The first convicted Hungarian terrorist: György Budaházy

Sympathizers of the extreme right are outraged. György Budaházy and 15 of his co-conspirators were found guilty of terrorist activities committed during 2006 and 2007. Yes, ten years ago, and this is not the final verdict. Both sides are appealing. The prosecution claims the sentences were too lenient. The defense wants the case dismissed.

The judicial history of cases against Budaházy is so complicated that it would take days to trace their course up and down the legal system for more than a decade. The courts just don’t know what to do with terrorists/heroes. Thus I can’t be as confident as Ágnes Vadai of the Demokratikus Koalíció when she expressed her satisfaction with the first and only verdict against far-right terrorists in Hungary. It’s quite possible that within a year all the members of the Arrows of Hungarians, the movement established by Budaházy, will be acquitted.

Budaházy is the offspring of a family whose roots go back to the thirteenth century. By now, however, he has little else but his name to distinguish him. The stories of his renowned ancestors fighting for the homeland might have been his justification for exulting tradition and having a mission to restore Hungary to its former greatness.

He became first known in 2002 when a disappointed Viktor Orbán made remarks insinuating that the election had been stolen by the socialist/liberal parties. The electoral law stipulated the destruction of the ballots after a certain period of time after which Budaházy, claiming fraud, organized a blockade of the Elizabeth Bridge across the Danube. The inexperienced police force must have spent at least four hours trying to remove Budaházy and his handful of followers. Nothing happened to him then.

From that point on, Budaházy continued to taunt the authorities. He was arrested and let go several times until, in January 2008, he was charged with incitement against the democratic order as a result of letters published in the infamous kuruc.info, a website associated with Jobbik. In them, he outlined how to build barricades and argued how important it is to have bullet-proof vests. He asserted that “a patriotic dictatorship is much better than a democracy that squanders the future,” among many other equally compelling slogans. He envisaged “commando units that will destroy the enemies,” he urged people to blockade the capital, he talked about the stones and Molotov cocktails that would ensure the patriots’ victory over the people’s enemies. He told the democratically elected politicians and officials “to vanish if they want to save their lives.” Parliament, he wrote, should be forcibly dissolved. Once the democratic regime collapsed, a “sacred leadership,” whatever that means, would be established. At that point the presiding judge admitted that Budaházy overstepped the boundaries of what is acceptable as free speech, but, after all, he said, his calls for the overthrow of the government remained unanswered. As I said at the time, “that to me means that he is not guilty because he wasn’t successful.”

The appellate court judge agreed with me. He overruled the verdict and ordered the proceedings to begin anew. This time a different judge found Budaházy guilty and sentenced him to a one-year suspended sentence. Another appeal followed, which upheld the lower court’s decision. Budaházy’s lawyer at this point requested a review of the case from Hungary’s highest court, the Kúria, which in June 2012 acquitted him.

But Budaházy’s verbal calls to action were soon enough followed by deeds. He and his associates used Molotov cocktails against the party headquarters of the socialist and liberal parties and the homes of several members of the government. The Arrows of Hungarians also set fire to a club called Red Csepel, the Broadway ticket office, and two bars frequented by gays. They blew up an ATM in Székesfehérvár to get money for their endeavors. They also severely beat Sándor Csintalan, a former MSZP politician, who at the time worked for HírTV. The attackers kept yelling: “you damned filthy Jew.” They did all that to raise the level of fear and force the government to resign.

Because of these criminal acts the Central Investigative Prosecutor’s Office (Központi Nyomozó Főügyészség) in September 2010 charged Budaházy and 16 others with terrorism, causing bodily harm, and coercion. Today’s verdict was in connection with this case. Of the 17 defendants two received suspended sentences. The sentences for the other 15 were harsh. Budaházy himself got 13 years without the possibility of parole, of which he will have to serve 11 years since he has already spent two years, on different occasions, in custody.

The severity of the punishment stunned the spectators, mostly extreme right-wing sympathizers. When Budaházy appeared in the courtroom, he was greeted with frenetic applause. In turn, he greeted his sympathizers with “Szabadság” (Freedom). (Ironically, that was the greeting used by the members of the communist party in the early years of the Rákosi regime.) After the verdict was announced several people cried.

