The leaders of Visegrád 4 meet with Angela Merkel

The European Union has gone through some rough times in the last year and a half. The Brexit decision certainly shook an EU already battered by the influx of almost two million refugees and immigrants. But at least the British departure, whenever it actually happens, will not undermine the foundations of the European Union. Some commentators, in fact, think that further integration, which they consider a necessity for the long-term survival of the EU, can be more easily achieved in the absence of a reluctant United Kingdom, which in the past consistently opposed any changes to the already very loose structure of the Union.

Closer cooperation would have been necessary even without the refugee crisis, but the presence of so many asylum seekers–mostly in Greece, Italy, and Germany–makes a common policy and joint effort by the member states a must. Thus, Chancellor Angela Merkel decided to launch a series of consultations with European leaders. To date she has talked with 17 prime ministers.

Her first trip was to Italy where she, Matteo Renzi, and François Hollande met first on the Italian Aircraft Carrier Giuseppe Garibaldi and later visited the grave of Altiero Spinelli on the Island of Ventotene. There, while a prisoner of Benito Mussolini’s regime, he composed the Ventotene Manifesto “For a Free and United Europe,” which envisaged a European federation of states. After this trip Merkel continued to meet with leading politicians. From newspaper reports it looks as if they more or less agreed that greater cooperation and a common security apparatus are necessary to handle the refugee crisis. Just this past weekend she met with the prime ministers of Austria, Croatia, Slovenia, and Bulgaria. According to Miro Cerar, the Slovenian prime minister, “there was no great difference of opinion between the German chancellor and her visitors.”

Only the so-called Visegrád 4 countries are unmovable in their opposition to common action and sharing the refugee burden. Merkel traveled to Warsaw to meet the four recalcitrant prime ministers. Although Hungarians are apt to think that it is their prime minister, Viktor Orbán, who creates the most trouble within the European Union, this might not be the case. Orbán is belligerent mostly at home. Once he gets to Brussels or, in this case, to Warsaw, he remains rather subdued. His Slovak and Czech colleagues, on the other hand, were widely quoted in the western media, not in the best light. Fico, for example, said that he would “never bring even a single Muslim into his country.” Bohuslav Sobotka of the Czech Republic, although more tempered, announced that he doesn’t want a “large Muslim community—given the problems we are seeing.” Fico, just before his meeting with Merkel, had paid a visit to Moscow, after which he renewed his call for the European Union to end sanctions against Russia. The Polish foreign minister accused Germany of selfishness and an unwillingness to compromise. Poland’s deputy foreign minister, Konrad Szymański, after the meeting hit back at Angela Merkel for criticizing those member states that are refusing to give refugee protection to Muslims.

Photo by Rafal Gruz MTI/PAP

Photo by Rafal Gruz MTI/PAP

Viktor Orbán’s views didn’t receive much coverage, but at least one of the four propositions he arrived with in Warsaw–the creation of a common European army–has enjoyed some limited support. Whether the creation of a European army is his idea or not is debatable. Orbán did talk about such an army in July in Tusnádfürdő/Băile Tușnad, but apparently already in May The Financial Times reported a German plan to set up such an army. And Zsolt Gréczy of Demokratikus Koalíció claims that the idea was actually stolen from Ferenc Gyurcsány, who suggested the creation of such an army a year ago.

The reception of the other three suggestions remains unknown. Let’s start with the most weighty one which would, if accepted, reinvent the European Union by practically annulling the European Commission. To quote it verbatim, first in the original Hungarian: “az Európai Tanács vezesse és csak ő vezesse az Európai Uniót. Az Európai Bizottság a politikai szerepjátszást fejezze be.” (The European Council should lead, and it should be the only one that leads the European Union. The European Commission should end its political pretensions.) I suspect that Viktor Orbán never presented this idea in such stark terms to Angela Merkel during their talks because, as an eagle-eyed friend of mine discovered, the English translation of the above passage on the official government website reads as follows: Viktor Orbán “went on to say that institutions such as the European Council and the European Commission should go back to fulfilling their ‘original roles’.” The first one for Hungarian consumption, the second for foreigners.

