Charles Gati: “Even the most talented diplomat cannot sell junk”

This is a translation of an interview with Charles Gati, senior research professor of European and Eurasian Studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, which originally appeared in Magyar Narancs on April 20, 2017 under the title “You cannot circumvent the elite.” The English translation was published by The Budapest Sentinel on April 24.

Hoyt Brian Yee, Deputy State Secretary at the United States Department of State, was recently in Budapest to meet with the Hungarian government. While here he also raised the issue of Central European University (CEU), and confirmed to the press that Fiona Hill, Donald Trump’s advisor responsible for Russian and European affairs, also supports the CEU matter. Is the university remaining also important to Trump?

What I know is that the State Department agreed with the White House, and that in the White House the National Security Council, which deals with matters of foreign policy and security, supported advocating for the university to a great extent. Of course, this does not mean that the president personally requested this — it’s good if an American president devotes half an hour a year to Hungary. He wouldn’t have time for any more. Hungary’s significance in American politics today is minimal.

What changes have taken place to the State Department since the new president took office?

There are fifty or sixty positions at the State Department filled by political appointees. They have started assuming their positions. However, there is no change in those officials who deal with Hungary in the European department. One or two might be transferred. These experts continue their work independent of the person of the president or party. Deputy Secretary Yee is such an official and counts as the most important operative person in this field. He holds the same position now as at the time of Obama.

The Hungarian government recently recalled Réka Szemerkényi who represented our country to Washington the past two years. What is your view of the ambassador’s work?

Even the most talented diplomat cannot sell junk. An ambassador can stand on her head and it would be of no significance since the experts here know precisely what the situation is in Hungary, how close the Hungarian government is to Putin, how much it tries to undermine the European Union, and how little it contributes to the cost of NATO. I see lobbying the same way: it may be that, of the 535 congressmen, one or two manage to issue a statement. The vast sums of money spent on this by the Hungarian government is actually a complete waste.

What do you think explains the fact that in recent weeks the American president has acted in a manner diametrically opposed to what he promised during the campaign?

The most important question these days is really how long Trump’s political somersault will last. There have been as many changes in a week as Orbán — an ultraliberal in his youth — in a decade. Moreover, among the fresh changes are a number that pertain to Hungary. Trump wooed Putin during the campaign, mentioning him as a potential friend of America. And yet he incurred the anger of the Russian leadership by ordering the bombing of the Syrian airport. One of the most important statements of the campaign was that America would move its embassy from Tel-Aviv to Jerusalem. These days we don’t hear anything about this. There was also talk that Hillary Clinton should be imprisoned. But these days he has to be more concerned that it is his people who will end up behind bars. A few days was enough to persuade himself that NATO is not a thing of the past. All of this indicates that the president is starting to move in the direction of the traditional foreign policy of the Republican Party. But in the Republican Party there are two truly important directions. The one is the conservative line near to Wall Street, which back in the day was more or less represented by George W. Bush. The other is the national line, whose nationalist rhetoric Trump made his own during the campaign. Although a nationalist direction won him the election, one senses more and more a Wall Street mentality in his politics. This is especially important from a foreign policy point of view since the direction opposes the politics of isolationism, which was one of the main program points on the side of the nationalists.

What could have caused the change? Did Trump realize that governance is more complicated than he thought? Or was he worried about getting into trouble after it turns out that many of his confidantes conspired with Russian leadership?

The majority of the people around him represent Wall Street: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Secretary of Defense James Mattis, and all the economic people. On the other side is the representative of the national side, Steve Bannon, who is more and more marginalized in the government. Trump did not understand politics when he assumed the presidency. In certain economic questions he was an absolute beginner, and he has woken up to this fact. The best example of this was when he said about the restructuring of the health-care system he “didn’t know that it was so complicated.” An unprepared and naive president assumed power in America, and now we are seeing a certain willingness to revise certain things.

But don’t these changes alienate him from those who voted for him?

It could easily be the case that sooner or later things go wrong with his electoral base. But it is not yet clear where this is leading, or what group of voters he is trying to win over.

In September 2012 Obama said he would interfere in Syria in the event chemical weapons were used. However, when he should have done so the following year, he stepped back instead. The Obama government explained this by saying that instead of a military attack it was using diplomatic means to persuade the Assad regime to give up chemical weapons. The chemical attack at the beginning of April indicates that the Syrian government retained these kinds of weapons. How does this reflect on Obama’s foreign policy?

In actuality this was the worst episode of Obama’s foreign policy. But when Trump went against his own promises, on the one hand he wanted to prove that he could fix the mistakes of his predecessor, and on the other demonstrate that the photos of destruction and the murdered children touched his soul. However, it is difficult to say whether any conclusions can be drawn from this regarding the foreign policy of the next months or years. The experts are now saying that this was a one-time strike and that we should not calculate with another intervention.

