The ethos of Hungarian football

The current Hungarian political landscape is a wasteland. Almost nothing is happening. Half of the government seems to be in France, and the rest of the country talks of nothing else but the Hungarian national team’s surprisingly good showing at the European Championship. Since 1972 no Hungarian national team had been good enough to even participate in these games, so the national delirium is understandable. Today I’m going to look into some possible explanations for the sorry state of the sport in Hungary in the last thirty years or so.

Hungary was once a powerhouse of football, but today economic realities make it highly unlikely that it will ever return to its former glory. Hungary simply doesn’t have the kind of money necessary to finance a top-flight team. Each player has his own price and, according to Andreas Möller, the recently hired assistant to Coach Bernd Storck, the market value of the Hungarian national team today is the lowest of all the teams playing in France. One reason for this low number is that a fair number of the athletes play for Hungarian and Polish clubs, which are lesser known and valued and hence pay lower salaries. (Or they pay lower salaries, hence they are lesser known and valued.)

But it seems that there are other problems in the world of Hungarian football that have less to do with money and more to do with the circumstances created by the leaders in the sport. I read an interview with a player who felt so neglected in his Hungarian club that he packed up, moved to Austria, and today is a member of the Austrian national team. For one reason or another, his coach in Hungary didn’t appreciate his talents.

One shouldn’t think that this young man’s case was unique. A couple of months ago Storck, the new coach of the Hungarian team, made the mistake of asking why a certain young player from the Puskás Academy was being ignored when he is very talented. Storck was immediately rebuked by the coach of the Academy, who announced that all decisions are his responsibility and he doesn’t appreciate advice, even if it comes from the coach of the national team. László Kleinheisler, the hero of the Hungary-Norway match, was a member of Videoton, where he was completely neglected although again he is apparently a very talented player. To everybody’s amazement Storck picked him to be a member of the national squad. Criticism immediately followed this “rash decision” on Storck’s part.

Over the years, reading the Hungarian media, I couldn’t help noticing that the coaches of the national team came and went with frightening frequency. Today I sat down and counted: nine coaches in ten years. One of these, Sándor Egervári (2010-213), gave an interview to Sport TV in October 2015, shortly after Storck was hired and had just made the decision to change the entire staff he inherited from his predecessor. Egervári said in the interview that “we trained [the players] for second place because for us second place meant moving further up.” Well, I don’t know about football, but in other sports the coach wants his team to win and not be satisfied with second place. In the interview he had to admit that “unfortunately in the last half year” when he was the coach, the Hungarian team lost its second position.

In the rest of the interview he expressed his misgivings about Bernd Storck who, in his estimation, is a divisive personality, which will be detrimental to the squad’s cohesion. He called Storck’s decision to hire an entirely new training staff “horrifying” because the old staff “knew the circumstances that exist in Hungary” and they were the ones who could help the players. He went on and on until it finally became evident that what Egervári really objected to was that the new coach was not a Hungarian. Someone coming from the outside cannot get to know the players, he said, adding that “we are Hungarians in an emotional sense” and thus, I gather, a German will never understand the Hungarian psyche. Never mind that the mostly Hungarian coaches in the last thirty years hadn’t achieved anything. The final message of Egervári was to “go with the flow,” don’t change anything, permanence is something to be cherished. But the trouble is that in this context permanence meant failure.

Storck’s daring moves and his assessments of player talent were largely responsible for the achievements of the Hungarian national team, but the second man who should be applauded is Sándor Csányi, president of the Hungarian Football Association, who backed Storck up through these last few months. He told Storck that he had a free hand in deciding with whom he wants to work. He also defended the coach against the leadership of the Puskás Academy.

