A tamed new Jobbik?

It was only about a month ago that I wrote that Gábor Vona, chairman of Jobbik, the extremist right-wing party, had “cleaned house.” Ahead of the forthcoming party congress he said that he would veto the nomination of the three current deputy chairmen in case they decide to run again, that he needs people who will support his vision of a new Jobbik. At that time all three were ready to defy Vona, and many observers were certain that Jobbik, like so many far-right parties before it, would splinter.

Why is Vona determined to change the image of his party? The official line is that Jobbik, which was founded as a youth group in 2003, is no longer “a teenager” but an adult. It is now so important that it might soon be a government party. And for such a role, a radical populist party that is variously described as fascist, neo-Nazi, extremist, anti-Semitic, anti-Roma, and homophobic is unacceptable.

The other reason, which Vona obviously doesn’t want to talk about, is the decreasing popularity of Jobbik. The party’s best year was 2014, when it received 20.22% of the votes, which meant support from over one million voters. Today, its support is hovering around 11-12%. Vona reasons that, despite the results of public opinion polls, Fidesz’s support is on the decline and that disappointed former Fidesz fans are reluctant to vote for “those communists” they hear so much about. An attractive alternative might be another right-wing party with an untarnished past.

Előd Novák, one of the sacked deputy chairmen and Gábor Vona / Source: Origo

Előd Novák, one of the sacked deputy chairmen, and Gábor Vona / Source: Origo

Vona might be quite right about the declining popularity of Fidesz, which can be gauged by some of the more important by-elections, but the question is whether Jobbik voters are ready to support the kind of party Vona envisages. According to a recent Medián poll, 54% of Jobbik voters are strong and 15% are moderate anti-Semites. It is therefore doubtful that they would embrace a party that no longer incites against Gypsies or delivers anti-Semitic harangues.

For the time being, however, Vona managed to prevent a split in the party. The three former deputy chairmen, after initial threats of defiance, in the end quietly accepted their fate and Vona, unopposed, was reelected chairman of the party, though with only 80.5% of the votes. At least one of his deputies, János Volner, who has taken over the leadership of the parliamentary delegation from Vona, actually got more votes than the party chairman. So, there is a fairly large minority among the delegates who are not enamored with Vona’s plans.

What are these plans? According to Vona, Jobbik will become “a national people’s party.” It will be a large party that attracts voters from all segments of society, that doesn’t simply cater to subsets of the population but tries to satisfy the political demands of large groups of voters from all walks of life. With such widespread support, Jobbik will be able to stand for the rights of those who, with “quiescent roaring,” demand change.

Vona’s speech at the congress lasted 30 minutes. The 700 delegates apparently listened to it “in numbed silence.” Not once was his speech interrupted by applause. The speech was full of assurances, like “I know you are worried, I know you are afraid of change, but change is inevitable.” He tried to calm his audience’s nerves by assuring them that the change in the party’s direction is not really that radical because the term “national people’s party” was already in the party’s 2003 founding document. At the same time, he admitted that the program of this new party is far from ready. They have to define the meaning of a “modern conservative” ideology. They have to specify what they mean by “eco-social market economy,” “meritocracy,” “democracy built on value,” and a foreign policy based on the Russian-German-Turkish triangle. The party will have to pay more attention to Gypsy-Hungarian coexistence and the migrant issue. As is evident, all this is pretty vague. In the meantime Jobbik voters are watching the total reshaping of the party with skepticism or, in many cases, antagonism.

In the past Jobbik wasn’t only Euro-skeptic but promised to take Hungary out of the European Union as soon as they were in a position to do so. About a year ago Vona was still talking about the crisis of a sick Europe, which required Hungary to implement a three-stage strategy vis-à-vis the European Union. First, there should be a wide-ranging discussion about relations with Brussels, about the contracts signed by Hungary before its entrance, and in general about Hungary’s membership in the Union. Hungary should then demand a change in the constitution of the European Union. Third, there should be a referendum in which Hungarians could decide whether they want to remain in the European Union.

Today Vona seems to have an entirely different opinion not only about Hungarian membership in the European Union but about the elements that made up the cornerstone of Jobbik’s program.