I cannot argue with this, but I have to say that I was personally affected when Trump responded in a human manner to the Syrian events. After all, children died, and it also turned out that Assad lied when he said he had given up all his chemical weapons. In my eyes, this increased Trump’s stature as a person, even if this action did not make him greater politically.

But is some sort of Middle East strategy starting to emerge from his actions? Not long ago he spoke about how he would like to repair US relations with the Gulf countries, and he provided support by telephone to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and supposedly distanced himself from moving the embassy to Jerusalem at the request of King Abdullah II of Jordan. All of this suggests that he is trying to contain Iran’s regional efforts, in alliance with the region’s Sunni leaders 

It is also difficult for me to say anything about the Middle East. A boastful, unprepared man assumed the White House who is incapable of delivering on what he promised. He campaigned on a promise to immediately terminate the Iran nuclear agreement, but he hasn’t done anything. He also said that he would take care of the Islamic State in a few days, but he had to wake up to the fact that this affair is much more complicated than he thought.

Construction of the wall planned for the Mexican border hasn’t started either.

Nevertheless, there are alarming developments here as the authorities are separating families. It is possible to hear a number of stories about parents whose children were born in the United States having no choice but to leave the country without them. This is the insensitive practice that is consistent with his promises. True, immigration policy did not become as cruel as many foretold during the campaign.

Today’s Trump believes China is no longer manipulating the yuan . . .

For now that is the most important change. After he met with President Xi Jinping, he said he understood why he doesn’t do more against North Korea, and he sees that this is a serious question. So there is some hope that relations with the world’s second-largest economy, which of course is still a dictatorship, will improve. This would be extremely important, because the world at this moment is perhaps more dangerous than at the time of the Cold War, and Chinese-American cooperation, which hopefully one day probably after Putin, Russia will also join, is our best hope for world peace in the coming years.

Is there no place for Europe in this constellation?

So long as the European Union is on the defensive and is this divided, it can only play a side role in matters of great strategy.

Who has the greatest influence over Donald Trump?

In many questions his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is the standard, but I would say that in foreign policy it is rather his National Security Advisor H. R. McMaster whose opinion counts. He thinks differently on many issues than the resigned Michael Flynn. McMaster is an old and respected member of the Washington national security elite.

This means that the current change in direction can be attributed to chance? If Flynn had not been compromised by his Russian connections, then would we be seeing a completely different American foreign policy?

These are not by chance. The decision to name such a serious and knowledgable person as McMaster in Flynn’s place was deliberate. The situation is that it is not possible to circumvent the Washington elite. Politics is a profession practiced by qualified people. It is not possible to charge in from New York’s Trump Tower and say we are reordering the world. The president also realized that power is limited. But it is important that the national side has not found sufficient support. Trump may have won the election but he received three million fewer votes than Hillary Clinton. His support is altogether 40 percent, which is far lower that of his predecessor during the first couple of months. The institutions are not giving in. A West Coast court was able to veto the ban on people arriving from Muslim-majority countries because even those sympathizing with Republicans clearly stated that the ban is unconstitutional. Congress rejected the law overwriting the health insurance system. The American press also uniformly condemns the Trump government. So American political culture is asserting itself, and the system of checks and balances is working well. Trump reacts to opposition by searching for more serious answers to the problems at hand.

The Guardian recently wrote that the Democratic Party is worsening its future chances by trying to drive out politicians practicing Bernie Sanders’ politics. The newspaper believes James Thompson of Kansas could have won a seat in Congress, but that the party did not even try to support his campaign, and this is why he failed.

I do not agree with this. In the state of Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff has a good chance of winning in an early election where so far Republicans have been the favorite. He, on the other hand, received a lot of support from the party. It is not as though the Democrats are that clever, but they benefit from Trump’s weakness even if there isn’t a fresh, new face behind which to line up party supporters. Sanders had a lot of followers. My oldest grandson also supported him, but my feeling is that he is a socialist. It is not possible to win an election in America with a social democratic program.

April 27, 2017
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Doggo
Guest
Charles Gati is a creature of the Democratic Party. His opinion would count for a lot in a Clinton administration, but under a Trump administration it is more than irrelevant it can be deeply misleading. How could a Democratic Party extreme partisan pretend to understand the mind of Donald Trump or his White House? I mean no offense but questions like “Who has the greatest influence over Donald Trump?” Should be asked. But Gati is not the right man to answer them. To answer questions like the above you have to ask people who are close to Donald Trump. Is Charles Gati close to Donald Trump to be able to answer this question? Charles Gati could be properly asked “who has the greatest influence over Hillary Clinton”. And he might know the answer or he might not. But pretending that Gati is close to Trump and able to answer such questions or those about Trump’s plans or policies is not credible I believe. Neither is it credible to think that Trump will simply continue policies of the Democratic Party in too many cases. In some cases he certainly might, but would Hillary Clinton nominate and appoint Gorsuch to the Supreme… Read more »
Member

Wow that’s pretty harsh, especially calling a person a “creature”(!) of a political party. Are you saying he didn’t earn his position at Johns Hopkins?