The sympathizers greet György Source: Népszabadság / Photo: Imre Földi

The sympathizers greet György Budaházy
Source: Népszabadság / Photo: Imre Földi

During the trial the accused men denied their guilt, but some made self-incriminating statements or gave accusatory testimony against others. Budaházy’s defense lawyer, István Szikinger, in his statement, downplayed the actions of his defendant, claiming that “happy is the country which has such terrorists.” He charged that during the investigative phase several instances of malfeasance occurred, and he wants Budaházy acquitted of all charges. The prosecution, which is appealing for a harsher sentence, sees the situation very differently. According to the prosecutor, a strict military hierarchy existed within the movement in which the members followed the orders of Budaházy.

György Budaházy waiting for the verdict Source Népszabadság / Photo: Imre Földi

György Budaházy waiting for the verdict
Source Népszabadság / Photo: Imre Földi

Jobbik, several of whose politicians were present at the reading of the verdict, is outraged. The official Jobbik statement claims that the verdict is the greatest shame of the last 26 years. Budaházy is convicted, but “none of communist leaders of the Biszku-type,* the culprits of the robber privatization, corrupt politicians, or Ferenc Gyurcsány and his friends who are responsible for the police terror of 2006 ended up behind bars.”

In its accusation of Ferenc Gyurcsány Jobbik was not alone. András Schiffer, former co-chairman of LMP, wrote on his Facebook page: “Budaházy 13 years. How many for shooting out eyes?” This accusation of “shooting out eyes” became Fidesz’s battle cry, repeated over and over until it finally stuck. The “shooting out eyes” supposedly happened when the police “attacked peaceful demonstrators” with rubber bullets. The “battle” that was fought on the streets of Budapest was anything but peaceful. More inexperienced policemen were injured than so-called peaceful demonstrators. And yes, at one point the police used rubber bullets, but only one person suffered an eye injury as a result.

A terrorist, a poster child for injustice, a hero. Is it any wonder that the Hungarian courts can’t find their way in the Budaházy case?

 

*Béla Biszku was a hardline communist who, after the failed revolution of 1956, served as minister of interior. In 2011 he was charged with war crimes. He was accused of failing to protect civilians in wartime. In addition, he was held responsible for ordering the security forces to open fire on crowds. He died in 2014 while his lawyer was appealing his sentence in the first instance. I wrote in more detail about Biszku’s case earlier.

August 30, 2016
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András B. Göllner
Guest

A country, with a legal system that takes 13 years to bring a criminal to justice, is a country without rule of law. Budaházy will be out within days and members of the Orbán controlled judiciary will ensure, that his appeal will take another 13 years, at which time, he will be granted a Presidential pardon. Far fetched ? If Bayer can get the Order of Merit from the country’s President, for preaching hatred against Gypsies, Jews and Muslims, why not give one to Budaházy for blocking a bridge, beating up an ex-commie, and issuing murder threats to liberals ?

webber
Guest

The case isn’t over. That was just the first sentence.
Budahazy is still appealing – still has the right to appeal – so that “harsh verdict” (Eva’s judgment) still might be overturned.

Budahazy walked home from court with his friends and family, and no apparent police presence. If you are r-winger “house arrest” is a joke in Hungary.
If you are on the left, you are kept in jail until the final innocent verdict is reached – for years and years.

http://index.hu/belfold/2016/08/30/kis_zsidozas_utan_hazasetalt_a_torvenyszekrol_budahazy_gyorgy/

Video above – with Budahazy asking a reporter what he was wearing around his neck (apparently a star of David), “What’s this? Are you a Jew?”
Reporter – Uhuh.
Then “Ha, ha, ha!” all around – because for the right in Hungary, asking someone if they are a Jew is considered an insult, and clever, and answering that you are is apparently considered stupid.
Only in Hungary!
(I can already imagine some people here saying “how dare you insinuate Hungarians are antisemites.” Spare me. I didn’t. But THOSE Hungarians who think that little question is witty (szellemes) and the answer deserves a laugh obviously have some very strange ideas about Jews.

Orionpax
Guest

Can hungary even win in a war against Israel which has nuke’s and massive military. If they keep attacking Jews then the magyar nation should brace for biggest war in its territory. Hungarian fascist is going all out against everyone. A nation which has no significance in world stage is provoking everyone around them. I can only imagine future Hungary will be size of Budapest thanks to fascist idiots.