In October, right after Egervári’s attack on him, Storck explained his decision to change the entire staff only a few months before the beginning of the games. He explained that the members of the old staff worked only half-time, and Storck is apparently the kind of guy who works 24/7. Also, he had his own ideas about the game and needed people who could understand and share his vision. As for the risks, he said there are times when one has to take risks. A few days ago he again elaborated on the lack of daring of Hungarian football players as well as their lack of self-confidence and a will to win. “It is hard to convince the players that they should raise their heads, look their adversaries in the eye, and be proud that they wear this uniform.” Just as we heard Egervári say that he would be satisfied with second place, apparently leaders in the Hungarian world of football kept telling Storck and Möller before the game against Norway to “play for a tie.”

Zoltán Stieber celebrating his goal at the game against Austria

Zoltán Stieber celebrating his goal at the game against Austria

I’m not sure, but I have the feeling that Storck is paying a lot more attention to analyzing the techniques of the adversaries than his predecessors did. He believes that there is never enough study of earlier games. Each player receives a detailed account of the strengths and weaknesses of their adversaries. The staff works out a complete plan for the coming game. With a part-time staff I wonder whether such thorough prepping was possible. Most likely not.

Of course, one swallow doth not a summer make, but Storck and Möller are committed to staying in Hungary until at least 2018. The question is how hard a time they will have changing the fundamentals which, like so many other things, would need a total makeover.

June 21, 2016
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Guest

London Calling!

“Aim to come second – or a tie”!!

Incredible!

And the old coaches only worked half the time?

I don’t ‘do’ football because I don’t have a low enough IQ.

But I sure know that that is a recipe for losing.

Must be the historical inherent element in the Hungarian psyche – losers!

I didn’t watch England’s last game – or any! – but I understand that England may play Hungary in the next round?

Bring it on! It would be worth watching my first ever football game to see Orban crushed. Actually it’ll be my third in a lifetime if I don’t fall asleep but it’ll seem like it.

And we may have two other opportunities with Wales and Northern Ireland too!

Imagine if Hungary go through! It’d be like Ferenc Puskas all over again.

For once in my life I might have to watch several matches.

If I don’t fall asleep!

And then there’s Brexit!

But at least that’s settled! Orban has tipped the scales for exit with his stupid advert and Choo-Choo train shenanigans – 30 passengers a day? What a hoot!

I just love the reaction to one of those “let’s send a message to Brussels” adverts!

“Segítség!”

Classic!

webber
Guest

Well, I’m rooting for the Hungarian team.

I don’t see supporting that team as support for Orban.

I don’t assume supporting earlier teams meant support for Kadar. Or for Rakosi, either.

petofi
Guest

Obviously you’re not aware of the multifarious ways Orban can feed off of Hungarian soccer success.

Guest

This reminds me right away of ‘church and state’. Two different things. They should have space. No ‘white on rice’ attachment.

LwiiH
Guest
Did see the end of the Austrian game and all of the Icelandic game. You could see almost immediately that this is a well coached team. You can see that Storck has taken the talent he has and mixed it with a system that resulted in a team that plays well above their pay grade. They are still not at the level of the upper tier teams but I think they’d hold their own against them quite nicely. Iceland has done the same thing so it was no accident that they were able to create the chances they did. You could see that the Icelandic system was frustrating the players which lead to a few mental breakdowns (bad penalties, bad passes, bad shots taken) which allowed the Icelandic’s to generate chances. But without that bad penalty call Hungary would have won this game. I can imagine Storck will be talking about the mental breakdowns because the higher caliber teams that Hungary will face in the next rounds will be a *lot* more frustrating to play against. I guess the other Hungarian coaches should be looking over their shoulder now because Storck will have a new best friend who didn’t spend… Read more »
Guest

Awwwww! Shucks!

Alex Kuli
Guest

“A few days ago [Storck] again elaborated on the lack of daring of Hungarian football players as well as their lack of self-confidence and a will to win. ‘It is hard to convince the players that they should raise their heads, look their adversaries in the eye, and be proud…'”
Storck “believes that there is never enough study of earlier games. Each player receives a detailed account of the strengths and weaknesses of their adversaries. The staff works out a complete plan for the coming game.”