After the congress reporters pressed him for more details about this new “national people’s party” and its tenets. A few days ago, during an interview on Inforádió, Vona came up with the surprising announcement that “leaving the union is not an important question because Europe will be changing in the next five to ten years and perhaps it will emerge better than it is now.” Regarding the migrant question, “it is a tremendous challenge for the European Union and might convince its politicians that they have to rethink some of its operating mechanisms.” As for NATO, he doesn’t think “it would be a rational idea to leave it … but we have to do everything in our power to avoid a conflict with Russia. Hungary must play the role of a bridge rather than of a satellite.” Finally, Vona no longer advocates that Hungary default on its national debt. At present there is no need for that either.

In 1993 Viktor Orbán attempted this kind of volte face by remaking the liberal Fidesz into a conservative party, and he succeeded. But the situation was very different then. MDF, under the weight of four years of governing, had collapsed and there was no other right-wing party to replace it. Today there is Fidesz, which still has a substantial following. Therefore, Vona’s attempt to remake his party in the hope of gaining support from disillusioned Fidesz voters seems unlikely to succeed on a large scale. But perhaps there will be an opening from the left. LMP’s chair Bernadett Szél announced the other day that her party is ready to work with both MSZP and Jobbik. That’s a first. I wonder what will come of it. Jobbik and LMP have at least one thing in common. Both are ardent enemies of global capitalism.

June 4, 2016
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Karl Pfeifer
Guest

The Neonazi László Toroczkai joined Jobbik and was elected as deputy chairman
So Jobbik remains a Neonazi Party

tappanch
Guest

I second.

Guest

Re: Jobbik being a bunch of Neonazis and not as popular

At this point GV now has to look at shifting strategy where he believes ‘moderation’ is key to defuse the weaknesses in his party. Perhaps he will see how far supporters go with proposed change and then adjust and see how far his supporters will go with him. There will be a testing phase. Also, it would appear he would like to capitalize in some way on the growing far-right parties in Europe and contribute to it. A real potential headache down the line for the EU if not dangerous considering the current destabilized political environment.

And it follows the GV’s thoughts on refashioning the party is of great concern. Can’t see even with any ‘changes’ how this Jobbik can change its stripes. Here is another possible Trojan horse making its way potentially into Europe. Fellows who found nationalistic paramilitary groups for intimidation and defense usually have other agendas. And GV looks as if he is ready and willing to light up kindling in Europe to further the peculiar Magyar platform that at bottom kids nobody.

tappanch
Guest

“Ils n’ont rien appris, ni rien oublié” [Talleyrand]

The Matolcsy clan is proud of its nepotism, after Chief Prosecutor Polt (whose wife is part of this scheme) and Orban expressed support for the diversion of one billion euros of National Bank money (and growing) to private purposes.

http://magyaridok.hu/belfold/szemerey-tamas-mi-ezzel-problema-721789/

Doubling down:

A new bill, to be approved next week, will make it possible for any state-owned company to make its transactions secret for 15 or 30 years as it sees fit.

http://444.hu/2016/06/04/ujabb-lehetoseget-kapnak-az-allami-cegek-hogy-eltitkoljak-mire-hasznaljak-a-rajuk-bizott-penzt

tappanch
Guest

Matyas and Tamas Matolcsy were MPs for the “United Hungarian National Socialist party & Arrow Cross Front” between 1939 and 1944.

http://kanadaihirlap.com/2015/02/22/matolcsy-rokonok/
http://hvg.hu/itthon/20130204_Ungvary_Matolcsy_csaladja_erintett_volt_a

A partial family tree I found on the internet:
http://www.kre.hu/portal/images/eletutinterjuk/Pasztor_Janosne_csaladfa.pdf

tappanch
Guest
tappanch
Guest

Gyorgy Matolcsy’s PhD advisor = his subordinate in the National Bank = former MP of the former neo-Nazi-ish party MIEP. This party was practically co-opted by Fidesz in the 2000s.

http://www.168ora.hu/itthon/matolcsy-gyorgy-lentner-csaba-pallas-athene-alapitvany-doktori-mnb-145812.html

Guest

Re: Talleyrand

A interesting personality who managed to keep his head on tight during the tumultuous days of French politics in the 19th while ‘changing his spots’ serving each time in much different governments. . Napoleon , no fan, remarked about him that he was ‘the silk stocking filled with mud’. He arguably was a future template for the new illiberalists.

Abstractions for the French diplomat like justice, love, freedom etc seen as ideals were there to be espoused. However, when it came to the quest for power those underlying ‘principles’ relative to the abstractions needed to be dropped or changed to fit in with the new political outlook/environment. The cagey diplomat certainly was a ‘utilitarian’ man.

