The latest plan: The militarization of Hungary’s youth

A few days before the October referendum Viktor Orbán gave an interview to Katolikus Rádió in which he painted an unusually grim picture of the Hungarian military. He pointed out that Hungary’s neighbors have been expanding their military capabilities lately, but “Hungary is way behind.” “A serious country has its own army, an effective force,” he insisted. Of course, what Orbán neglected to tell his audience was that for the current absolutely deplorable state of the Hungarian army his own administration is largely responsible.

The Hungarian Army was never much to brag about, but at least earlier governments allocated more money to the military. In 2006 the government spent 283 billion forints for defense, which was 1.24% of the GDP. Today defense spending is 0.79% of the GDP. The MSZP-SZDSZ governments steadily, if modestly, raised military expenditures while the Fidesz government has consistently shrunk military spending. The current plan is to increase the military budget by 0.1% each year. That means that the country will reach the level of military spending during Gyurcsány’s last year in office only in 2022.

This is at least the second time the Orbán government has announced its intention to do something with the Hungarian army. In 2014 they promised the modernization of equipment, but without adequate resources it is hard to replace all the antiquated and often unusable tanks, helicopters, and artillery. According to a 2014 article, Hungary had 15 tanks, 12 howitzers, and 0 helicopters. At that time there was talk about purchasing Italian-made helicopters, but so far nothing has come of it. Although at the military base at Tata there were about 50 Soviet T-72 tanks manufactured in the 1970s, half of these were good only for parts. The 12 guns are also Soviet made, D20s. At that time experts estimated that the Hungarian army’s arsenal was 20 to 30 years behind the times.

And don’t think the situation was better when it came to uniforms. Hungarian soldiers serving in Afghanistan, for example, had to return in their old uniforms so they could be used by the soldiers taking their place. As for fighter planes, I assume the readers remember the two Gripens that were practically destroyed in accidents due to inexperienced pilots. Apparently, there isn’t enough money for fuel for extended flights. Hence pilots are inadequately trained.

The state of the Hungarian army nothing like what this photo suggests

The state of the Hungarian army is nothing like what this photo suggests

Then there is the problem of personnel. The Hungarian Army consists of about 25,000 men and women, but “under the best of circumstances only 4-5,000 of them could be sent to a fighting unit.” Recruiting hasn’t been successful. As a source told Index, “today only those come who have no other opportunities. The mother of numerous children in the hope of 80-90,000 forints a month.” Those who have technical skills would rather work for one of the auto manufacturers where they make a great deal more money.

Under these circumstances it is hard to imagine that the Orbán government will be able to attract 20,000 people as reservists in the near future. Because this is the plan. Moreover, it looks as if these additional men and women will be part of a kind of alternate army, organized along the lines of the National Guard in the United States. This idea has been kicking around for a while. István Simicskó, minister of defense, who was undersecretary of defense in the first Orbán government (1998-2002), has been smitten with the idea for some time. At first he wanted to call it Magyar Gárda, but then came the far-right paramilitary formation that usurped that name. In 2007, while in opposition, he pushed for the establishment of a Honi Gárda (Home Guard). Now as minister he is in the position to implement his plans, and it looks as if he has convinced Viktor Orbán to endorse them.

Orbán outlined the plan for a territorial Honi Gárda, if they settle for that name, which will consist of at least one company of reservists for every “járás.” Currently there are 174 “járások” in Hungary. A Hungarian company (század) consists of 3-5 platoons (szakaszok), which consist of 30 men and women. Therefore, even if we assume only 3 platoons to a company, we are talking about 15,750 new recruits who will have to be trained, armed, and paid. However, I assume that the companies will consist of four platoons because Orbán specifically talked about 20,000 men and women. This plan, under the present circumstances and given the limited funds available, sounds like a pipe dream to me. But Orbán indicated that the ministry will begin the organization of these territorial units on January 1, 2017. These territorial companies will be attached to the ten already existing garrisons.

