Orbán: “one of the greatest virtues is to know where one’s place is”

Anyone who has the patience to sit through 40 minutes of a bad English translation of the joint press conference given by Vladimir Putin and Viktor Orbán can’t help noticing that the two politicians were not in the best of moods. Two years ago, during Putin’s last visit, Orbán was glowing. This time he was somber and so was Putin. Commentators who claim that the whole trip was nothing more than an opportunity for Putin to show that he is welcome in a country belonging to the European Union and for Orbán to demonstrate that he has an important ally were most likely wrong. Something happened during the negotiations between the two leaders that was disturbing, especially for Viktor Orbán.

But first, let’s see what issues the Russian partner wanted to discuss during Putin’s visit to Budapest. According to a summary issued by the Russian foreign ministry, from the Russian point of view the financing and construction of the Paks II Nuclear Power Plant extension had absolute priority. Rebuilding the old Soviet-made metro trains on the M3 line came next in importance, a project that is already underway. In addition, it looks as if Russia is eyeing the project of reconstructing the M3 line in lieu of the €120 million Hungary owes Russia as a result of the bankruptcy of the jointly owned MALÉV. Moscow also wants Hungary to show more interest in cultural matters pertaining to Russia. The ministry’s communiqué noted with satisfaction that there is a revival of interest in the Russian language. As for bilateral economic cooperation between the two countries, the document was vague.

Péter Szijjártó while in Moscow assured Sergey Lavrov of Hungary’s plans to promote Russian culture in Hungary. He announced that Leo Tolstoy will soon have a statue and a street named after him in Budapest. He revealed that the Hungarian government will spend a considerable amount of money on the restoration of three Orthodox churches in the country. As for Hungarian investments, Szijjártó specifically mentioned Hungarian technological investments in the field of agriculture and construction. In addition, he brought up a few projects allegedly under construction and financed by the Hungarian Eximbank.

Not mentioned among the items Hungary is offering to Russia was a memorial that was just unveiled in Esztergom. Even though if Orbán had a free hand he would gladly remove the Soviet memorial on Szabadság tér (Freedom Square), his government accepted a statue, “The Angel of Peace,” done by a Russia sculptor, Vladimir Surovtsev. The statue was erected in Esztergom because it was in the outskirts of that city that, during World War I, a huge camp for prisoners of war was set up. More than 60,000 soldiers–Russians, Serbs, and Italians–spent years there, at first in miserable conditions. Cholera took many lives. To erect a memorial to commemorate the dead and the sufferers is certainly appropriate. What is less logical is that the Russian NGO responsible for the project insisted on including a reference to the soldiers of the Red Army who died in and around Esztergom during 1944-1945. In any event, Vladimir N. Sergeev, Russia’s ambassador in Budapest, said at the ceremony: “It is symbolic that the unveiling of the statue takes place at the time of the Russian president’s visit to Hungary. This shows how important and how strong our cooperation is.”

Perhaps, but it may not have been on display during the meeting between Putin and Orbán, especially when they were discussing Paks II. That the financing of the nuclear power plant was on the agenda was most likely a fact that Viktor Orbán was not eager to share with the public. But his Russian friend practically forced him to reveal it. It was not a friendly gesture.

Let me describe the circumstances in which the incident took place. A journalist from the by-now completely servile Origo asked Viktor Orbán whether the question of financing Paks II was discussed during the conversation. The reason for his question was the Hungarian government’s repeated assertion that by now Hungary could, unlike back in 2014, finance the project on the open market at a lower interest rate than Hungary is currently paying on the Russian loan. János Lázár, head of the prime minister’s office, in fact indicated that the government was ready to renegotiate the deal. As it stands now, in the first seven years the interest rate on the loan is 4.50%, for the second seven years it is 4.80%, and in the last seven years it is 4.95%. According to Népszava’s calculation, the interest on the loan is approximately 300 billion forints a year, or one percent of Hungary’s GDP.

Orbán flatly denied that the question of financing (or refinancing) had come up. However, about one minute later when Putin took over from Orbán, he announced that he had “informed the prime minister that Russia is ready to finance not only 80% but even 100% of the project.” So, he contradicted Orbán, practically calling his host a liar. It seems that the Hungarian request or demand to renegotiate the loan was discussed and rejected. Instead, Putin offered him an even larger loan by way of compensation.