Dear Eva – In these paragraphs, you could easily be talking about the shortcomings of Hungary’s non-Jobbik opposition. Especially the importance of analyzing the other team’s game plan. Whenever anyone (including myself) makes such a suggestion to anti-Fidesz politicians, they usually get a roll of the eyes and “you don’t understand the Hungarian mentality,” or some such.

Even commenters on this site have come up with limp-wristed responses such as, “there is no reason for us to be doing exactly what Fidesz does.” Perhaps true. But there is one thing Fidesz is doing that you aren’t: Winning.

Member

“Alex Kuli”: “there is one thing Fidesz is doing that you aren’t: Winning”

By cheating. Copy them?

Alex Kuli
Guest

Hardly. Knowing the enemy’s game plan and working to derail it, or at least mitigate its effects, is known as “hard-nosed politicking,” not “cheating.”

webber
Guest

Oh, I don’t know. The opposition has won a passel of by-elections since 2014, and won a few now elections before 2010.
Now as to who can’t learn – Winning an election is something Lajos Bokros never did in his life.

pappp
Guest

Medián – perhaps the most reliable pollster company – says that Fidesz has more voters than all other parties put together.

Fidesz actually increased its popularity – and that was before the European Cup which promptly silenced those critical of the stadium building mania.

2/3s of people say Fidesz would win the elections.

This doesn’t look to me as though the opposition would be in a great shape. And the middle of the cycle is when the government is the most unpopular, the goodies will start arriving from 2017.

http://index.hu/belfold/2016/06/23/fidesz_mszp_lmp_jobbik_dk_median_kozvelemeny-kutatas/

Guest

So Hungarians get what they want/need:
Panem et circenses …
Zsíros kenyér for the poor …
Meat and vegetables not necessary – not affordable for many people on less than 100 000 HUF a month!
If they’re happy with that, no problem!

pappp
Guest

Yes, they are happy, at least happy enough apparently to vote for Fidesz. The principle worked in Rome and it works now. Especially outside of Budapest. Football is also intimately linked with tribalism and nationalism and guess which party gains if people are more enthusiastic about being Hungarian? Rationalist, technocratic, pro-migrant Left or the nationalist, football-crazy Fidesz?

webber
Guest

wolfi
I wouldn’t say that.
What pappp didn’t mention is that the largest group of all is the group of those unwilling to name their preferred party, or those who say they “don’t know.” Add to that the people who lie – and these people are mostly in the Fidesz numbers (why would a person lie that they are going to support MSZP when they won’t? Nothing to gain).

Once you’ve digested that you’ll understand why no public opinion poll taken since 2014 has been able to predict the lost elections Fidesz has seen in by-elections, which led to the loss of the 2/3 majority (and then some).

Pollsters in Hungary are now admitting they cannot know how any election will turn out. People are closing up, and lying to such a degree that nobody knows what will happen in upcoming elections.

For sure, everyone is happy about the football results, though. I include myself in that “everyone.” Go Hungary!

Julius
Guest

So what ???this success is more worth then any other bigoted issue ,it’s balsam for the soul of a glourious football nation!!and people will be thankful ,,
Ps: we very happy whith zsiros kenyér ,that’s why we don’t look like Canadian balloons!!

Guest

You’re a funny troll, Julius!

Re “Canadian balloons”:
Do you know the definition of a real Hungarian:
It’s easier to jump over him than to walk around him …
Hungary is one of the most obese nations – but since you don’t live here, you never see them …

webber
Guest

Eva, when you wrote – ‘apparently leaders in the Hungarian world of football kept telling Storck and Möller before the game against Norway to “play for a tie.”’ – and wrote about objections to a certain player whom Storck had selected, and about Storck firing a lot of staff, something came to mind.
It’s something everyone here who knows anything about Hungarian football understood something that is called “bunda” in Hungarian
Storck could make millions of Euros by agreeing to lose in the next match. He and the players could have made millions by losing against Iceland, too. Apparently Storck wasn’t even willing to try to provide a “tie” (I just bet the offer – the first offer anyway – was for a loss, really).