As noted, we’ve seen the above with Orban originally as fervent anti-communist on ‘Monday’. With Tuesday, the weather changed to sunny and illiberalist. GV looks to be perhaps a new Talleyrand clone after watching the Orban pivot. Europe possibly awaits the new budding ‘moderate’ conservative. It’ll be a wonder if it’s pulled off.

Observer
Guest

The rape and pillage goes on.

Tnx @tapanch.

Alex Kuli
Guest
“The other reason, which Vona obviously doesn’t want to talk about, is the decreasing popularity of Jobbik. The party’s best year was 2014, when it received 20.22% of the votes, which meant support from over one million voters. Today, its support is hovering around 11-12%.” Dear Eva – Please understand that Jobik’s results from the 2014 election cannot be compared to “whole sample” results from opinion polls. Jobbik scored between 11 and 15 percent in the “whole sample” group in polls conducted in April 2016 (the most recent available). This sample includes people who decline to declare a party preference and those who said they would not vote. Election results, obviously, do not include people who stay at home or refuse to declare a preference. If you want to compare Jobbik’s 2014 election results to its current popularity, it is necessary to use the “sure voter” (“biztos szavazo”) polls. The “sure voter” results paint a very different picture: Jobbik scored an average of 21 percent in the four polls conducted in April 2016, which is basically the same as its 2014 election-day result. One poll had Jobbik at a whopping 26 percent among “sure voters.” Since Jobbik historically does better… Read more »
Guest

What is this supposed to mean?
a foreign policy based on the Russian-German-Turkish triangle

Germany is surely no friend of Putin – and Erdogan is also being ruffled right now by the German parliament which voted almost unanimously that the killing of Armenians is to be considered a genocide. Erdogan is very angry now …

Max
Guest

wolfi7777 – It is just a further proof the HU diplomatic knowledge is in ruins.

Orbán said the same on this triangle being the cornerstone of his government’s diplomacy on 9 March in front of HU ambassadors.

Despite the fact that Ankara and Moscow are effectively in trade war, while Merkel and Steinmeier despise Orbán.

Guest
London Calling! “Hungary should then demand a change in the constitution of the European Union. “ This is amusing . The problem with Hungary and the EU in the first place is that Hungary never shared the same values from the get go. And still doesn’t. Neither does Turkey who shouldn’t have even been considered – regardless of Cameron encouraging it – and the EU desperately buying off Erdoğan with the refugees. Germany has told it like it is with Turkey – yes it was genocide and everyone knows it. So Hungary doesn’t share these values so shouldn’t even have become a member – they didn’t have the credentials from the start – nor does Turkey and nor did lying Greece. So is it any wonder that Britain has decided it needed a referendum? No. Not because we don’t share the same values…… but because the EU has left us. I sometimes think it’s the EU that should be deciding on Brexit not the Brits. Brexit is getting perilously close and even though I voted ‘in’ in 1975 – and I will still vote that way in June. I won’t be concerned at all if we vote ‘leave’. For the… Read more »
PALIKA
Guest

The English are delusional. They were rescued by the USA in two wars last century. Do not believe post Brexit they have much to offer beyond non cooperation with their neighbours and likely further wars. Avoid Brexit and do not treat its consequences lightly.

webber
Guest

PALIKA, calm down a bit. Your line about the English starting wars is ridiculous. The English have not started a war in a very long time, and will not if they leave the EU.

PALIKA
Guest

No, you are right that the two wars in 20th century were not their initiative. My point is that they overestimate their position of power and in the 20th century this was very dangerous especially when in WW2 they were unprepared. The Brexiters are delusional if they seriously think the English can stand alone in Europe. What seems to lend support to this delusion is their failure to understand that if it had not been for the US and Stalin there would not be an EU to oppose.

webber
Guest
I think Britain might do fine outside the EU. I don’t think getting vicious about the British is helpful. If you want them to stay in, use honeyed words: “We’ll be sad to see you go. We love you.” Tell them what creeps they are, and what do you think will happen? Why do I think Britain will do fine outside the EU? First, because there are other prosperous countries outside the EU (Switzerland and Norway, for example). Second, because Britain is a net payer into the EU coffers, and would end up with more money to spend at home. Third, because Britain could return to legislation that encourages business and innovation and ditch EU legislation that stifles it (allow me NOT to list it – look for yourself). Finally, and most importantly, I think Britain has a culture of work and innovation, and that it will do fine. As to the objection, that Britain would lose the benefits: In the case of free trade, that is silly and wrong – Britain could keep free trade with the EU if it wanted, and free travel (look at Norway and Switzerland again – indeed, look at Serbia). The only benefit Britain… Read more »
Guest

Of course you are right. This was the response I had formulated in my head – for PALINKA – but couldn’t be bothered to apprise her/him.

