would be much better off with Donald Trump as president

Richard Barry
Guest

Orbán Viktor IS Donald Trump.

Observer
Guest

DoesTrump stand a real chance with so much flack from inside the GOP? My guess is none, but it’s just a guess.

webber
Guest

A chance of winning the GOP nomination? Yes. A chance of winning the general elections? No.
The Republicans are in a bind. If they nominate Trump, they will lose the elections. Clinton will win easily (UNLESS something really foul comes out about Clinton – and it might).
If they don’t nominate Trump, but Cruz, they may have three huge problems:
1st, Trump is likely to run as an independent, meaning he’ll take votes from Cruz, meaning Clinton will win very easily.
2nd, Even if Trump doesn’t run as an independent, as Istvan pointed out above the party will be torn apart.
3rd, Cruz was born in Canada. Remember what a scandal “birthers” made about Obama’s birthplace (Hawaii – solidly part of the US). The “birthers,” possibly led by Trump this time, will tear into Cruz if he is the candidate. In the very unlikely scenario of Cruz winning the general elections, there will be a constitutional crisis. No presidential candidate ever was born outside the US. The Supreme Court would have to decide whether Cruz really is eligible. If he is not, the court will also have to decide where to go from there. It’s a situation without precedent in American history.

Zalán
Guest

Trump will not waste his money on running as an independent.

What matters is really is Trump vs. Clinton (or possibly Sanders, if Clinton has to resign due to the emails, which is a distinct possibility) in a few battle ground states.

You can safely assume that the reliable red states will vote for Trump against the ‘hated feminist liberal from the Clinton-clan’.

Can Clinton or Sanders defeat Trump in Ohio, Florida, North Carolina, Virgina, Indiana, Wisconsin, and even Pennsylvania?

Actually Trump has a serious shot with the dissatisfied white working class people. They can’t blame themselves (for failing in capitalism) or capitalism itself, so they will naturally blame the Chinese, Mexicans, liberals, gays etc.

I don’t envy the Democrats to be honest. Liberals are in for a nice surprise if they think it’s gonna be smooth sailing for the Democrats. Plus, the Republicans will hold onto the Senate and the House, plus to their influence at the state level (which is significantly bigger than that of the Democrats). It looks as though the Republicans are in a bad shape, but that’s a huge, huge misunderstanding.

webber
Guest

You are clueless. Look at the poll data. Trump would be demolished by Clinton.

Observer
Guest

Yes, my guess is democrats will win by significant margin.

Member

Sorry Zalán but you are very, very misinformed. Practically everything you wrote is either untrue or misconstrued.

Since this is a blog about Hungarian politics and not American I’ll restrain myself any further, but I recommend you have a look at Larry Sabato’s latest electoral college prediction, which is map 2: http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/the-only-thing-that-matters/

347 electoral votes for the Democrats! It’s still very early but that pretty much refutes everything you wrote above.

webber
Guest

Excellent piece. And that was a summary before Trump uttered his stupidities about abortion, and alienated a large percentage of women (and men, for that matter: more than half the electorate)
My guess – just a hunch – is that if Trump wins the Republican nomination, his New York accent will hurt him badly in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Much as Idaho leans to the right, people out there I know have a bit of a prejudice against Easterners, and real estate agents. Trump sounds like and is what they hate.

Member

@Tibor Farkas

They would look like Beavis and Butthead.

Member
I’m sure Orban was just farting around for a week waiting for the handshake with the president. As I wrote this earlier, I saw the guy Wednesday afternoon, around 4 at the Scott Circle in the District (two minutes from my office), where the Hungarian state bought a new building for almost 20 million dollars for the embassy. Orban was sitting in the outdoor area of a restaurant with Ambassador Szemerkenyi discussing something while he was munching on fries (I’m sure it was fries). If I have to guess he was chiding the ambassador about not being able to organize a White House visit for him so he had to stick around for that Friday pow-wow. The interesting thing was that there was absolutely no one with him – no driver, no TEK agents, nobody. Comrade Bastion was totally crapped on. The new building is nice. The price is right, considering the place, I was just wondering if it was really needed. Viktor blew the price of a good soccer stadium on the new place for Szemerkenyi? Weird. What is with these Orbanite ambassadors and their million dollar moving mania? Do you remember Dezso Kekessy in Paris? The guy who… Read more »
Member

I think it was her predecessor who initiated the swap. However you have to discount the previous estate in Rock Creek Park to estimate the real costs of the new building. Useless, anyway.