Guest
David_
Guest

The real question is: what the hell is wrong with Andras Schiffer? Why is he being a useful idiot for literal far right terrorists?

petofi
Guest

Hey, David, Mr. Schiffer has to make a living.
He’s a jew, ain’t he?

Member

Ceterum censeo “petofi” esse ejectum…

comment image

Guest

That’s a really good and important question!

I remember when many years ago I first heard about LMP and it was dscribed as a kind of “Green” party. Before that I had wondered why there were no Greens – at least in cosmopolitan Budapest the need for them was obvious.

A bit OT re the Greens:
And in the rural part of course too – even today I wonder how unecological people here in the villages behave, for many recycling is unknown, the garbage cans are overflowing every week (ours is half full maybe once a month …)

Just yesterday evening when it was still hot a terrible smell or rather stink wafted through the village – someone was burning stuff, don’t know what it was but I know that in Germany the fire brigade and the police would have come …

Observer
Guest

I have to conceed to the politician who many years ago called AS a self promoting obnoxious prick.
Sorry for the rude but apt expression.

Member

and somewhat disturbed mentally…

Guest

Again, not too much OT:

Seems that hate crime is everywhere now – unbelievable!

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/aug/30/five-teenage-boys-arrested-after-man-dies-following-attack-in-essex

He died because he used his native language …

Guest
There is a huge difference betweeen hate crimes in the UK and hate crimes in Hungary. Not in the nature of the crime itself, which is the same anywhere, but in the way the laws are applied. In Britan, as in many European countries, such crimes are immediately tackled, and prosecution follows swiftly. That is exactly how it should be. In Hungary, as a commentater noted, it has taken 13 years to bring Budaházy to trial. Why? Hungarians suffer from confused values since racism is an everyday occurence, at all levels of society, where it is permissable to verbally abuse anyone who is not a Fidesz supporter. Physical abuse and threats of violence are just the next step after verbal abuse, in a country with no barriers or boundaries of civilized conduct in public places. The judiciary (or in Hungary, lack of) reflects the people, and we are certainly in a sorry state here since Fidesz have abolished the two basic purposes of a government- One – the proper allocation of state coffers through a lawful and fair fiscal policy Two- to keep citizens’ worst insticts (such as death threats, violence, etc) in check through enforcable laws. Neither is happening… Read more »
Guest

Re’ a lawless country’

You invite one to think of a ‘wasteland’.

As the laws have been ground down I would like think ‘I can show you fear in a handful of dust’. Such a dessicated atmosphere now exists in the country.

pappp
Guest
The next phase will take much less, probably a year or two, max. However if on appeal Budaházy will be acquitted, there will be a third instance, another 1-2 years. What hopefully will not happen this time is that the second instance remands the case back to retrial (as was the case with the KH Bróker – Kulcsár case whose first instance verdict was announced only late 2015 some 15 years after the events). The problem with such criminal organizations is that the prosecution – for whatever reasons – wants to bring everybody to court in the very same trial, in this case like 16 people. Inevitably the case, the handling of evidence, the various testimonies, etc. become very complex, the probability of some procedural error very high. Budaházy himself could’ve been convicted much earlier but with the whole gang it took many more years. That said, if history is any guide, brace yourself, Budaházy will be acquitted. Not just because most judges are right-wing (especially in the criminal division), but also because if the charge is new or unprecedented then the courts are extremely reluctant to convict. I also think that after a 13 year verdict letting him into… Read more »
Guest

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHjCM-eIAT0 – Morvai’s performance and usual style during the trial.

webber
Guest

Appalling. The apparent lack of respect for the law and representatives of the law is simply incredible.
Any American, British, Australian, Canadian, Jamaican, Indian, Pakistani (or you-name-it former-Brit country) judge would have thrown Morvai and all the people cheering out of the court immediately. If they made any comments at all to or about the judge to his or her face in court, they themselves would immediately face charges – fines, most likely, but possibly even prison, and immediate prison. There is no need for that to go to another court, the presiding judge can handle it and the guards in the court can take them right away.