It’s fairly apparent to most informed contributors on here.

Guest

As regards ‘honeyed words’ – I enjoyed your irony! It’s been tried! And won’t work.

We much prefer the ‘creeps’ path however futile!

webber
Guest

There’s something very wrong about your comment>
“they overestimate their position of power and in the 20th century this was very dangerous especially when in WW2 they were unprepared.”
Were they not prepared? After the fall of France, Britain stood alone against Hitler’s Germany for a full year. They refused Germany’s offers of peace, at a time when it looked as though Germany would win. It wasn’t until Germany attacked the Soviet Union that the tide turned.
Any comment that denigrates Britain’s WWII achievement is, to me, at best mis-informed and sickening.
God Bless Britain!

Guest

Palinka?

We don’t need lessons from a Hungarian…..

Guest

Britain ‘delusional’! What history are you reading? Maria Schmidt?

Goodness.

Guest

And of course, Hungary got it right!

Hungary should leave the EU – or more appropriately – be kicked out.

PALIKA
Guest

I did not write ‘Britain delusional”. Brexit is an Engilsh Tory problem.

I think maybe Orban deserves to be kicked out, I would resort to this after all other steps have failed. Once you have done this, it is difficult to have any influence. The aim of Europe is to encourage cooperation however unpalatable that is to that part of the English population I described as delusional. For further reading please listen to the John Major interview on the Marr programme today.

Guest

I think Palika has a point here – the Brits think they’re something special but actually Britain alone would be rather insignificant economically and politically imho!
Maybe they have something in common with Hungarians – dreams/memories of an Empire …

On the other hand most people in Western Europe (especially Benelux and Germany) know that only a united Europe can be considered a significant political and economic power!
United we stand – divided we fall …

PS: In a way that is the most important lesson Germany had to learn after two world wars – no more “Greater Germany” – unlike some Hungarians which have been whining again about Trianon (June 4, 1920)

PALIKA
Guest

wolfi7777,

I need hardly say that I am 100% in agreement.

Guest

Webber’s got it right.

“Calm down a bit”

And btw Brexit is not just an “English Tory Problem” – what is your current affairs diet?

Quoting John Major is rather futile – he’s a spent force with no influence.

Just leave Brexit to us eh?

This is Hungarian Spectrum and I raised Britain’s situation in a Hungarian context.

Eva can fight her own battles thank you. This is her blog to decide who can and who can’t contribute.

<b"Avoid Brexit and do not treat its consequences lightly."

Who do you think you are?

Arrogant certainly.

PALIKA
Guest

This blog is not properly moderated. In my experience Eva, this man would have his messages barred and if he persisted his access removed. Free discussion does not include the right to hurls nationalist insults. Vid. “We do not need a lesson from a Hungarian.”

The subsequent contributions and his responses are patronising and its tone is usually treated as objectionable.

Guest

Have you thought of going elsewhere?

webber
Guest

Palika – honestly… Do you think the British have ANYTHING to learn from Orban’s Hungary? Can you name one thing?

I don’t think Charlie’s comment was so bad.

webber
Guest

Charlie – I hope you’ll read my comment above (3:31), because you’ve called me anti-Brit in the past and I think that once you’ve read it you’ll understand that I don’t have a single negative feeling about Britain, with the exception of a deep hatred of binge-drinking and associated mayhem — a hatred shared by most of my British friends. But hey, no country is perfect!

Guest

webber?

I’ve got the measure of you! And I’ve (almost!) accused you of being too erudite – and have – and do- enjoy our exchanges.
Long may they continue! (You’re still wrong about that statue though!!)

webber
Guest

Wolfi, I think the Brits are something special….
I also think they might actually do better outside the EU. How the EU will do without them is another question – clearly the rest of us will be impoverished by Brexit.
Letting Brits know we feel that way might convince them to stay. They are special, in my view, in often showing great generosity.
If, however, you tell them “you think you’re so special!” well, what do you think they will want to do? Stay in a union with you? It’s a sure formula for divorce.

I must say, the bitter comments by Palika, to me, sound like those of a man who has found out his wife is cheating on him. Your comment is a bit similar.