Guaranteeing a victory is impossible. Guaranteeing a loss is very easy.

Hungarian coaches and players have been doing that for decades, and it’s a very good thing that the Hungarian national team has a foreigner, someone not raised in that system.

Guest

Apparently it’s worse in the Italian football universe.

Shocking.

Do you think it’s endemic in English football? There are occasional suspicions.

A Hungarian once told me that he watches only English football – because the outcome of Hungarian matches is a foregone conclusion – fixed.

What’s the point of all those stadiums? And now Hungary has ‘got this far’ we can expect more and more bigger stadiums? Empty for most of the time?

Presumably, even now, the Hungarian Euro matches can be thrown – and presumably now for bigger bucks?

You’ve knocked the wind out of my sails!

Orban’s whole football edifice is built on very dodgy moving sand.

webber
Guest

It def. happens in English football. A decade ago, for example, Man. United played and lost a friendly against a Hungarian team in Hungary (Fradi? can’t recall.) That match was thrown. No question.

Guest

Have to hand it to the English. They met, engaged and were educated in great football talent. They acknowledged it. And now have one of the top football leagues in the world….at bottom thanks to Magyarorszag. And the latter like Dylan , not realizing what he had in the palm of his hand , ‘threw it all away’. Really fhe Magyars should get royalties from the Premiership. ..😎

Guest

Long and Wasted Years – Desolation Row!

Guest

Spot on cch. Spot on.

Guest

I love watching football in the more important European games and especially the World Cup!

Am on holiday in the countryside now, with friends, and we have booked a table in in our hotel, right in frontof the big screen, to watch the game. What makes me sad is that despite being Hungarian, we will be rooting for Portugal, because we do not wish to put another “featherin the cap” of Orbán.

What a sad state of affairs – brought about by Orbán, a nasty man with nasty ideas – when such a harmless pursuit as watching the beautiful game of football is tainted by political nonsense to the extent that one does not even want to root for the local team!

webber
Guest

I think you might re-think that.
People rooted for the “aranycsapat” despite the horrors of Rákosi’s rule, despite the fact that most people hated Rákosi.

Rooting for the Hungarian team is not the same as supporting Orbán.

Even Fradi supporters know that:

Guest

Amazing!

This seems very reminiscent of Ceausescu’s last speech – heavily heckled. Did you see it?

It is quite a spectacle – presumably it’s hostile mostly?

My partner’s at work so I can’t get her interpretation, yet.

But it’s certainly impressively disrespectful!!

Yay!

Guest

How can they be so disrespectful to Omniscient Omnipotent Orban – when he’s wasted so much money on their sport!

Where’s their gratitude!

Guest

The body language is amazing too.

“I’m going to complete this despite you bastards!”

Guest

Nicolae Ceaușescu’s last speech is so similar – when you don’t understand the language!

https://youtu.be/TcRWiz1PhKU

webber
Guest

It’s very hostile!
Fidesz is hated in Budapest, as I’ve said repeatedly. Even football supporters who were “given” a new stadium, and whose club is headed by a Fidesz man (Kubatov) hate Fidesz.
Now we’ll get some lines from Fideszniks about how popular Fidesz is in the countryside. Well, that’s no longer true either, I can tell you.

pappp
Guest

The question is given all those tens of millions or more these footballers will receive from Orban (ie the taxpayers) will they endorse Fidesz during the elections?

A few nice remarks here and there (Lokál or TV2 or Nők Lapja or Story) will be enough.

Rákosi and the communists were amateurs compared to Orban and the Fidesz.

webber
Guest

Pappp, you’re wrong again.
Rákosi had the “aranycsapat” and yet what happened in 1956?
Fradi got a new stadium and lots and lots of money, and just look at what Fradi supporters think of Orbán. They hate him. Deeply.
Why do they hate him? Think about everything else that is wrong with the country (health care, salaries, education, salaries, the state of roads, salaries, unemployment, salaries, homeless people, salaries… did I mention salaries?)
Fidesz has lost Budapest and will lose the rest of the country too, mark my words.
Football supporters have to work and live, too.

webber
Guest

PALIKA
Guest

You are not comparing like with like. Rakosi, Gero and Kadar had the backing of Moscow and the Red Army. Although Kadar sought and received popular support in the country his rule would have survived without it. Orban cannot.

webber
Guest

Pappp is acting like a typical Fidesz troll again with the “they will win”, and Orban is so clever line. Looks like Stevan Harnad was right.

pappp
Guest

Don’t underestimate modern media’s power over average folks.