His next suggestion was economic in nature. Orbán suddenly discovered the benefits of austerity. This is quite a switch from his position six years ago, when as the new prime minister he visited Brussels in the hope of getting permission to continue running a 7% deficit instead of having to bring the deficit down below 3%. Now he is a firm believer in a tight budget, which made Hungary, in his opinion, an economic success. I’m not quite sure why Orbán felt the need to lobby for the continuation of this economic policy which, according to many economists, is responsible for Europe’s sluggish economic growth. I suspect that he might be responding to a perceived movement toward an economic policy that would loosen the current restrictions for the sake of more robust economic growth. Merkel has been talking a lot lately about higher living standards that would make the European Union more attractive to Europeans.

Finally, Orbán insists that the European Union should keep pouring money into the East European countries as part of the cohesion program, which in his estimation “has been a well-proven policy.” Sure thing. Hungary’s questionable economic success is due largely to the billions of euros Budapest receives from Brussels. Naturally, he wants to keep the present agrarian subsidies as well, a program severely criticized by many experts.

Whatever the prime ministers of the Visegrád 4 countries told Angela Merkel, it didn’t sway her from her original plans for solving the crisis. It doesn’t matter what Fico said, Merkel thinks “it is wrong that some say we generally don’t want Muslims in our country, regardless of whether there’s a humanitarian need or not.” She keeps insisting that “everyone must do their part” and that “a common solution must be found.”

Meanwhile Russian propaganda against Merkel is growing. Just today sputniknews.com portrayed her as the chief obstacle to an understanding between Moscow and the European Union. According to Russian political analysts, “Merkel is a supporter of the idea that it is Germany’s natural role to become the leader of Eastern Europe … and to drive the economic development of these countries,” naturally in line with German interests. According to these political scientists, Washington is actively working to turn Germany into a stronghold of anti-Russian influence, which “means that we will have to encounter a Germany that is strengthened not only in economic and political terms but perhaps militarily as well.”

In adopting an anti-German policy, the Visegrád 4 countries are implicitly allying themselves with Russia. I think they are playing with fire.

August 29, 2016
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petofi
Guest

Isn’t it strange for the Poles to be promoting a pro-Russian policy?

Guest
Perhaps not just like its partners looking East. If we entertain the perception that they want to be safe and and protected and consequently insulated from global issues then the rationale can be understood. And why not? The history of Russia shows that they will do whatever has to be done in difficult situations. Don’t they keep their people safe and sound so they can sleep at night without ‘extraneous activity going around them? And the calculus never eliminates force as a solution. Eastern Europe has seen this relentlessly. Plain as day in the psyche. And ‘freedom?’ Are you kidding me? I’d think with some of the countries they have taken it as the notion that it’s almost the right to get a ‘pension’ even in this late post-war period viewing it as a sort of compensation for all the trouble the West has heaped on it in the last century and today. All in all they know what works to keep their countries going so goodbye Merkel, Germany, the EU and the US. Get out and the horses you rode in on. Democratic societies make their heads swoon since, from their point of view, problems never get solved. There… Read more »
Orionpax
Guest

Poles even backstab commonwealth immigrant, by refer them as uncultured and uncivilised. Ironically those commonwealth peoples ancestors fought against the Nazis and Japanese which eventually gave the freedom the poles are enjoying now.

Observer
Guest

The Poles are not, but just letting Fico and Orban play around. There’s no way to sell pro Russian policies there.

pappp
Guest

I can report that the taxi driver who drove me to downtown Budapest today was very-very anti-Merkel, he was also anti-EU.

I find it a bit strange that Merkel is hated so much and is faulted for her purported strategy of making Germany a leading nation — she is very inconsequential, very weak, always wavering, can never decide (see the expression ‘merkeln’). Her domestic image is anything but that of a “decider”.

Apparently Orban, Putin et al hope that her successor (whoever she/he might be) will be even more impotent, even less charismatic – perhaps more corrupt or just pro-Russian.

I guess they also hope that with a new Chancellor they will buy time. Merkel already knows Putin, Orban well but any new German politician will need 2-3 years (by which time there may be a new election in Germany with yet another Chancellor) and during that time they can reset the situation and fool the new administration yet again.

webber
Guest

Presenting a taxi driver as an accurate reflection of public opinion… That is so 1980s, it’s painful.

pappp
Guest

I think it’s actually very 1990’s (Thomas Friedman).

Literally minutes before I opened today’s post I had to hear about why Merkel is so terrible (“she is a woman and they are terrible politicians, she used to be a research scholar who do nothing useful” etc.) so this is why I thought I mentioned this.