Istvan
Guest

Clearly the Judge believed she lacked any authority to bring the court room to order. The truth is she was correct, she knew that she lacked the authority to control her court. To say that open contempt for the rule of law was displayed is obvious. What do we know about the judge?

webber
Guest

I wonder if it is just this court and just this judge?

If it is, that suggests the whole thing is just a farce.

If it isn’t just this judge, then I wonder – was that acceptable behaviour in Hungarian courts?

I have never had the bad luck to appear before a Hungarian court, so don’t know how one is supposed to act in front of Hungarian judges. To me, the whole thing looks like a sick joke.

If that is not acceptable behaviour, then the judge should step down, and the next judge should demand heavy police presence in the court.

pappp
Guest
Webber, the Hungarian judges are not strong-willed mavericks like those people in American movies. They are conservative, reserved, often quite shy intellectual-types, who don’t want to cause controversy, they are very much like bureaucrats, and are often women with very young children. They are also acutely aware that many of their colleagues (including superiors at the next instance) sympathize with Jobbik or perhaps attend Kurultáj. Also the security force almost certainly leans towards Jobbik. I’ve yet to meet any person in the security area who wasn’t a Jobbik or a Fidesz fan. The kind of tough judge you imagine just does not exist in Hungary. Judges simply do not know how to deal with such a scene, with assertive politicians in the audience. They are afraid to be too tough. Whoever was the judge will surely not resign. If this was a group of gipsies shouting etc. then probably the judge and the security would have been tougher. There is more experience with them, and their disruptive court behavior is genuinely disliked. With mainstream politicians in the audience, however, and like it or not Morvai is mainstream just because she works in Strasbourg, the court and its personnel are powerless.… Read more »
Guest
Re: ‘I have never had the bad luck to appear before a Hungarian court, so don’t know how one is supposed to act in front of Hungarian judges. To me, the whole thing looks like a sick joke’ webber I have to say I had a great chuckle when I read this. Pretend way back in the ‘good old days’ when Kadarian roses showered the land you as kulfoldi has to check in to the ‘Rendorseg Szalloda’ which had ‘staff’ all around the country. If you spent a few minutes I’d think you’d certainly get an idea how you should act…;-)…. The staff had what I should say was a nice komoly and ‘no joke’ attitude baby. Don’t even think about it. No time for fooling around I can tell you. To tell you the truth in the vein of Prof’s , ‘they can do whatever they want’ one could believe that while you were near the ‘clink’ it wouldn’t take much to have you sitting in it. Perhaps just for any reason. Most of the time on those jaunts I guess I got lucky tempering my fear because my companion was crying all the time. I was more worried… Read more »
webber
Guest

wrfree – Watch the video (posted above by Gellert).

webber
Guest
Pappp, you watch too many Westerns. What I wrote does not apply just to America. In Britain, a judge would throw people like that in prison without blinking for contempt of court – which is a very serious charge in ALL English-speaking countries. You (and Morvai) seem to be under the misapprehension that MPs and MEPs cannot be arrested and taken to prison for a day or so, just because they have immunity. They CAN be arrested – immunity means immunity from prosecution, not from arrest. Those are two very different things (if you have ever been arrested, but not prosecuted, you will know what I mean – it can happen even in Hungary). Morvai could have been forcibly taken from the court by the court guards, and she would have if she did that sort of thing in Britain. If she resisted, they would cuff her, and take her to jail. Doubtless she would not be prosecuted, because she is an MEP, but she would spend an hour or two in a cell. So sorry Pappp: being an MEP or MP does not mean you can do whatever you like, without fear of punishment. If, for example, an MP… Read more »
webber
Guest
pappp
Guest
Where did I say that Morvai had immunity or that I agree with her in any way or that I agree with the judge’s behavior? Where? Don’t misrepresent me. Since I know the judicial system somewhat more than the average people I tried to tell you and others how people there work and why they will not do what you would like them to do. I also think that the judge should’ve arrested those people, throw them out, issue fines etc. But she was probably afraid of the political repercussions. And since the recruitment base of the Hungarian judges are different from the English or US judges they will never throw out or arrest aggressive right-wing politicians from the court room. Morvai’s bunch – for all this judge knows – might get into power in 2 years time and they will cut the salaries of judges or whatever and then the judges can go and lodge a complaint with Hitler (as they say in Hungary). As you can imagine she will be very popular among her colleagues. This isn’t how she should behave but this is reality. I absolutely agree that lying in court is not prosecuted in Hungary at… Read more »
petofi
Guest

judge…

The thing to note is that the powers that be put a hapless, young woman as judge–an invitation for the crowd to act out.