The better comparison isn’t Rákosi but Putin or even Jelcin who at one point had single digit “popularity” and in a few months he was reelected.

You know that from Népszabadság to ATV Fidesz is there in the background and I won’t mention TV2 and the rest. This is power.

Most sportspeople are pro-Fidesz and certainly not left-wing in attitude.

From Egérke to Kokó many celebrity sportsmen endorsed Fidesz and if Fidesz can control the footballers or other stars somehow, and there are few more corrupt segments in Hungarian society than sports, then Fidesz will gain a lot. Like it or not. Instead (just as Obama or Clinton do it with celebrities) the Hungarian left-wing politicians should look for celebrities (not already thought of as leftists) who would come out and openly endorse them. This counts and Fidesz know this.

webber
Guest

That confirmed it. You are a Fidesznik.

If propaganda meant all, tell me this, how did MDF win the first free elections?

pappp
Guest

Please. Why is it so contentious to say that media has power? Sure, the rule of diminishing returns applies in media too, but wasn’t Tony Blair very thankful for Murdoch after the Sun endorsed him? But all other British politicians coveted the “friendship” of Rebekah Brooks and others. Were they all crazy?

I don’t think that between let’s say 1988 and 1990 many celebrities came out endorsing MSZP or Munkáspárt (which still received over 10% between them of the party list votes) or that MSZP (or MSZMP before it) carried out a propaganda strategy during those years as concerted, segmented and sophisticated as Fidesz does it now. Dictatorships evolve and learn from past mistakes. I don’t deny that the opposition may win without media support, but it certainly starts from a hugely disadvantageous position. And please stop calling me a Fidesznik. The issue isn’t whether I am a Fidesznik or not (I’m emphatically not) but rather why you are so obsessed with lurking fideszniks? You simply call everybody a troll who doesn’t happen to agree with you on any issue.

Alex Kuli
Guest

“You simply call everybody a troll who doesn’t happen to agree with you on any issue.”
Pappp – You nailed it. Several commenters on this site refuse to engage in rational debate, even though they are clearly intelligent enough to do so. They simply adopt Orban’s approach of “everyone who has a different point of view is the enemy,” even if the “enemy” is actually on their side.
In their lust to destroy Orban, they become Orban. End result: They create new Fidesz voters.

webber
Guest

Okay, Alex, watch what Pappp writes (under a number of pseudonyms), and let me know what you think in a month.

pappp
Guest

I just note that of course you didn’t address my points. Never mind. I think you hate me because with this impotence the Hungarian left-wing opposition has limited chances to win (in an anyway rigged system), let alone govern and I dare to say so. Orban will not leave at his own volition, somebody’s got to defeat him, you know this well. The only question is who? These guys?
http://444.hu/2016/06/20/megvan-az-mszp-uj-szlogenje-a-masik-ember-partjan

okan szeretnék nem észrevenni a másik embert, pedig mások szemében ők sem többek, mint egy másik ember.” “Sokan szeretnék nem észrevenni a másik embert, pedig mások szemében ők sem többek, mint egy másik ember.” “Sokan szeretnék nem észrevenni a másik embert, pedig mások szemében ők sem többek, mint egy másik ember.” “

webber
Guest

Why should I say anything at all to your “points”? I am not a left-winger in case you’ve forgotten. We’ve already clarified this – Ön a szélsőbaloldali.

pappp
Guest

The szélsőbaloldai fideszes you wanted to say. I thought that if there is an argument parties to the debate address each others’s points. Instead, you just call me a fidesznik or extreme left-winger. But I agree that this is much easier than refuting my arguments.

webber
Guest

But I did refute your “arguments,” repeatedly. You noticed that from time to time, for example when you wrote: “I don’t deny that the opposition may win without media support…” You just haven’t been reading carefully.