If they want to go, wish them well. It’s the only way for us all to keep our dignity.

Guest

Webber,, the problem is: we’re talking about “The Brits”, “The Hungarians” etc but of course opinions differ very much. My British family (one of my sisters married an Englishman and their daughter married a guy from Ireland) and my friends in London are all for the EU – and don’t care for Royalty btw …

But having followed the Guardian for many years I have a feeling that at least some Brits still live in the 19th Century …

just as I was very surprised hearing a young acquaintance here in Hungary whining about Trianon …

PALIKA
Guest

Churchill said in response to an intervention in the House of Commons: ” the Honuorable Member has the manners of a pig”. The Speaker reprimanded him and instructed him to withdraw the remark. Churchill responded: ” Very well, Mr Speaker, the Honourable Member has NOT got the manners of a pig”.

May I wish you a very good evening?

Whilst writing may I commend your contribution to Eva to review your suitability as a contributor?

Istvan
Guest
I wasn’t first absolutely baffled by Eva’s description of Gábor Vona’s evolved position on withdrawal of Hungary from NATO, and I am sure that Eva is accurate. I was left pondering this quote of Vona that Eva used: “it would (not) be a rational idea to leave it (NATO)… but we have to do everything in our power to avoid a conflict with Russia. Hungary must play the role of a bridge rather than of a satellite.” I believe based on creditable US intelligence that is being collected (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/russia/12103602/America-to-investigate-Russian-meddling-in-EU.html ) and pieces of which have been leaked to the US media Jobbik is fully penetrated by the Russians, if not controlled by the SVR-RF. Eva has discussed touched on this before, see http://hungarianspectrum.org/tag/pro-russian-media/ and even major US foreign policy journals have openly discussed this, see for example https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/russia-fsu/2014-03-25/putins-western-allies I believe Vona in relationship to his evolution on NATO is reflecting more directly the Russian strategy of destroying NATO from within, and the Trojan Horse strategy. Effectively both Jobbik and Fidesz adhere to the SVR strategy on NATO now. It is part of the Russian hybrid warfare strategy against both my country and NATO ( on the strategy see http://www.alexlanoszka.com/LanoszkaIAHybrid.pdf ).… Read more »
Istvan
Guest

Sorry for the auto correction- it should read – I was at first absolutely baffled.

webber
Guest

OT
My inbox is being bombarded by “posts,” allegedly by Eva. Six so far. The one I looked at was dated 2011. I guess hackers are trying something new.

Guest

Same with me – at first I feared it was my system’s fault. So what’s going on?

webber
Guest

clickbait, with something embedded to track those who click?

tappanch
Guest

Dunaujvaros by-election:

Democratic opposition combined : 422
Fidesz: 405
Jobbik 84 votes.

But the democratic opposition was split (DK: 241, MSzP: 97, PM: 84),
so actually, the Fidesz candidate has won.

The MSzP leadership should make some soul-searching.

http://index.hu/belfold/2016/06/05/nyert_a_fidesz_dunaujvarosban_a_dk_is_lemosta_az_mszp-t_-_a_dunaujvarosi_idokozi_valasztas_eredmenye/

tappanch
Guest

Turnout was 32%

tappanch
Guest

Correction: Jobbik 199 votes (19%)

PALIKA
Guest

Such depressing news. Unfortunately it reveals so much about the impact of fractionalised politics. It is difficult to say anything helpful, but I am sure the lessons will be learned.

webber
Guest

I hope you are right, but it’s not as if the need to put up one opposition candidate were news – if they haven’t learned the lesson by now, will they ever?

PALIKA
Guest

Eva, would you please review the exchanges with charliecharlieh as in my view they contain nationalist abuse and is patronising which as moderator you should consider whether he can properly continue on this blog

Guest

When Wolfi made a ‘Nationalist’ statement “……the Brits think they’re something special….” – you 100% agreed with him.

Hungarian hypocrite.

Get over yourself – it’s all part of the debate on here.

If you can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen.

PALIKA
Guest

Eva, charliecharlieh’s lates contribution is quite unacceptable and will consider how to follow this up unless you respond to my earlier message since I do not feel I should have to tolerate patronising, racist and nationalist insults from the man. I have now been called a Hungarian Hypocrite. Is it your intention to allow your blog to be used to patronise and to insult and to reduce the level of discussion to racist abuse?

webber
Guest

Palika,
Charlie called you Hungarian. That is not an insult. It is a statement of fact, and something you can be proud of.
The other words are a bit insulting, but they are directed to you, and let’s be honest, you were a bit insulting about Brits as a whole, weren’t you?