Some military experts might be skeptical about the viability of setting up such an ambitious alternative army, but the government has already approved the plan. Only the details remain to be worked out. Apparently by setting up such local units the government “would like to strengthen the patriotic commitment and generosity of the population.”

A network of military sports clubs will also be established through which the army will try to reach youngsters at a very early age. Simicskó was talking about seven-year-olds.

The government also wants more school children to acquire basic military knowledge. Simicskó claims that they don’t intend to introduce militarism into the educational system. Rather, they would like to instill “a value system, a cast of mind that is based on patriotism.” As he said, “our task is difficult because in a sense we represent a counterculture.” He complained about “children sitting in front of the computer whose social responsibility is minimal.”

Some people, including me, would call Simicskó’s plan brainwashing. Instead of beefing up the army, which at the moment couldn’t resist an invading force even for the short period required before the arrival of NATO forces, the government will now spend who knows how much money on the indoctrination of the youth. Everything is subordinated to political considerations by the Orbán government. Even the security of the country. Under the guise of military preparedness the government will be spreading the “values” of the illiberal state to a new generation of cadres. Another shameful move on the part of Viktor Orbán.

October 17, 2016
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Guest

London Calling!

Honi Gárda!!!

In England during WWII, the ‘home guard’ was formed to protect the home front in case of invasion and they were recruited from the old men – and others – who were passed as unfit to go to war.

They were nicknamed ‘Dad’s Army’!

Presumably the Honi Gárda will be recruited from the pool of people available – minus all the youngsters who have left?

The home guard used to be a figure of fun as they carried out manoeuvres with broomsticks as guns – because the real ones were needed at the front. For all other munitions they would improvise.

In the seventies there was a popular sit-com that poked fun at them with gentle (British?) humour – which many veterans said caught the spirit of the home guard. Not up there with Fawlty Towers or Rising Damp – but amusing nevertheless.

But no humour or integrity for the Honi Gárda – probably a battalion to harass refugees. Those who can do (emigrate) those who can’t – soldier.

https://youtu.be/Fbhbmgq5x2s

Guest

When you only use absolutes, Arkos (!) You soon run out of nuance! – as you appear to have done.

Jean P.
Guest

Charlie
Orban does not itend to create something like the British Home Guard. It is the German SA he has in mind. He will get rid of it if by the help of TEK if it gets out of control like the SA did.

Guest

This is a better ‘Dad’s Army’ video – the BBC are blocking them – but this includes the theme tune – if not the graphic, which used to introduce the program.

https://youtu.be/wic1fq6GIwY

Guest

Re: the German SA

With the direction Magyarorszag is going one would have to really pay attention when VO gets into ‘military’ and ‘patriotism’ matters. VO indeed has pretty much shown he can veer off from going in certain directions. Like Lotto hey you never know where things can wind up.
One day down the road the term ‘bodyguard’ may crop up out of a dream. Just saying.

Guest

And maybe a portent of what awaits if numbers do take off in the army? Sgt Bilko always knew how to make a buck…;-)….

http://youtu.be/d_MPah6wRNM

Guest

You must be Hungarian? Dribbling with anti-Semitism.

Plenty of your type in Hungary.

Probably Majga Guarda! With a large paunch and the brain the size of a pea.

Wouldn’t you prefer kuruc.hu?

(Orban and his crew are unreformed communist btw – they all had special clearance to travel on those special passports – communism is in their DNA.)

Guest

I wonder who will fund Orbán’s private army? Putin or the EU?
Whichever it is, he will not just be inculcating children into his sick idea of patriotism, but will have created a dictatorship in the midst of Europe.

Geppo
Guest

France is organizing sort of national guard to help police in their present situation.
The debate about it seems wise and realistic.
As far as i read in marianne.net they are not involving schoolage children ( but they are studying sort of connection with the army.
In Italy there is no need for a national guard as there are large and popular organisation of retired alpin troops and army and police ones.
There was a big problem with former jugoslavia gangs raiding violently thousands of country houses so a lot of families started buying guns .
This is dangerous but helped stopping the number of raids .

webber
Guest

Debate is wise, yes, but the idea stinks I think.
What is it for? Can you answer that?