Where was an eperienced, 60 year old judge?

Member

What I find truly amusing about Morvai is her possible believe that the likes of Buday would have any “forgiveness” of Morvai’s children. Her children’s father is Jewish, and I not think that the Jobbik would differentiate between the mother or father being Jewish. Morris’ kids could be beaten up, and thrown Molotov koktel by the gang of Budays the same way as they done it to others. Although I used to believe Morvai is a smart woman, I had to change my mind about her. She does not see that Buday is danger to Morvais children. She a dumb person. The funny thing is, when you look around in that room there are other people who do have Jewish blood relatives, and still love Buday’s gang.

petofi
Guest

Morvai….and Law in the land of Simplicimus!

Fellini would’ve loved those faces–perfect for a film of the 13th century.

Guest

Re: the practice of ‘law’ in Magyarorszag

If it gets confounded with determining ‘essential and substantial differences between establishing historical and criminal responsibility’ then of course unadulterated ‘facts’ would seem to have a hard time getting into the deliberations. Courtrooms now would seem to be another favored place to practice reformulations of the insidious past.

And regarding Stevan’s ‘Ibi Gabori’ piece from another post. I was impressed by her ‘forgiveness’ in the face of hatred. As for Gabori, Biszku and Budahazy all are examples of the best and worst of humanity. Brings me to that concept of ‘reconciliation’.

It would appear the country suffers from a deep deep lack of it. The quest for revenge and resentment looks to be the paramount behaviors. Setting scores seems to be part of the political game. There looks to be enough in Gabori’s soul to destroy the depressing ills. The question would look to be still out on some of the remaining Magyars who keep on singing those insipid songs.

pappp
Guest

Péter Uj (editor in chief of 444.hu formerly of index.hu) in his funny column Szerda in Nészabadság wrote today:

“…Ha hiszik, ha nem, a kis következmények nélküli ugarat: a Kétfarkú Kutya lett az ellenzék vezető ereje. 2016 nyarára, hip-hop, nem mondom, hogy nem megérdemelten, nem nem-indokolhatatlanul, sőt de azért kicsit mégis meg vagyok lepve, többet néztem volna ki ­Schmuck Andorból például, vagy legalább Szanyi Tibor megszoríthatná őket szólóban…”

He seriously thinks – like I do – that the two-tailed dog party is now the most serious opposition party.

petofi
Guest

@ pappp

One of my full-proof methods of discovering Trolls is to note that they pop up between every few comments…principally, to litter the blog.

Get my meaning, bud?

pappp
Guest

Let’s not get into this idiotic argument again. There are regular commenters who raise off topic items, partly because many of such topics were recently topics or will be topics of posts again. So in a sense they are still relevant even if off topic on that day. If one of the most influential journalists of the free, independent part of the Hungarian media thinks that the KKP is the strongest opposition party then that has to be noted, this isn’t trolling. And it’s a good feeling that it is not only me who has this opinion.

webber
Guest

Pappp, your personal off topic items are ALWAYS about how the Hungarian opposition “must lose, will lose, is hopeless” blahblahblah.

So, for the umpteenth time, I’ll remind you that the opposition has won quite a few by elections all over Hungary, from large cities to small villages.

If you act like a troll, you’ll be called a troll, and you have been acting like one with your triumphalism. “Fidesz will win” seems to be your mantra, dude.

pappp
Guest
Try to think about it this way, webber. Let’s suppose you have the Olympics and you want to train competitors for that. Just for the sake of argument, OK? Which method of training (discourse) would you say is better ie. meaning more effective, meaning it provides more medals? Being a loving mother style coach often patting the back of your apparently not too active and bright trainee? Or being a tough taskmaster, telling your wife that you’re gonna drown her in the pool if she dares to swim so slowly next time (Katinka’s husband), hitting the kids like crazy (as we saw from from videos about Chinese coaches)? I’m not saying that the training for Olympics is humane or even that I care about the Olympics much. These aren’t the issue. The issue is that if you are preparing for your toughest match (let’s say the 2018 elections against Fidesz) deluding yourself about how well you do will get you absolutely nowhere (when objective data such the size of grassroots donations recently indicate the opposite). I’m not a coach for the leftists but I don’t have a bad conscience to tell the obvious because apparently people like you refuse to… Read more »
webber
Guest