I don’t think this driver was representative, but you have to know that many people dislike her in Hungary and we have ample representative evidence for that. I think last week polls were posted at this blog showing she is probably as unpopular in Hungary as in Greece – which reminds me of the media’s and the propaganda’s power which I think you underestimate. Re propaganda Orban scored yet again as he forced Spéder to sell his media empire (including Nemzeti Sport, Nők Lapja, the regional dailies etc.) directly under Fidesz’ control and index.hu is also hanging by a thread. Mind you index was owned by Wallis (a group of pro-Socialist bunch of oligarchs) at one point but as we know the leftists never had a vision about the importance of media so they sold it to fidesznik oligarchs, they just didn’t care.

Guest

Of course Orbán wants the EU to keep pouring billions of EU subsidies into Central European Member-States so he and his cronies can embezzle more money. I cannot help but wonder what OLAF, the EU anti-fraud office, does about it, not much sadly.

bimbi
Guest
Just like Britain facing a Brexit situation that neither the government (nor anyone else) understands leaving PM May groping for a policy, so the EU is tentatively examining how it might better face the uncertain future. The idea of “closer union” is favoured by some nations, e.g. Italy, but the difficulty of achieving consensus on such a major issue is enormous. Hungary’s role as dissenter-in-chief (the boil on the back-side of the EU) has now spread to Slovakia, Czechia and Poland and to make any progress at all, that group must be either persuaded or circumvented. My current reading of the biography of Winston Churchill by Roy Jenkins reminds me fervently to wish for a re-invigorated, united, just and progressive Europe. Alas, the “Gimme Now!” politicians of the so-called Visegrad 4 appear to have perverted their view of recent European history so much that they are blinded to the failings of the past. Poland and Hungary as friends of Russia! On the question of Islam’s growing influence in Europe and the urgent necessity of separating religion from politics and society (If you must, do it in the comfort of your own home, please) I offer the following short comment from… Read more »
Guest

bimbi…the piece is duly a PTP …..point-to-ponder..
One thing about ‘change’, it’s always morphing somewhere.

Guest

It’s funny in a way that the right wingers who compare Mrs Merkel to Hitler aka “the leader” are at the same time complaining that she is not a leader …

At those simpletons:
Germany is a democracy now, ruled by a coalition of three parties so Mrs Merkel has to find compromises – and that takes some time and is not always easy! It’s not like Hungary where O says: Jump!
and some people might just ask: How far?

PS:
To the Visegrad4 – be careful what you wish for!

A “stronger” chancellor in Germany might be less willing to spend our German Marks, sorry €s, on those lazy corrupt Eastern Europeans!

Especially the Poles are still considered by many right wingers in Germany as lazy thieves …

A bit OT:

There is a bad joke about Poles:

Can you find the four untruths in the following sentence?

Honest and hard working Pole with own car is looking for work …

pappp
Guest

OT, More media to be owned by Fidesz. Even more avenues to reach people, especially in rural regions, especially people with less education (who anyway still prefer Orban over the left-wing).

It’s probably not a coincidence that Kétfarkú Kutya Párt (the” party of the two-tailed dog”, which is just a group of urban activists) is the most active opposition “party” by far re the migrant referendum. It raised much more money than all other parties combined. How will the left-wing , already having minimal traction in media, will access rural voters? Or sports crazy voters? Another nail into the coffin of the Hungarian left-wing.

http://444.hu/2016/08/30/kormanykozelbe-kerulhet-a-nepszabadsag-kiadoja-is

Guest

If Hungarians like to be underdogs as in Kadar times – no problem for us Germans and the EU in general, as long as prices are low at the Balaton and people are willing to do everything for us …

And the EU will survive that too – the Visegrad4 should realise at last that they’re an unimportant irrelevant minority – even if they scream like mad!

I haven’t done the calculation (maybe Tappanch would like to do that …) but their economic power sure is much less than 10% of “The West” in the EU.

And probably nobody would give a sh*t ( to use Bayer’s words …) if they left the EU again!
Good riddance!

PS:
My wife often said that she wouldn’t mind living in Germany, infrastructure is much better, people are much nicer there, everybody likes her …

It just would be tough on her relatives – but they have to look after themselves …

Observer
Guest

@pappp …Raised much more money than all other parties combined….