(Your comment about the former Yugoslavia is nonsense – but irrelevant here anyway)

Observer
Guest

Webber,
re: “about the former Yugoslavia” gangs

There are such problems, add Albanian and some Bulgarian ones.

webber
Guest

That was a problem in certain areas in the recent past. No more. I visit “former Yugoslavia” frequently. There is no more crime in (say) Serbia than there is in (say) Hungary. Indeed, there are fewer murders in Serbia and in Bosnia-H. now. The murder rate in Hungary is 1.5 In Serbia and Bosnia alike, it is 1.3. For Macedonia, the rate is a bit higher than Hungary (1.6). For Croatia, it is much lower (0.8).

All these assumptions about former Yugoslavia are based on things that happened in the 1990s and very start of 2000s. Everything has changed.

Albania still has those problems. Serbia, Bosnia, and Macedonia, no. The police have been very effective there (n.b. gun ownership is still much higher in Serbia than Hungary – but that is in part traditional: gun ownership was much easier and more common in Tito’s Yugoslavia than in Kádár’s Hungary)

webber
Guest
Observer
Guest

What Geppo meant was gangs of those (YU, ALB BG) people operating in Italy.

webber
Guest

Okay – then the comment becomes even more ridiculous.
So what?
There are gangs of Italian people operating in the US. They are collectively called Cosa Nostra. They have killed a LOT of people.
Should America expel all Italian-Americans, or set up tougher border-checks against Italians?
This is an issue for law-enforcement, not for immigration, and certainly not for the armed forces (which was what Geppo was talking about).

Guest

And in Germany the Italian Mafia is also very active, drugs and murders – so maybe we should close all pizzerias and send the Italians home?

webber
Guest

Well, you can count on one thing: After they get this thing up and running, they’ll announce that unemployment has fallen again.
If they don’t get enough volunteers, I would not be a bit surprised if they made this compulsory for unemployed young people.
Then there is the possibility of a general draft.
A couple of Fideszniks have said that they feel eliminating the draft was one of the worst mistakes made by post-communist governments (Socialists eliminated it, if I recall correctly).
But if they reintroduce the draft, expect MASSIVE protests. What people did during the internet tax protests will be as nothing compared with an anti-draft movement.

webber
Guest

I will say this – one of the most eager-to-learn people I ever met was a very low-ranking officer in the Hungarian army. All you had to do was mention some book, article, or author as “important,” and she read it. She mentioned she had a lot of time to read while on guard duty, but I am sure that a lot of people spent their time on guard duty playing video games. Not her. She also happened to be a Gypsy, and a great Hungarian patriot in the best sense.

Hank
Guest

I talked to a retired Hungarian general recently who told me that indeed the current army of 25.000 has only 4- to 5-thousand fighting soldiers, while the rest of the force, that is 80% of it, consists of either administrative staff (15-thousand or so), or commanding officers. Which means this ridiculous ‘army’ has more or less as many generals, colonels, majors and captains as it has actual soldiers.

webber
Guest

Yep – As many officers as soldiers, and a “Staff” which is as big as the field army.
Hungaricum!

Guest

It’s a well used ruse by Orban – by co-opting civil duties into the ‘army’ then you can include their ‘gdp’ into the ‘spend’ of the military – and present a bigger figure, for example to NATO.

They don’t even have to be in uniform – just do the daily job and “look I’m in the army!”.

Trump has made it a mission to reduce the US cost – by insisting that countries contribute the required 2% of GDP to NATO – and Hungary comes nowhere close – and has never done.