I think you are very, very silly.
“people like” me? Who are people like me?
Weren’t you quoting a taxi driver?
Since you like representing public opinion, and think you know what I think, may I suggest that the next time you are in Budapest, you get an orange t-shirt with “Csak a Fidesz!” on it. Wear it. Watch the reactions you get. Just watch and listen.
You might want to take a different shirt with you – to change into if things get… interesting…

webber
Guest

For English speakers “Csak a Fidesz” means “Just Fidesz.” It was a slogan in the 2006 campaign.

pappp
Guest

Good point. But this is exactly the tragedy of the left-wing opposition, isn’t it? People hate Fidesz, but they certainly aren’t enthusiastic about MSZP or DK or Együtt. Apparently the leftist parties aren’t doing something right – that would be my very diplomatic conclusion.

pappp
Guest

Now this. Are MSZPniks now saying one should vote yes, or what, because until now they seem to have been saying people should not vote at all?

http://444.hu/2016/09/01/az-mszp-kesz-tamogatni-a-kormanyt-a-kvotaellenes-harcban

webber
Guest

Oh, I don’t know. Since 2010 the leftist parties have won more by elections than they’ve lost.

Hatred can propel a party to power, you know. It certainly worked for Fidesz in 2006.

Bowen
Guest

Webber: You mean Fidesz in 2010. Certainly no-one voted in Orban Viktor as ruler-for-life because of his manifesto and policies. Because he didn’t put forward any, or campaign with any kind of manifesto whatsoever.

Fidesz spent the next 4 years messing round with the voting system to their clear advantage, setting up fake opposition parties.

Since 2014, Fidesz have been whipping up xenophobia hatred, and very little else, because they don’t actually seem to have any real policies. They never have had, other than ‘remain in power and steal as much money as possible’.

So, if it weren’t for the rigged voting system, Fidesz could easily be swept out of power in 2018 on a tide of contempt. The problem is who would step in to replace them …

webber
Guest

You are right.

petofi
Guest

@Pappp

All I have to see is a) the sheer size of your comment; and b) the frequency of your comments…to know that you’re trolling.

Can’t you go and play in traffic somewhere?

Szuztea
Guest

Jó nagy vicc ez az egész már megint

Tyrker
Guest

“at one point the police used rubber bullets, but only one person suffered an eye injury as a result”

That’s incorrect. Tamás Bodoky, who has worked for publications like index.hu and atlatszo.hu – not exactly far-right websites or Fidesz mouthpieces – has stated that a total of 14 people suffered eye injuries from rubber bullets fired by riot police on 23 October 2006, and for 4 of them, the injuries have turned out to be permanent. (one of them later committed suicide.)

petofi
Guest

And Tyrker,
can you imagine all the brain-damaged individuals since 2010?

petofi
Guest

Not to mention, that in the six years, a whole generation of young has been habituated to the lowest levels of human behaviour…as the only means of advancement in Hungary.

Hajra Magyarok!

Guest

tyrker, how much does O pay you for continually checking this blog for “errors”?

Remember when you told us that that Ferrari was driven by an Italian businessman living in Hungary? But you forgotto say that the car had a Slovak licence plate ….

Your half-truths are typical for a troll – and you’re one of the worst!

You should be ashamed!

Tyrker
Guest

wolfi,
I wish you refrained from these ad hominem attacks when I’m pointing out factual errors in a neutral style, citing numbers and sources. Your misguided suspicions about my identity and motivations are not only offensive but irrelevant, too.

Guest

Neutral style</i/ that's the best joke today!

You are anything but neutral!

Your propaganda – always telling half truths and hiding important details which are not to your liking tells us all about you – you are just a Fidesz troll, whether you're paid or not!

And again that Ferrari example showed "Wes Geistes Kind "you are!