PALIKA
Guest

No Webber,

To be called a Hungarian is not an insult. There are two messages which used that description in an insulting and derogatory sense. The first is that as a Hungarian I should not express an opinion on the topic. This is clearly racist. The second is that I am a hypocrit. But he underscores this description with added emphasis that I am a Hungarian Hypocrite. Do you think that there is a difference between the expressions ” you are a liar” and the one ” you are a Jewish liar”.? The answer is pretty obvious. The addition of the description “Jewish or Hungarian is to add a racist context to the insult.

This blog seems to attract at least on contributor who undermines Eva’s invaluable work. She should be careful to stop it before it goes too far.

webber
Guest
Palika If I were British, I would vote for Brexit because of Hungary. If you wonder why I say that, read on: Because the EU’s toleration of the Hungarian government’s destruction of democracy demonstrates that the EU actually does not care about democracy, does not have democratic norms (Britain does). Because the EU’s toleration of, indeed complete ignorance of human rights abuses by the Hungarian government (abuses of Hungarian citizens), shows that the EU does not hold human rights norms to be important. Because the EU’s toleration of the Hungarian government’s abuses of the press shows that the EU does not hold press freedoms to be important. Because the EU’s toleration of, indeed participation in corruption shows that the EU does not hold corruption to be a problem (as long as it is not in the press!). Do you know about the EU arrest warrant? If an EU country (say Hungary) were to indict someone on false charges (say an opposition politician), and that person were to flee to another EU country, because of the EU arrest warrant that EU country would have to arrest that person and send him or her back to Hungary to face what everyone knows… Read more »
PALIKA
Guest

Webber, I understand. Thank you for spelling it out for me. TheEU is far from perfect as it is. We need to belong to it nevertheless to make an impact and to save us from economics catastrophy,

webber
Guest

We do, yes, but the British do not.

webber
Guest

P.S. Who needs to “make an impact”? That sounds a bit megalomaniac. I would just be happy if we all were become prosperous. I don’t want an EU that aspires to be a world power.

webber
Guest

to become prosperous (above)

Guest

Re: ‘I would just be happy if we all were become prosperous. I don’t want an EU that aspires to be a world power’

You know after reading this I would have to agree with a Roman historian that the founding of a city on the Tiber way back has something to teach us when it comes to the definition of being ‘prosperous’. For it would seem that the Romans understood that accepting the ‘other’ and bestowing ‘citizenship’ offered an inclusiveness which directed actions toward aiding not only the ‘Empire’ but themselves as well. In a sense, that Empire was a sort of an early EU and it was successful for quite a long time. And in the modern age it worked for another country.. the United States. Tough that one small city/country on the Danube has such a great fear of multiculturism. It will continually work to stop the country right in its tracks when it comes to European ‘vision’. Stuck dead in the waters. No tide at all to take them to farther shores.

PALIKA
Guest

Yes, to make an impact on what the EU does and achieves. Properity does not happen by itself

Guest

Petofi!!

Calling Petofi!

webber
Guest

Yes – where is Petofi? Haven’t seen him for awhile. said he was going to start by having some sort of sandwich at his favourite deli. Corned beef has been the downfall of many a good man. I suppose he’s enjoying the fleshpots of Canada too much now to be bothered with things in Hungary.

Guest

Jobbik and LMP the enemies of capitalism? For all the sense that this makes, they might as well be the enemies of the law of gravity or go back to live in caves in a state of nature.

Guest

Vona is trying the square the circle, which however has so far defeated all who tried it.

I think that it is just about inevitable that the visceral Jew- and Gypsy-haters in Jobbik will either separate out and form a new National Socialist (Nazi) party of their own, or push Vona out of the leadership.

Jew- and Gypsy-hating is a profoundly significant and deeply rooted component of the sense of identity of the 20-25% of Hungarians that form the potential support base of Jobbik, and with his sweetness and light ‘cuki’-campaign Vona is chopping off the branch he is sitting on ,high up in the tree.

He is therefore inevitably heading for a Humpty-Dumpty-like fall that could easily destroy his political career on the far right, unless what he is really angling for is an ultimate union with Fidesz and then a Trojan Horse-like takeover of Orbán’s turf and leadership position.

At which point however, Orbán would eat Vona for breakfast.

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