(O/T – In my boyhood family talk we would often (!) ask “Have you trumped?” whenever there was a suspicious odour in the air (well I am an identical twin!). So ‘trump’ in my lexicon has always meant ‘fart’ – (which is amusingly defined in the Shorter Oxford Dictionary as ‘an explosion between the rump’ – something we as schoolboys learned looking for rude words in our newly acquired compulsory dictionary! To many in England, therefore, ‘Trump’means fart! How appropriate!)

Left, right, left, right,left, right………(and no trumping!)

Guest

In Germany we say of an organisation like this:

It has more chiefs than Indians …

Btw that new Fidesznik lunatic commenting here represents nicely the “Spirit of Fidesz and Jobbik”!

But I think the creature should be banned …

Member

Yes, the creature should be banned, and its spoor incinerated.

HS is a unique, invaluable forum for outing Orban’s depredations but the tone that is sometimes allowed into the anonymous comments (presumably out of a wish to display the low levels of mentation and morality that prevail elsewhere) does not (in my opinion) have its desired effect but the opposite. It just drags the discussion down to the level of Alex Jones, “InfWars” and KurucHu and awards the malicious misfits at the tail end of the Bell Curve yet another outlet with which to soil.

It also, alas, draws some of the otherwise rational and well-informed commentators down to the level of these bottom-feeding creatures — of whom there are already more than enough among both Orban’s and Trump’s hardcore deplorables.

webber
Guest

“The current plan is to increase the military budget by 0.1% each year. That means that the country will reach the level of military spending during Gyurcsány’s last year in office only in 2022.”

I assume that the increase in the budget will be in forints. If that is correct, then a 0.1% annual increase in the budget will not even keep pace with inflation.

Guest

Good point!

webber
Guest

8th grade history textbooks already include some sentences about Viktor Orbán. 5th graders are already given the “National Faith” catechism (nemzeti hitvallás), neatly bound in a small easy-to-carry format. Kids are already taught all about how great Hungary is in geography from a very early age.
Apparently that is not enough for Fidesz.
What more do they want?

pappp
Guest

Kids loyal to Fidesz obviously. Fidesz realized that education and propaganda are key and if they worked for Stalin (Stalin is still one of the most popular Russian/Soviet historic figures) so they will work for Orban too. It was a long term project.The left-wing never countered this ideological movement especially as it ceded power without any fight to parochial schools – now educating at least 1/3 of high school students, probably closer to 40% in rural provinces. Basically the left-wing gave up ideology, that is Istvan Hiller, Balint Magyar and his friends, I guess even they don’t know why. They just though this was a post-ideological world. They believed their own bullshit. So it was natural that Fidesz-Jobbbik used this vacuum out. Right now students at any university have a strong ‘national feeling’. Without the nationalism angle kids simply cannot be engaged with politics (except for some Budapest liberal minority). This is why the Hungarian left-wing cannot engage the kids, parties without emphasizing the fundamental importance of ‘the Nation’ can’t get any traction. Jobbik and Fidesz still rule the universities, as of late 2016.

Guest

Jobbik and Fidesz still rule the universities

Considering the abysmal ranking of the Hungarian universities that’s not something to be proud of …

This is just increasing the brain drain!

webber
Guest

You are behind the times (again). Things have changed a lot since 2014.
Fidesz no longer “rules” among university students.
A few still join Fidelitas in hopes of a career, but the mood now is of deep, deep disgust and mistrust of Fidesz. It is very strong – and I don’t mean just in Budapest. Being in Fidesz is not only not “cool” among university students, it is considered disgusting now.

pappp
Guest

That was one of my statements, the other was the nation issue, which is left totally unaddressed by left-wing politics. I was trying to find the recent interview I read on the topic (including party preferences) a few weeks ago, but couldn’t find it easily. The point is that even pro-EU kids see the EU from the point of view of the nation, as we vs. the EU etc. The left-wing is nonexistent in this ideology, in this discourse of ‘the nation’. As to Fidesz and Jobbik, they are still popular among those who have a party preference (I happen to know a few families whose kids at Budapest universities are still big Fidesz supporters, Jobbik being to “proli” for them)- admittedly most kids are not political which means they leave the matters in the hands of HÖK, Identitesz and other organizations who take community more seriously.