Observer
Guest

Where did u get these numbers from? From Morvai?
Because I heard an old lady talking about 28 people blinded by Gyurcsány himself.

Tyrker
Guest
Observer, As I pointed out in my comment, the numbers are from amás Bodoky, an investigative journalist. If you can read Hungarian, I would suggest that you check out this interview that appeared in Hetek: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:n8F_Ls2WaRkJ:www.hetek.hu/interju/200811/rosszkor_rossz_helyen+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=hu “Az őszi események során 14 esetben volt szem- vagy szemkörnyéki lövés, abból négy maradandó, vagyis négy szemkilövésről beszélünk. Két embert név szerint is ismerek, akit az egyik szemére egész életére gumilövedékkel tettek vakká. Egyiküket Nagy Lászlónak hívják, neki a szájpadlásán keresztül kellett kiszedni a lövedéket a szemüregéből. A Társaság a Szabadságjogokért elnevezésű jogvédő szervezetnek is volt egy védence, aki fehér zsebkendőt lobogtatva menekült, és eközben ötször lőtték hátba, valamennyi találattal 8 napon túl gyógyuló sebesülést okozva. A szakértői vizsgálat kiderítette, hogy a rendőrök több ponton is megsértették az előírásokat: sokkal nagyobb energiájú patront használtak, mint amilyenre engedélyük volt; azzal az előírt 15 méternél közelebbi célpontra lőttek; és a lábak szintje helyett sokszor fejmagasságban célozták meg a tüntetőket. Nem hivatalosan hallottam egy ilyen bevetésen részt vevő rendőrtől, hogy október 23-án eleinte parancsra lehetett csak elsütni a fegyvert, de amikor elszabadult a pokol, már szabad kezet kaptak a puskások.” Other victims whose names we know include Károly Kenéz, a café owner, and Attila Csorba, the person… Read more »
Observer
Guest

Tyrker

You guys can never say anything without a lie or a twist?

Your statement, i.e. translation is wrong. The material, for whatever is worth, says “14 cases of a shot in the eye or the area of the eyes … with 4 cases of lasting eye injury” in fact one case of lost eye.

This is turned into a massive propaganda item of “shot eyes”, latest in Schiffer’s mouth.

I monitored the events here in Budapest, where the Erzsebeth bridge Pest side was barricaded by the “protesters” for more more than 12 hours. The police faced them, often being pelted with stones. After several warnings the police moved in to clear the thoroughfare.
Mistakes were made and officers were punished, fired. End of story.

Reminding the readers, many signs point out that the “spontaneous” demonstrations were organized and fueled by Fidesz, who lost the elections 6 months earlier and hoped to over-through the government. “Early elections” was the slogan (Előrehozott választások).

I have no amnesia.

Guest

Thanks, Observer!

I’ve often found that tyrker uses lies and half-truths in his Fidesz propaganda, sometimes it’s obvious, sometimes not.
The creature really is a troll – Eva should delete him imho – he has lots of other platforms where he can spout his idiocies!

Member

They should file a complaint with Orban. It was him who started it all. Oh, I guess that would never happen. How about the Varosliget? How many people suffered injuries there by the gang of Orban? Where is Morvai when we need her!

Roderick S. Beck
Guest

What Budaházy said is protected free speech. Any American knows that. Time Europe catches up. The US Communist party advocates revolution. No one locks them up.

webber
Guest
Oh really? If you plan to overthrow the US government, that’s free speech? Strange – it violates a federal law, and quite a few people have gone to prison for it over the years. Text of the law here, FYI https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2385 It wasn’t just plans, recall. Budahazy and friends acted on them. They threw molotov cocktails at businesses – one with clients inside – at political parties’ headquarters, and at personal residences of politicians they disliked. Moreover, they severely beat two people (the beating of one is a separate case). That’s free speech? Any one of these crimes is enough to get you a hefty prison sentence in the US. If you blow up an ATM to fund your revolution, that’s free speech? I believe that counts as bank robbery in the US. So, assault, multiple cases destruction of private property including one case of endangerment of life (lives), bank robbery, and conspiring to overthrow a democratically elected government. How many years do you think a person would get in the US for all that? I bet it would be more than 13 – a lot more. And what does that 13 years mean in Hungary? He’ll be out in… Read more »