Perhaps here I should bring up a baffling statement that Orbán made. When he was asked by the reporter from MTV’s M1 about the two countries’ cooperation in the international arena, Orbán’s answer was: “Russia and Hungary move in different dimensions when it comes to geopolitical, military, and diplomatic questions. To my mind, one of the greatest virtues is to know where one’s place is.” Is it possible that this rather bitter observation had something to do with Orbán’s less than pleasant conversation with Putin? Did he realize that there is no way out of Putin’s deadly embrace? Perhaps.

Of course, it is possible that Orbán, who is not the kind of man who readily admits that he made a mistake, will just go on merrily forging even closer relations with Russia. On the other hand, he may realize that he is not in a position to be a successful mediator between Russia and the rest of the western world.

As usual, it is hard to tell where Orbán stands only a day or two after his meeting with Putin. He was one of those EU leaders who “pledged the need for unity and for Europe to stand on its own two feet” at the European Council summit in Valletta, Malta yesterday even though before his arrival he announced that the U.S. has the right to decide its own border control policy and that “he is puzzled at the ‘neurotic European reactions’ over the travel ban.” Nonetheless, behind closed doors he joined the others who were united in their condemnation of Donald Trumps’ comments and attitudes toward the European Union. François Hollande was one of the most vocal critics of Trump at the meeting and, when asked what he thought of EU leaders who are leaning toward Trump, he said that “those who want to forge bilateral ties with the U.S. … must understand that there is no future with Trump if it is not a common position.” Orbán should understand that, having lost his battle with Putin over the financing of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. We will see how he decides.

February 4, 2017
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Ovidiu
Guest

Orban discovers now the hard way why countries as Poland and Romania are so “Russophobes”. To get yourself involved with Russia is to end up being swallowed and transformed into a Russian guberniya. You end being a reflection (a strange one as it may be but nonetheless) of the Russian nation and the Russian culture.
It is not a 20th century (Soviet) phenomenon, it was the same in the past (the Tsarist Empire) and it has not changed with Putin. What starts as seemingly a contract and a negotiation ends up in a deadly embrace where you have to surrend everything to Moscow.

wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘….to know where one’s place is’

There you have it. A phrase promulgating a nation having the psychology of wearing cement shoes and with blinkers over the eyes to boot. Orban apparently believes the shoe fits so he wears it. In the face of a close ‘gravitational pull’ he offers a willing obeisance thus limiting the horizon for the future for the country. The sadness is that it is self-imposed. The effects of defeat certainly seem to play well in the Magyar psyche. And the Russians continually burrow into it.

webber
Guest

Perhaps Putin reminded Orban that copies of all communist-era secret police files are stored in Moscow, including Orban’s personal file.

Istvan
Guest
Is it really possible that Orban has had an epiphany in relationship to Putin? Does he suddenly grasp that NATO and the EU will very possibly not protect Hungary and that there is no way out of Putin’s deadly embrace as Eva perceptively suggests. Like Eva I have a hard time believing this, but given President Trump’s interview to be aired tonight in the USA where the President informs Bill O’Reilly of his understanding of Putin it is indeed possible. Here is Fox News summary of this part of the interview: O’Reilly asked Trump whether he “respects” the former KGB agent, “I do respect him, but I respect a lot of people,” Trump said, “That doesn’t mean I’m going to get along with him. Trump said he would appreciate any assistance from Russia in the fight against ISIS terrorists, adding that he would rather get along with the former Cold War-era foe than otherwise. “But, [Putin] is a killer,” O’Reilly said. “There are a lot of killers,” Trump responded, “We’ve got a lot of killers. What do you think? Our country’s so innocent?” Well that is without question true and that type of blunttruth is indeed what endears Trump to… Read more »
wrfree
Guest

Re: would the US protect Magyarorszag from Russian aggression?