webber
Guest

I’m telling you – Fidesz is hugely unpopular among university students now. Yes, there are a few Fideszniks among students still. It would be remarkable if there weren’t. It isn’t even worth mentioning that you personally know one or two (your personal – former? – afilliation with the R. comes through all the time).
FYI
HÖK at ELTE is almost 100% Jobbik. Does that mean Jobbik is popular at ELTE? No. (it is more popular than Fidesz now, though).
At other universities it is 100% Fidesz. And does that mean Fidesz is popular at those universities? No.
So, how can unpopular parties control HÖK? Simple:
Before elections, sitting HÖK leaders nominate candidates for HÖK offices. They and only they invite people to join HÖK, and they only invite people who “like” Fidesz, Naturally, only people who demonstrate faithfulness to the Party (often through volunteer work) can run for HÖK office. So, students vote in elections that are rigged for Fidesz at the start – and they generally do not know that, because HÖK is clever enough not to mention that they filter people based on political preferences.

Fidesz

Guest

Pappp, you really should lay off your mantra “Hungarian left-wing” – the parties a d people to the left of Fidesz/Jobbik (you know, to the right of them is only the wall …) are very diverse!

And actually Orbán and Fidesz owe much more to Stalin than the “Hungarian left-wing” …

Observer
Guest

Jean P.

Spot on, I bet these are planed to be SA browshirts.

“Nemzeti” posturing aside, Orban probably picked up another dated idea from the Hungarian past: the “munkásőrség”, the workers guard of he communist regime.
These are not expensive – just a police baton / AK47 and some ideological brainwashing.

Istvan
Guest
As I have posted before numerous Hungarian soldiers and officers have trained with US forces, in particular with the Ohio National Guard. We even had several Hungarian officers in training at Rock Island Arsenal (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Island_Arsenal ) where I served for many years. The Hungarian Army command is highly familiar with our reserve and National Guard structure. They are also familiar with the Russian reserve forces which are largely useless and consist of several million military reservists consisting of ex-servicemen, but they do little training as there are restrictions on how often they can be called up. Chief of Staff General Creighton W Abrams, and General DePuy in the late 1970s played an important role in creating the current structure of our planned use of combined active, reserve, and National Guard forces. Hungary does not have the funding to pay reservists sufficiently to highly motivate them and maintain a high state of readiness. My youngest daughter who is now an Army Reserve Major for two weeks of training each year and one weekend each month gets paid a base of about $11,800 a year along with additional funding for her PhD program at the Univ. Of California at Davis and bonus… Read more »
Bowen
Guest

Off topic, but related to the recent MTA article. Remember Petra Laszlo? That camera woman who tripped over a Syrian father holding his child?

Her career is doing very well in Hungary.
http://444.hu/2016/10/17/laszlo-petra-dijat-vett-at-lezsak-sandortol-a-lakiteleki-filmszemlen

Guest

Petra Laszlo looks to be the poster child of illiberalism. She appears to be made into a model for all who espouse the creed to emulate. An example par excellence. Such a topsy turvy Magyarorszag. Sheesh.

webber
Guest

Quite an achievement. A couple of weeks ago the news came through that she was being prosecuted. Now she’s been given an award with a pile of money, and apparently positions in Fidesznik film studios.

Obserbver
Guest

The Fidesz communists and criminals are different, i.e. they are heroes and benefactors, by decree.

Obserbver
Guest

Tnx Bowen.