How much? 12 million Forints ? Wow !

Since you compare, try these examples (of the many):
Orban allocated 8 000 million to Századvég at the stroke of a pen or channeled 80 000 million profit to his cronies in the guise of a settlement bond scheme.

How do you fight this size of a war chest which can buy any and all media and hundreds of politicians too?

pappp
Guest

KKP until yesterday raised 26m, and counting. Back in June 2015 it raised over 32m for a similar campaign. (Mind you I don’t think the billboards work for average people, I think KKP’s billboards are often confusing and probably help Fidesz). But the point is that no opposition party could raise that much donations from that many supporters (over 6,400 people in 2015) in any political fund raising campaign.

MSZP may spend more on the campaign eventually, but they don’t really try to raise funds as they are unable to and it would become apparent that a joke party with no national organization can outraise them at any time. Gyurcsany’s DK party – to put the 26m in perspective – will spend only 10m from its own funds.

It’s the relative strength of KKP, which is literally a brand name with 10 members at best, which speaks volumes about the state of the ‘”real” opposition.

That’s the scary thing, Observer, and you’d better face this.

webber
Guest

To everyone who is reading Pappp’s notes – he has, again, acted like a Fidesznik troll.

By misreporting what is in Hungarian news. He wrote: “KKP” (two-tailed dog party) “raised 26 m. forints”… while “no” (other?) “opposition party could raise that much donations…”

This is false. The opposition parties aren’t really campaigning on the referendum, and so aren’t really trying to raise money. It’s a dead-end for them, and they know it. They rightly want it to die, to be a failure for insufficient votes. The more you campaign on it, the more likely it is that people will vote.

KKP is, however, making fun of the referendum – great humor here, and kudos to them for that.

Original news in Hungarian here, for those who want to check:
http://index.hu/belfold/2016/08/29/az_ellenzeki_partok_kozul_a_ketfarku_kutyapart_kolt_legtobbet_nepszavazasos_kampanyra/

Pappp has, again, taken a bit of Hungarian news and twisted it around – interpreted it as “Fidesz will win, the left are losers…”

It doesn’t take a large brain to recognize where Pappp got that. If he is not a Fidesznik troll, he does the best impression of one I have ever seen.

Guest

The immediate give away from pappp is that he always talks of “the leftists” – you can’t put all the parties from LMP t p MSZP in one pot (as we say in German …) unless you are an extreme right winger yourself who knows:
To the right of us is only the wall – so of course everyone else must be a leftist …

pappp
Guest
The left is a bunch of losers – if they don’t try to act like a normal party. Like when they don’t raise funds from grass roots campaigns to do something, anything. I don’t say they need to buy billboards or run TV ads, but they would certainly need money to do anything at all. This referendum – as Andras Keszthelyi aptly suggested – is (could be) a referendum on Orban (just as the co-payment etc. referendum was a referendum on Gyurcsany). This is probably the only was for the left-wing the convince people to stay at home (to act in a way which is in the interest of the opposition). In this context efforts to convince people to stay at home (by however means, which in any cases requires money) would be useful, probably necessary if the left-wing ever hopes to win any majority in Parliament in 2018. Moreover, the left-wing has a perennial image of being lazy and not being a fighter. Being a wussy, people who are obsessively want to conform. This image needs to be countered. The opposition needs to look like it is active, and it is fighting – Orban. Not like in 2014 when… Read more »
Guest

Re: ‘how do you fight… ‘

Perhaps as Jonathan Rausch noted in his ideas about why politics here is crazy, outsiders would seem to be the game-changers. An example is Donny boy. Seemingly coming out of nowhere and look it what we’ve got now. We’ve got a shoot’em up almost every day around here. ..;-)…But I’m not so sure the setup there is conducive say to a Magyar ‘Trump’ so to speak or really any ‘outsiders’ not affiliated with so-called ‘parties’.

Observer
Guest

All of Orbán’s statements, but with a rare exception, include lies, twists and half truths. Take his “estimation” of the cohesion subsidies that it “has been a well-proven policy.”
Perhaps he meant it It has been proven an abject failure in the case of Hungary:
– Hungary achieved one of the highest draw down rate among the 16 recipients
– in 2014 3.7% GDP growth was reached with 8% EU subsidies.
– in 2015 2.8% growth with 6.6% subsidies.
The net results are terrible a whopping – 4.3% for 2014, and -3.3% for 2015 (in comparison to the highest earlier difference of -2.2% in 2004.