I’d suggest if Russia invaded it would be sadly a horrendous day for the United States if she diverged from NATO principles. Even Trump would know that to do that
would fly in the face of what he represents namely the leader of the democratic world. Not to do anything would do egregious damage to the reputation of the US and its character. If Orban worries maybe he thinks he has been bad boy.

Istvan
Guest

President Trump is not interested in being the leader of the democratic world, he represents a nationalist movement that puts only the interests of the United States first. I think the President made that very clear in his inaugural speech. He wasn’t joking, President Trump and his team are implemented this nationalist perspective on a daily basis.

wrfree
Guest

Just OT..

The genius of Brady and Belichick together will go on to overtake the Falcons tonight…😄

The two are exceptional in devising strategies of not letting an opponent do what they do best. And on that perhaps Trump and the Magyar left could use’em both in their game plans. 😎

petofi
Guest

Belichick is indeed a genius, but you forget one thing: super bowl games are sometimes fixed (ie. Panthers vs Broncos was a ridiculous example). In this year’s case, the NFL bureaucracy would hate to reward Belichik and Brady after the deflagate scandal. Be prepared to see a few flags on key plays…

wrfree
Guest

petofi …For a moment there you were really on the money with ‘flags’. The Falcs couldn’t keep their hands to themselves. I thought the Patriots could capitalize. If you’re watching. It was 21-3 to start the 3rd. As I write it’s 28-3. And it sure got ‘late’ early….🙀🙀🙀. Could be ‘good night nurse’ for Tommy and his boys…😎

wrfree
Guest

Wow. The Falcs have gone on to a requiem.

petofi
Guest

There must be an Atlanta offensive coordinator who will be looking for a high school job tomorrow.

Sure, the Pats were coming back but they couldn’t have completed the job unless that particular coach had a brain fart and called three passing plays from the Pat’s 23 yard line with three minutes left. I guess he failed high school math…because, if he just ran the ball three times up the middle, and then kicked a 30 yard field goal…well bless my undies, but I swear the Falcons would’ve been up by 11 points with about 2.5 minutes left. And there was no way back from that!

(Funny thing, but commentators are so hyped on being “positive”…that I didn’t hear one negative comment on that. And it was asinine
to the max.)

wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘There must be an Atlanta offensive coordinator who will be looking for a high school job tomorrow’

Haha.. Could be! You know this could be a case of counting the csirkeket mielott kikeltek…😎😎😎😎

petofi
Guest

Now, what is serious is the ‘reality shaping’ that is going on: not one mention of Atlanta’s idiot plays with 3 minutes left–not on tv, not even in Atlanta newspapers.

What gives??

wrfree
Guest

I think the shock would kill them to ‘replay’ the game with the days after quarterbacking!

And one thing that can be immediately seen in the play of Brady and his team is that they can play ‘in the clutch’. My colloquial Magyar would sure improve if there’s a translation for that. I think I can come close to it in Ingles but not in Magyar.

pappp
Guest

Interesting article on Orban, Putin etc. by the Russian The insider.

Unfortunately I can’t seem to link the Hungarian translation which is available on csehszlovakkem.tumblr.com (I guess due to the cyrillic letters in the url).

http://theins.ru/korrupciya/43801

FreeWheeling
Guest

“Péter Szijjártó while in Moscow assured Sergey Lavrov of Hungary’s plans to promote Russian culture in Hungary. He announced that Leo Tolstoy will soon have a statue and a street named after him in Budapest.”

Actually there has long been a prominent statue and a nice pathway in the Városliget of Tolstoy near the rubble of the former Közlekedési Múzeum:

https://russianlandmarks.wordpress.com/2015/03/05/leo-tolstoy-bust-budapest-hungary/

Mind you that the Városliget is already a monument to OV’s obsequious ways with their tribute to Kazakhs with Asztana sétány (Astana is their capital) and the large bust of the Abai Kunanbayev, the Kazakh folk hero. Why this was done earlier this decade when such matters means so very little to Hungarians, I don’t know, but I suspect that like a lot of public expenditures it has to do with some prominent persons’ private bank accounts.

petofi
Guest

“..what it has to do with…”

More pointedly, what it has to do with is Orban’s in-your-face hate for Budapesters, indeed, for all Hungarians…

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