That’s a nice proof what kind of regime is ruling Hungary today, for those who might have any doubts. The list of contributors to the award is a list of the fascist media.

bimbi
Guest

This reads like a crisis to me. At least as a stop-gap measure, Orban could order the various private armies around Budapest to face the Turrist Threat situation. The “private armies” I refer to are his own pride-and-joy, the TEK, then comes Matolcsi’s Militia with its 220,000 shells and after that the Kover Korps, now surely ranking in the thousands and who nominally defend parliament (although parliament only needs to be defended from Orban, Kover and Fidesz). There must be more – one sees so many sub-branches of the police rushing around in cars with the sirens blaring. One suspects, however, that this is not to deal with any external threat, nor to make a respectable contribution to NATO, but what shall we say, primarily for internal security purposes…

webber
Guest

I’m sure you are right. But what are our Great Leaders going to do, I wonder, when I realize that individual members of their elite forces MIGHT NOT be completely committed to the Party and the Great O?
It’s a real problem….
After all, policemen are people too. Their kids have to go through the Party’s educational system, in classrooms that are falling behind. Their loved ones have to be treated in hospitals that are falling to pieces. And their relatives are moving abroad to get jobs that pay enough to let them survive.

What to do, what to do?
I know! Make a new army of internal security people to watch the others!!! That should do the trick.
But then, what if those guards aren’t entirely faithful to the Great O and the Party?…

armando
Guest

Venezuela should’ve experienced a coup months if not years ago, but the military just as other state institutions are still firmly behind the leader. The country is literally falling apart, even basic food staples are more difficult to come by than in the Soviet Union but the military backs Maduro as on day one. It’s a question of proper selection of the personnel.

Guest

Have you mentioned Venezuela because it contains an ‘e’ just as in Hungary. And a ‘u’ – yes there’s one in Hungary too. Oh! And an ‘a’! Oh goodness even an ‘n’.

Well what do you know?

There’s a lot more in common afterall.

webber
Guest

Nobody in their right mind would welcome a coup in Hungary. All I am suggesting is that O and his minions might not be able to count on their praetorian guard to attack peaceful citizens.

Guest

You know that depends on ‘situations’. I’d suggest there are Sejanuses always lurking for their time in the spotlight behind the ‘Emperor’. In my opinion that is a hard fact to deny in political administrations.

bimbi
Guest

@FideszHorkos, 7:24 pm

Gosh, you must have got to the wrong website – we don’t need any Republican presidential candidate campaigning on this web site. Éljen a Part!

Guest

Re: ‘indoctrination of youth’

Perhaps the slogan is ‘Get’em while they’re young’. That’s a window of opportunity which doesn’t stay open too long. From the looks of it I am not too sure Magyar youth is enamored with the military. I believe the army has been trying to do a ‘selling’ job for a while. It’s arguable that the campaign has worked.

Istvan
Guest
Yes of-course all major nations attempt to effectively familiarize youth in military culture and lore. For example America’s Army is a tactical multiplayer first-person shooter game owned by the U.S. government, financed through U.S. tax dollars and distributed free by the U.S. Army as a global public relations initiative to present a positive image of the current U.S. Army and help with U.S. Army recruitment. The best recruiter is the family, the Harvard Kennedy School of Government has a paper on this https://research.hks.harvard.edu/publications/workingpapers/citation.aspx?PubId=9789&type=WPN In many nations there is effectively a warrior caste and it is inner generational. In Hungary the transmission of lore about war and military service is often one of horror. The 209,000 Second Army was the best-equipped Hungarian formation at the beginning of WWII, but was virtually eliminated as an effective fighting unit by overwhelming Soviet force during the Battle of Stalingrad, suffering 84% casualties. There were also 50,000 Jewish forced laborers assigned to the 2nd Army 80% of the Jewish forced laborers never returned home, falling prey to battle, disease, Soviet captivity and outright murder at hands of Hungarian soldiers. Among the lucky Hungarian Army survivors I doubt many would recommend to their grandchildren service in… Read more »
Guest

Re: ‘Among the lucky Hungarian Army survivors I doubt many would recommend to their grandchildren service in the modern Hungarian Army’

And I certainly can understand that. What I have a hard time understanding is why VO believes he needs to sell ‘patriotism’ to the electorate unless he sees a great yawning weakness. A reflection of his tight-fisted government or something else?