Now, as to media in, say, 1938 and media now, the current evidence is that controlling the masses through the media in the 1930s was much, much more effective than it is now. People are more savvy, it seems. I can refer you to research on this, if you like.

Koko and “other celebrities.” The latest I checked, Koko was denying he ever was a Fidesz man – to his shame, I must say. If he wants us to believe him, he shouldn’t deny what we all remember.

And I seem to see other celebrities leaving the ship.

It is going down, sooner or later you see. Either Orban comes out with open dictatorship, or he loses power. He can’t win every election.

petofi
Guest

Shame on you, Webber.
What Rakosi would or wouldn’t do with a soccer success is not what we all know Orban will make of soccer successes–propaganda for his mad running of the country.

webber
Guest

Shame on me, for what?
For pointing out soccer success need not mean Orban’s success?
If you argue it must, you’re taking a Fidesznik line. Shame on whom?

Reality Check
Guest

Orban controls enough of what goes on Hungary, I am not going to let him control how I feel about Hungary winning tonight. Go Hungary!

My liberal Hungarian and expat friends will be out in one of Budapest’s kerts tonight watching the game and cheering for Hungary.

Reality Check
Guest

Instead of seeing it as another point of division, this is how one of the pro-refugee NGO’s is using football fever in Hungary in a positive way. Don’t let Orban set the frame.

Free kick everyone!
This is the title asked us for mini-football tournament, which pleased we said yes. I am happy because even though we belong to different groups, but such as are common to us all people are equally important and valuable. We believe in equality, is a diverse, inclusive and accepting Hungary. That is why we will play together on 26 June, refugees, immigrants, the homeless, Roma, all kinds of people.
When?
2016 June 26 14: 00-19: 00
Where?
Fido Park (between 8th district, on the road Fiume and carton Street)

We invite you too! Come on you, play football, cheer, spend an afternoon with us! Show that the scapegoat sharing and training policy is not working!
https://www.facebook.com/events/299422287066736/

Guest

As someone who loves the ‘beautiful game’ keep on dribbling! And keep on ‘passing and moving!’ Enjoy it to the hilt. And besides it keeps the ‘ver’ going!

Guest

Our little Orbi has his chest puffed out quite enough as it is, so , no, I do not agree that rooting for the Hungarian team does not have a knock-on effect on our tin-pot dictator and on Hungary in general, and I will be watching the next match and rooting for the opposing team again.

I will root for a Hungarian team when Hungary begins to resemble a normal democracy, with rule of law, transparency and with consequences faced when corruption is exposed. Until then, there is nothing to be proud of here apart from those of us who have enough sense to wish an end to this appaling excuse for a government, footbal stadiums, et al.

eszti
Guest

I don’t think that money is the reason why footballers are not great in Hungary – look at the number of kids playing cricket in India, or football in Brazil, and the talent pool that’s there as a result…

Tyrker
Guest

This is a fair analysis – the only thing I would add is that all this much-needed change started not with the arrival of Storck but with that of Dárdai; another trainer with a German mindset, so to speak (he’s coaching Hertha BSC, a Berlin-based club). Dárdai was always meant to be an interim manager for the Hungarian national team, but he laid the groundwork upon which his former mentor, Bernd Storck, could build a winning team. In fact, it was Dárdai who recommended Storck to the leaders of MLSZ.

Joe Simon
Guest

HAJRÁ MAGYAORORSZÁG.

Joe Simon
Guest

HAJRÁ MAGYARORSZÁG.

petofi
Guest

No, you had it right the first time:

HAJRA MAGYAROROSZORSZAG!