Member

True. But I would still estimate the difference north of 10 million. If we owned the building in the Shoemaker St.

Magdolna Lutring
Guest
Dear Éva, you’re absolutely right. Unfortunately, we, leftits-libearals are utterly ashamed of our PM. I have already written about my flow of life and the connection to Fidesz but now I feel like writing about it again. I left Fidesz on 4th Nov. 1993…(the Russians occupied Hungary on 4th Nov. in 1956!!!) …it turned out that luckily, I hadn’t even been a member as I was 35,5 years old when I had “joined” the then very nice, absolutely progressive, liberal people. Had to leave the party as I wouldn’t have been able to look at myself in the mirror because of their headquarters’ scandal (the money then went to O’s dad to buy mines) and that they had a luxury car business: hired out great big American cars to customers to promote the party…BRRR. What was this compared to the billions of Forints which are wasted on almost empty stadiums and the money which is flowing into friendly businesses and the leaders pockets… And you know, now the compulsory school age limit is 16…vocational school student have FIVE academic lessons per week…The O gvmnt wants empty – headed people. So, let’s go on with my Fidesz story. Fidesz had very… Read more »
Guest

Magdolna, thanks for your very moving account!
For an outsider/foreigner like me it’s very difficult to try to understand how Fidesz could move from a liberal position to the concept of “illiberal democracy” too.

Istvan
Guest
Anita Kőmüves article seemed to me to focus on the money spent by the Hungarian government on image promotion via lobbyists Connie Mack and Századvég Foundation. It does not really speak to the question Eva was asked, whether a Democrat or a Republican president would be more advantageous to Viktor Orban for friendlier relations between the countries. If Sec Clinton becomes President my guess is that relations will stay the same unless PM Orban is willing to make a turn against Russia and openly welcomes US NATO combat forces being stationed in Hungary and Hungary increases the military budget to two percent of GDP. Then much illiberalism could be forgiven by a President Clinton as she tightens the screws on Putin and moves in a more confrontational manner towards Russian global ambitions. If Trump becomes President I am fairly confident that Orban’s illiberalism and hostility towards immigrants will not be a major factor in the relationship. Time magazine a few days ago published a summary of Trump’s foreign policy views http://time.com/4277809/donald-trump-america-first-foreign-policy/ . The New York Times did a similar and deeper analysis last week see http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/27/us/politics/donald-trump-foreign-policy.html Orban and Trump share a dislike of Merkel, Trump said of her in relation… Read more »
Member

I can’t wait to see Orban kissing President Clinton’s hand …

dvhr
Guest

Then she should check the ring…

Member

Szabolcs Panyi of Index did an overview of all the candidates running for President and predicted what each might mean for Hungary about a month ago. There’s a lot of unknowns in here, but I think it’s about as comprehensive a look as we’re going to get at the moment.

http://index.hu/kulfold/usa/feher_haz/2016/03/07/melyik_elnokjeloltnek_orulne_a_legjobban_orban/

webber
Guest

Through his articles to date Panyi has repeatedly demonstrated that he has no clue about American politics. I suggest you ignore anything Panyi has to say about American politics, because he’s consistently off in bizarre ways that show a complete lack of knowledge of American society and politics. Instead read British and American articles, and glean the probabilities from them for yourself.

Member

Istvan, reading you regularly I have an impression that you believe YOUR government has never learned a lesson. You might be right on Nam but I kindly disagree with you on Iraq and many other examples of yours. US wanted democracy in Iraq (like in BiH) disregard the circumstances. I think Obama rides this horse on the “other side”. He often speaks one thing but do differently (like immigration/ deportations). You seem to take Trump seriously but if elected I think he would behave differently. There is always progress in thinking and acting, there is always a learning curve. Foreign policy that involves many aspects was never black and white.