It appears that there is no intrinsic need of citizens in the country wanting to serve of their own volition. It’s as if it almost has to be imposed and inculcated from above. I would think love of country indeed is reflected in the participation of a country’s armed forces. What’s with perhaps that ‘love?’ Seems like it’s getting stifled in more than one facet of the country.

Geppo
Guest

Dear wolfi 7777
Of course you are right as for the origin of some of the dangerous mafias.
Thousands of people from yugoslavia and even almost a million people settled in italy.
This is different from reacting against outlaws .
Of course there are emergencies .
A lot of paramilitary armed disbanded people from the yugoslav civil war have been raiding country houses and it was a violent period with innocent victims.
There was a try by a right wing party to form sort of militia patrols.
This could be very dangerous . The local people chose other solutions.
I hope that in germany you’ll succeed in defeating mafias because that could help us a lot.
Ps
by the way the yugoslav civil war started when the german governement recognized slovenian secession too quickly.

Guest

Are you crazy?

The Italian mafia has nothing to do with Yugoslavia – it’s been in existence for a very long time!
And it had a connection to the Christian Democrat party – remember Andreotti?

tappanch
Guest

More money for Orban to waste & steal:

The European Union will pay an extra 0.70 billion euros to Hungary immediately.
(from the 2007-2013 EU budget)

The 0.16 billion euros in fines for uncompetitive practices will be paid from future payments.

http://www.portfolio.hu/unios_forrasok/gazdasagfejlesztes/megvan_a_nagy_hordereju_brusszeli_dontes_szazmilliardokat_kap_magyarorszag.4.238861.html

tappanch
Guest

Pecina is in Budapest to sell 17 (check the number) regional dailies and other magazines (minus the discontinued largest daily Nepszabadsag) to Orban’s Strohman.

It is shameful that none of the officials in the Competitiveness Office said no to dictator Orban.

http://hvg.hu/kkv/20161018_Eldolt_a_Mediaworks_sorsa_Budapesten_targyalt_Heinrich_Pecina

regional newspapers :
Új Dunántúli Napló
Heves Megyei Hírlap
Komárom-Esztergom megyei 24 Óra
Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok megyei Új Néplap
Somogyi Hírlap
Tolnai Népújság
Békés Megyei Hírlap
Bács-Kiskun megyei Petőfi Petőfi Népe

new additions:

Fejér Megyei Hírlap
Dunaújvárosi Hírlap
Veszprém megyei Napló
Vas Népe
Zalai Hírlap

others :
Nemzeti Sport
Világgazdaság,
Vasárnap Reggel

vg.hu
Hírmátrix.hu
BAON.hu, BAMA.hu, BEOL.hu, HEOL.hu, SONLINE.hu, KEMMA.hu, SZOLJON.hu,
TEOL.hu

Guest

He probably got an offer he couldn’t refuse …

Btw, of our neighbours only one has a subscription to the local daily – the others all rely on the free weekly advertising papers …

giff
Guest

Where do you live tappanch? The Competition Office receives orders by phone from the Prime Minister’s office. I kid you not. It’s totally subordinate to Orban-Lázár. Hungary is not a democracy. Get used to it.

Geppo
Guest

Dear Wolfi7777what you say as mafia being a different problem from civil war in jugoslavia is exactly what i’m saying.
We were discussing the idea of setting up national guards that is surfacing in different countries.
Every country in europe has different reasons and problems.
In france that’s islamic terrorism, in italy the idea briefly surfaced not in connection with the regular immigration from yugoslavia,albania and rumenia but as an answer to a huge number of criminal attacks from disbanded paramilitary criminal gangs from former war theaters in jugoslavia.
The idea of setting up a militia coming from a political party was rejected but of course the people in the isolated villages and farms got organized alongside the state police to stop the killings and the raids.

webber
Guest

A National Guard is entirely different from local law enforcement.

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