Add the
– nonexistent multiplier effect within the Hungarian economy and
– epic institutionalized corruption reaching % of GDP.

On the basis of the above the authors/operators of such a policy would have been sacked without compensation from long time ago and probably charged as accomplices in corruption.

The political effect of this generous, but outlandishly naive and misguided policy should be mentioned too: it indirectly props up the Orban regime prolonging the disastrous effects it has on the Hungarian economy and other spheres.

petofi
Guest

Keep in mind that the norms and values of nearly all Hungarians–you see, I can avoid blanket generalization–is in line with the predatory,
thieving nature of the leadership.

petofi
Guest

(I forgot the punchline…)

Hence the continuous, long-lasting, support of the government.
(And it ain’t gonna change soon, folks!)

Hajra Magyarok!!

Guest

London Calling!

“……And Zsolt Gréczy of Demokratikus Koalíció claims that the idea was actually stolen from Ferenc Gyurcsány, who suggested the creation of such an army a year ago.”

They should read HS closely!

Both I and someone else on here suggested an EU army years ago on your very site, Eva – possibly three or four years ago.

As regards the EU – even to us Brits who wanted to remain – the Euro required radical reform for it to be able to work.

So many disparate economies could not be unified unless closer – much closer – integration occurred. And a very powerful chancellory with an omnipotent central bank were created with a powerful – sovereignty busting – mandate to operate.

A consensus in the union?

Nem nem soha.

Guest

Ironic too that Orban allowed one of his finance ministers to declare that Hungary would adopt the Euro in due course.

However this declaration see-saws backwards and forwards depending on Viktorlae Orbanescu’s progression in his Páva Tánc.

petofi
Guest

In my many years, I’ve had occasion to deal (ie. find myself confronted) with con artists. Their chief weapon is obfuscation thereby pulling up the hapless linear thinking of most people who take comments–such as ‘Hungary’s willingness to adopt the euro’–at face value. Of course, it’s just a ploy to mis-direct.
In tennis, it’s called ‘wrong-footing’the opposition.

Orbansky is a past master at it.

Istvan
Guest
Eva writes in her essay “Viktor Orbán’s views didn’t receive much coverage, but at least one of the four propositions he arrived with in Warsaw–the creation of a common European army–has enjoyed some limited support.” Yes, one of those supporters is the drunken leader of the EU JC Junker so it’s not surprising that there is some traction for the idea (see https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/08/jean-claude-juncker-calls-for-eu-army-european-commission-miltary?CMP=share_btn_link ). Without the NATO framework, meaning in reality the US nuclear shield and advanced military technology, Europe can not develop a common military without actually reducing social welfare benefits across Europe because of the incrediable costs involved. Junker’s vision and I think Orban’s too is to create a standing common military that is somehow associated and protected by the NATO framework and US money. According to NATO’s annual reports, the USA is responsible for 73 percent of its defense expenditures. I am not sure that will sell over here in the USA. With the rise of robotic warfare the costs of maintaining an army are rising exponentially. As I mentioned yesterday there are now even such things a gps guided artillery shells (the M982 Excalibur), US General Robert Cone revealed in 2014 that the US Army is… Read more »
Guest

Re: “Such an army would help us design a common foreign and security policy’..

Is that possible? Can they be on the same page? And in light of Russia constantly trying to split the US from Europe how would the army function? Would love to see plans on command and control issues. Frankly, when it comes to ‘cooperation’ on the continent sometimes it just doesn’t happen.

nnnna
Guest

It’s not only Fico who was in Moscow, but Peter Szíjjartó will meet Lavrov in the third week of September too, after talking over the phone last Saturday.

http://444.hu/2016/08/27/szijjarto-peter-ujra-az-orosz-kulugyminiszterrel-talalkozik

petofi
Guest

The minions invited for a ‘sved asztal’ (buffet) before receiving their marching orders.

Member

Orban’s daughter and her husband engaged in official negotiation in the name of Hungary with the Kingdom of Bahrain. Rahel pretended to be Orban’s wife, and her husband pretended to be the Counselor . Does anyone knows when Rahel received any titles to act on behalf Hungary? Does anyone know how long is Tiborcz serves as the Counselor?
OR Orban’s government just fooled the officials of the Kingdom of Bahrain!