Member

A delegation of US Representatives is coming to Hungary to meet with Orbán next week, which will include “Putin’s favorite American lobbyist,” Dana Rohrabacher.

http://vs.hu/mind/osszes/putyin-kedvenc-amerikai-lobbistajaval-talalkozik-orban-a-jovo-heten-0401

Observer
Guest

Guys,
I have the Connie Mack’s list of lobbying targets, but without the email addresses. If the latter can be obtained we could do some counter lobbying, sending some of these posts and more out.
Any ideas?

fogell
Guest

Trump’s advisors are pro-Russian, pro-Putin.

Orban would surely benefit with Trump who will be cozy with the “winning” Putin.

So Orban is rooting for Trump for sure. He might be sending some campaign donations too to the Donald. Trump would simply hand Hungary over to the Russians (into the Russian’s sphere of interest) and this is what Orban wants too.

http://qz.com/650201/donald-trump-hired-an-advisor-to-ukraines-notorious-former-president-putin-buddy-viktor-yanukovych/

webber
Guest

The Kremlin has already issued an official complaint about Putin’s depiction by the Trump campaign, in which Putin is depicted as an enemy along with Isis people. Just watch the following (link below). There is no way Trump and Putin would get along.

Istvan
Guest

I agree with you Webber. Trump would only become the friend of Putin if he supported the US in a strategy to contain China’s growing power. That is unlikely. Right now Putin is trying to create an alliance with China against my country see http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/07/china-russia-superpower-axis on the complexity of Putin consummating such an alliance.

Guest

You know from the economic looks of it China would appear to need the US more than it would ‘need’ Russia. It’s evident China wants to overtake the US economically but if they want to do it why would they want an alliance with a country that really isn’t so sharp when it comes to say hi tech and real good capital goods? That would appear to be a definite niche to have access to or develop. And other than natural resources what else can Russia give to China. Perhaps it would be more of a headache since it would appear both want to be ‘boss’ in the economic kitchen. Plenty of burnt toast there I think.

petofi
Guest

“…other than natural resources what else can Russia give to China.”

–Land.

piroska
Guest

Hungary will undertake to build a new dam on the Danube.

Orban will soon agree with Fico.

http://nol.hu/belfold/magyarorszag-elvtelen-volt-de-hatalmas-bukas-lesz-belole-1609053

Guest

” None of …[the other country leaders]… carried a folder on their way to a fancy dinner, only Orbán.”

Well, I never thought it possible, but I almost feel sorry for Orbán. That a nation’s leader is so ignorant about etiquette and so lacking in social graces, as to appear at a formal White House function with a folder in his hand?

Either this naive stunt was intended purely as a PR maneuvre, for the benefit of his equally gauche and ignorant supporters, or the man has no advisors about how to behave at such a function.

If it is the latter then it brings to mind a novel word, (coined in the USA of course, where clever chaps and chapesses can be relied on to invent cool new ways to describe the almost indescribable) – namely, Fardo.

Urban Dictionary description of Fardo :

“The feeling of embarrassment you have for someone when they can’t feel embarrassed themselves. “

Guest

Good one. Here’s another…. FOMO

‘Fear of Missing Out’

Viktor likes the political ‘ackshun’ here in the States. Good for the ‘PR’ back at the Magyar ‘ranch’. If he can get a handshake with the President who is now ‘retired but still on active duty’ he’ll do it!

And then he’ll continue with the preening and shameless lobbying here. Just hope our reps don’t become. C.H.U.M.P.S with those who have F.O.M.O. It’s ugly to get faked out with the likes of those who get a free trip , all expenses paid on the population’s dome and allegedly represent the best of their nation.

webber
Guest

Hungary’s GDP per capita is less than half of America’s poorest state, Mississippi’s. Who in their right mind in the US cares what the Great O does? Certainly reps don’t. Nor should they.

Guest

You know Kissinger said diplomacy was the art of restraining power. Arguably we must have had a little power outage along the way with the amply defined ‘mafia state’. Warning to US: be on the lookout for smooth talking punks…they can get away with a lot if you’re not lookin’ …;-)…

webber
Guest

I don’t want the US to be the world’s policeman, thanks. If Hungarians want to let their country go to hell, why should any American care?