Guest
Re: ‘…….Magyaroroszorszag’ Speaking of ‘orosz’, those invaders really messed up a good thing, eh? They were ‘King Midas in reverse’ when it came to the arany csapat and Magyar football. It was too bad that many players who left after the tanks didn’t come here to be the initial vanguard in presenting the game to potential and talented players. Even if it was considered the ‘immigrant’ game at least we would have learned from the best and kick-started a program for excellence in the game. As it is we are playing catchup and it has been a long haul. It remains to be seen if Viktor who indeed basks in his political success can reprise the great success and achievements of the ‘arany csapat’. If anything though it would appear that ‘his’ efforts are based primarily on the quest for ”arany’ and aggrandizing the Magyar nationalist character at the same time. If Viktor as a Football Augustus thinks he can build something quickly he will be mistaken. For we all know the adage, Rome wasnt built in a day’. He ‘loves’ the game alright but not like the Puskas’ , Kocsis’, Hidegkuti’s et al when they were taking apart opposing… Read more »
Guest

And Magyarorszag will be meeting Ronaldo et al in a few hours. Curious if Storck will ‘park the bus’. Or maybe we will see that ‘will to win’ which is another style of football when the big boys play. So good luck Magyarorszag. This is why you play. It’s ‘prime time’.

PALIKA
Guest

Yes, it will be a very interesting tactical decision this afternoon for Storck. This is nothing to do with the will to win. It is based on the realistic assessment by the manager of the strengths and weaknesses of his team and of Portugal. This Portuguese side is not one of the greats. The star of the show Ronaldo does not like his team mates and hates playing with them. The Portugese manager might drop him to get a more coherent team on the field. From the Hungarian point of view a draw would be perfectly acceptable. “Parking the bus” is ok provided you have a sufficiently reliable defensive team. Arsenal in the English Premiership never does it because one the team’s recurring weaknesses is its Defence since Viera left the team. The more brutal North of England teams which have huge and very physical players can employ the tactic more readily.

My impression of the Hungarian team from the last two games is that it might just work to “ptb”.

Good luck

Guest

And the Magyars have moved on. Kudos to Zoltan bagging his goal. The veteran came through. We saw an open game with 6 goals. If there was a bus it looked like it was speeding ahead and really moving for Storck’s team. They did well playing attacking football.

And Gabor will get his famous pants washed and ready as well as the rest of team for the Group E runner up on the 26th.

Member

Well, it is certainly not underOrban’s Hungarian trainers that lead the Hungarian soccer group to this position. Orban had to hire a foreign trainer, and funny enough the ultra-right Jobbik is also embracing this. It actually makes me laugh. Hungary id for Hungarians, except let foreigners train our soccer team. I wish they would implement the same practice in the parliament, and then maybe we would get some qualified politicians replace the team of bozos that are currently sitting there (Orban, Kover, Lazar, Ader, Rogan)!
Hara foreign trainer! Show the Hungarian bozos how it has to be done! Orban watch and learn what real professionals can do for “foci”! Real professionals could do the same to Hungary!

Jean P.
Guest

Orban has a foreign trainer: Finkelstein. Without him, he would have been nowhere.

PALIKA
Guest

I hope you all watched and enjoyed what clearly was the best game of the competition so far. Good result for Hungary..They did not park the bus, so I was wrong. The want to win manager got it right. Do not worry that this will please OV. When I was a child I was not interested in whether the Puskas led great, great team’s successes pleased the monster Rakosi and his vile clique. I just watching them when I could.

Member

Let’s hire qualified politicians from outside Hungary to replace Orban and the others. You see under good “management” what people are capable of?

PALIKA
Guest

There is much in what you write Some1. Hungary was usually better managed when run by others. Austrians, Russians, Turks. It maybe too late for that now.

Julius
Guest

This is orbans achievement!!and the future of Hungarian football is bright!!we can not thank enough for this!!everyone behind the scenes and the actully the squad!!
That’s the truth even you guys like or not!

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Of course, O sent all those footballers away to the German Bundesliga …

The most successful ones even have German names!

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