MINISTER OF ENERGY RECEIVES WIFE OF PRIME MINISTER OF HUNGARY
“They discussed a number of global oil and gas market and energy issues (…) investment opportunities and expanding economic and trade ties between the Kingdom of Bahrain and the Republic of Hungary. They discussed the benefit of the national economy in both the friendly countries out of improved cooperation.
Ms. Orban and his accompanying delegation expressed their deep appreciation for H.E. Dr. Mirza, and thanked him for the warm reception and issues discussed, which were aimed at creating a sustainable business environment and help build new trade and investment bridges between the two countries that will enhance the economic interests of both. They wished every success to the Kingdom for further development and prosperity.”

http://444.hu/2016/08/30/orban-rahel-gaz-es-olajbizniszrol-targyalt-bahreinben

Bowen
Guest

That’s Bahrain, whose human rights record has been described by Human Rights Watch as “dismal” and “worsening”.

A country for the Orban family to look up to, no doubt.

petofi
Guest

Nothing unusual here: just Orban continuing to make a laughing-stock
of Hungarians in every venue possible…

Observer
Guest

This indicates we have arrived. In Orbanistan the state is Orban, his will is the law and his daughter can go and negotiate the family business… sorry, .. state affairs.

Cant wait to see what will be the spin of this.

petofi
Guest

What spin?
Who will report it?

petofi
Guest

And if someone does, then: DENY, DENY, DENY, DENY.
Or, “mistranslation”!
An American plot!!

While all this will be going on, Orbansky will be laughing his guts out on the can–

petofi
Guest

If people really wanted to know what’s going on in Hungary, someone should go into the gypsy communities in the States and Britain and ask
the local ‘travellers’to explain…

petofi
Guest

But it will have to be done ‘undercover’– even far afield, the gypsies won’t betray one of their own.

Observer
Guest

Petofi is right so far (31 August noon).

The Rahel incident is not event mentioned by the ever lying Magyar Idok or 888.

Member

Well, with the exception of the press owned by the government, there are plenty of news as of 31 August 3:00 pm, Hungary.
MTI actually published the refute from Rahel , where she very much calls the Kingdon of Bahria a bunch of liars. http://ots.mti.hu/hirek/119874/orban_rahel_kozlemenye
http://hungarytoday.hu/news/press-rumour-pm-orbans-daughter-held-energy-policy-talks-bahrain-behalf-hungary-63847 “Me and my husband were on a private visit in Bahrain between 17 and 20 September 2015. We paid the cost of the travel by ourselves. Every other claim in connection with this is a lie”
http://www.blikk.hu/aktualis/belfold/orban-rahel-szerint-hazugsagokat-allit-rola-a-bahreini-sajto/1wp3y6c
In Bahrein they corrected the text on their news portal. (I would of never guessed that they follow Hungarian media so closely…)
http://hvg.hu/itthon/20160831_a_bahreini_hatosag_oldalan_maris_atirtak_az_orban_rahel_latogatasarol_szolo_hirt
http://nol.hu/most-itt/rahel-kiralykisasszonyka-bahreinben-1629829http://444.hu/2016/08/30/arab-hirugynokseg-orban-rahel-a-magyar-koztarsasag-nagyra-becsult-miniszterelnoke
http://index.hu/belfold/2016/08/30/orban_rahel_szerint_hazudik_a_bahreini_hatosag/
http://24.hu/kozelet/2016/08/31/feljelentest-tesznek-orban-rahel-bahreini-targyalasa-miatt/

Guest

Not too much OT:

The German magazine SPIEGEL again reports scathingly on the brutally inhuman way the refugees waiting at the Serbian border are treated by Hungarian authorities – almost reminds one of WW2 …
http://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/fluechtlinge-in-ungarn-und-serbien-ein-jahr-spaeter-dasselbe-elend-a-1110275.html

The situation seems worse than a year ago!

UNHCR and Human Rights Watch (now Tyrker can tell us that these are financed by Soros …) report beatings by policemen and bites by their dogs.
Unbelievable!

PS: Here is a series of pictures – a video is also included in the link.
http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fluechtlinge-an-der-ungarisch-serbischen-grenze-fotostrecke-140637.html