Guest

Re: ‘I don’t want the US to be the world’s policeman’

We already seem to be. And if the Magyars keep on acting the way they do and who they pal around with we’ll probably see another aspect of the US as ‘rendor if European events perhaps take a turn for the worse later on. And that is after bearing in mind Magyarorszag’s as well as Europe’s proclivities in making er..good political decisions in the past and now in the present. They’re riding closer and closer to a flame. Just my take.

At this point, we’re too involved with Europe. Can’t get away with it. We’re ‘knee deep in the European hoopla’ whether we like it or not’.

BritinBudapest
Guest

Interesting – good to hear that the impression in Hungary of a successful state visit was all smoke. Also, I am now remembering Clinton’s very pointed letters to Orban when she was Secretary of State – definitely she stood up to him and has a history with him already, notwithstanding any of the other moments mentioned.

spectator
Guest

Orbán’s “lucky” streak still holds, though, he’s putting all those black cats out of job.
As I heard he had a meeting with Giorgi Margvelashvili, the Georgian president, and on the same night the war erupted again between Georgia and Azerbaijan..!

If I was a head of a state, I would seriously consider any contact with him, really!
“Got to keep running
Stormbringer coming”

Member

I hope he meets with Trump! 🙂

tappanch
Guest
tappanch
Guest
igori
Guest

Fidesz doesn’t use Panama much.

Member

Apparently they do. Read 3:54 pm.

tappanch
Guest

As of January 27, 2016, notable countries that did not sign the MCAA (MULTILATERAL COMPETENT AUTHORITY AGREEMENT) are:

Singapore,
Qatar, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Iran,

Panama, Venezuela,
Bahamas, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Trinidad

Kiribati, Vanuatu, Tuvalu, East Timor, Micronesia, Fiji, Tonga,
Nauru, Papua,
most African countries except South Africa
Mongolia, Vietnam, Brunei, Philippines, Sri Lanka

These are the places to search for Orban’s and other Fidesz potentates’ stashed money.

Do you remember Fidesz vice chairman Kosa’s strange trip to the United Arab Emirates (Dubai) and New Zealand [or perhaps, one of the Pacific islands in the list above] in November 2014?

http://civishir.hu/kozelet/dubajnal-sokkal-messzebbre-mehettek-kosaek/1120104234

PS
List of signatories with effective dates of September 2017 or 2018 marked:

https://www.oecd.org/ctp/exchange-of-tax-information/MCAA-Signatories.pdf

tappanch
Guest

Kosa’s traveling partner was the chairman of the board of the “Magyar Művészeti Akadémia”, which receives billions of taxpayers’ money by the largesse of the Orban government.

http://nol.hu/belfold/kosa-egymilliobol-bulizott-uj-zelandon-1500143

tappanch
Guest

non-signatory European countries:

Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Bosnia, Belarus

egy csup méz
Guest

Singapore is way, way more important for Fidesz.

Guest

What are you trying to tell us?

Istvan
Guest

The rise of the Panamanian Law Firm Law Firm Mossak Fonesca is related to the US invasion of Panama in December 1989 (operation Just Cause) in which 18 members of the US Army were killed in combat along with several sailors and Marines. I was sent to what was then US Fort Clayton in Panama prior to the invasion for logistical reasons. With the elimination of the dictator General Noriega, who served as a U.S. intelligence asset and paid informant of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1967, who controlled all corruption in the country pathways were opened that did not exist before. General Noriega was in a US federal prison until 2010 was then sent to France where he was imprisoned until 2011 and then sent back to Panama to serve another 20 years and unfortunately had brain hemorrhage so now he sits in prison with limited communication ability.

My guess is that there was very little about the operations of Mossak Fonesca that was completely unknown to the US intelligence services for many years. The information in the leaks I suspect were no surprise to those at CIA HQ in Langley.

tappanch
Guest

The family of Azerbaijan President Ilham Aliyev exposed:

https://panamapapers.icij.org/the_power_players/?lang=en#50

tappanch
Guest

Offshore accounts of Putin, the current presidents of Ukraine, Pakistan, Argentina and China are also revealed.

Member
Hungary’s own Zsolt Horváth who “was a member of Hungary’s National Assembly between June 1998 and May 2014 for the ruling Fidesz party. A physician and dentist, Horvath headed the Office of Social Policy of Prime Minister Viktor Orbán from February to May 2000. He was then parliamentary secretary for health from June 2000 to May 2001 and served on the National Assembly’s health committee.” is on the lis of the giant leak of offshore financial records that exposes global array of crime and corruption. “In October 2013, when he was still a member of the National Assembly, Zsolt Horváth became director of Excelle Media International Ltd., although Horváth’s most recent declaration of financial interests to the Hungarian parliament, made in 2014, does not mention the offshore company. In September 2014, four months after he left politics, he became director of Mayer & Collins Trading Company Ltd. Hungarian businessman Imre Kökényesi is co-director of both companies, which manufacture and sell toys in China, Hong Kong and Hungary, and are registered with Mossack Fonseca in the Seychelles. Company Registration & Business Services Limited, which works with Mossack Fonseca, manages the companies out of Hong Kong, and is also shareholder of Excelle.… Read more »
Guest

I wonder where this will lead:
http://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/apr/03/panama-papers-money-hidden-offshore
Not only the Russians and the Hungarians are involved in what I first wanted to call “Panamagate” – Panama Papers however sounds even better.
It’s unbelievable corruption – and so many Swiss lawyers and companies are involved, imho it shows how almost every “good thing” that we’re told about (like how wonderful Swiss democracy is …) is based on a lie! Greed everywhere …

Guest

A bit OT:
The next (?) statesman O will visit is former German chancellor Kohl …
Kohl (like CSU boss Seehofer) favours O’s refugee politics it seems over Mrs Merkel’s ideas.

The German press is not amused and reminds us that Kohl should have gone to jail for accepting millions of “gifts” from industry for his Party CDU and not telling the court who the money came from …

http://www.spiegel.de/politik/deutschland/kohl-will-orban-treffen-europaeer-mit-herzblut-a-1085288.html

He’s a “real Christian” like Seehofer who got his secretary pregnant and left her with the child – while ranting against homosexual couples because “every child needs a father and a mother” …

spectator
Guest

But honestly, would anybody be really surprised if nothing of substance would turn up as result?
Grow up, will you?
Either these scum get eradicated for god, or we all accept that that’s the way it goes.

The time has already passed – quite a while ago, in fact – when we still pretend that nothing really happened.
We should – or at least supposed to – act upon this information, in case, we have those balls what required. Or alternatively we can join to the asslicking masses, just to be on to safe side.
If you can stomache it, that’s it.

Personally I against any kind of such compromises, but hey, you can do whatever- I’m a liberal, remember!

pyuy
Guest
Orban is learning, as is Polish new leaders that unless you’re a liberal fanatic bent on selling your country and people out that DC (at least under Obama) is a hostile place. Hungary doesn’t really need the U.S.A, neither does Poland. That is why I really find it pathetic that leaders are running there to show themselves, when if they focus on building relationships with countries who actually treat the leaders of other nations like leaders and not like serfs, that Hungary and Poland would be in a much better position to have respect from DC. Look at the difference to how Orban was treated when he visited Russia, or when Czech President Zemen received the Chinese president. East European countries remain irrelevant once under the thumbs of U.S leaders. Once they control the leadership or have the leadership scared they no longer even embrace or receive them. Orban is not being rejected by the Washington elites because he is hostile illiberal, but because Washington already knows Hungary is under their control, and that Hungary is an significant small east European nation. Doesn’t matter who has been the Hungarian or Polish leader, but it’s been years since Washington took any… Read more »
webber
Guest

If you actually believe what you wrote, then you should also say Hungary and Poland leaving NATO.
I think Poles understand what they are getting from the US. It’s quite significant.
The US military should not be committed to the security of countries which follow the policies you advocate.

webber
Guest

then you should also say Hungary and Poland should leave NATO (sorry for the garbled sentence above)

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