Regardless of his position within any current government, I believe his opinion is valuable just as a longtime political observer and political scientist. And FWIW I think his analysis is pretty spot-on. What specifically in his analysis do you take issue with?

Guest

Don’t try to reason with the doggy creature – it’s no use, fascists will always be fascists …

I find Mr Gati’s reasoning quite interesting, though I don’t know if all of it applies to a guy like Trump who seems similar to Orbán, without any understanding of politics and any human values at all!

Doggo
Guest

“I find Mr Gati’s reasoning quite interesting, though I don’t know if all of it applies to a guy like Trump ”

It doesn’t. Gati is not a member of Trump’s inner circle, Gati is not close to Trump, he doesn’t know anything about Trump except for reading the same newspapers and media reports that we all read.

Now if Gati was asked about the reasons why Hillary Clinton lost the election, or why Bernie Sanders lost the primary, he might have some inside information or unique perspective.

“no use, fascists will always be fascists …”

are you speaking about yourself, ” wolfi ” ? What an interesting name you have

Roderick Beck
Guest

American governments have an obligation to support American interests and that includes American universities. So far the American government has done just that. It has made quite clear that Hungary’s relationship with the United States depends on CEU being able to operate in Hungary under fair conditions. Donald Trump could not start abandoning American institutions without paying a political price. In your world everything is defined by tribe and that is all that matters. You might be a member of the Orbán tribe, the Jewish Communist tribe, the Soros tribe. That is your mentality. The developed world does not share it. In your mind these tribes are at war with each other and anything is justifiable to win the war. This is why Hungarians are not a modern people. Too many of them thinks in these primitive terms.

Doggo
Guest

You seem really delusional in your opinion about the Trump government. You think it will serve Soros interests at all costs. That is far from certain.

You suppose that the Trump government would serve as the vehicle of its own destruction. That Soros who gave 25 million dollars to Hillary for the campaign will get to run things, decide things. You are living in a world in which Hillary won the election.

Observer
Guest

Pretty idiotic this time

simca
Guest

Doggo is now assigned to this blog full time to oppose, undermine, cast doubt on everything, spread misinformation, conspiracy theories.

Doggo is a professional troll.

Doggo
Guest

It is interesting how the mind of ignorant people work. You presuppose that everyone in the world agrees with you in everything. If they don’t it must be a conspiracy against you personally.

Because you are so important. So special. You flatter yourself.

Member

Te parazita vagy, tünj el.

petofi
Guest

Doggo,
you are a rabid dog…

Roderick Beck
Guest

The conspiracy mentality is the trademark of Fidesz. It used to justify repression of the political competition. Fidesz and the Nation are One. Therefore to oppose Fidest is to be a traitor to Hungary.

Doggo
Guest

The conspiracy mentality is a trademark of people who think because a single person wrote a different opinion on a blog, there must be a conspiracy behind it. It is the trademark of the ignorant who think every single person must think as they think in every way.

Observer
Guest

Roderick

And they think of the world with their corrupt, vicious minds, i.e. assuming everyone is conspiring, cheating, thieving, etc as they do or would do.

Roderick Beck
Guest

The reality is that CEU is an American university and there is a 99% probability that the American government will support them. You are thinking like a Hungarian in terms of ‘us versus them’.

Member

I agree with every statement in this except the very last one. Bernie Sanders has won several elections in Vermont as a socialist. Moreover, he’s also the most popular politician in America by far, which is really quite remarkable.
http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/329404-poll-bernie-sanders-countrys-most-popular-active-politician

petofi
Guest

Bernie Sanders may be the most popular–I, too, favor him–but the powers-that-be will never let him get close to the Presidency.

One question that seems to elude the ‘eagle-eyed’ brigade like
Chis Matthews and Rachel Maddow is this: if the Russians have been accused of interfering on the side of the Republicans, has any research been done to see if they interfered with the Demoractic nomination on the side of Hillary?

petofi
Guest

(Because, as we all know, a dead bat could’ve beaten Hillary…)

wrfree
Guest
FYI y’all.. pushing ‘socialism/communism’ here is like showing a crucifix to Bela Lugosi…😎 Yes that urdog ‘bat’ will never fly. And on Mr. Gati’s comment regarding Magyarorszag ‘getting a half hour’. Kind of provides an allusion to North Korea. The US has been kicking that Korean can down the road for decades. They no doubt got a couple of minutes on the White House docket… ‘Things under control’. And now all of a sudden bang we are looking at dreaded ‘existential’ problems. Philosophy alas has caught up with us. We now could be fighting for our lives against a leader who has rabid bats in the belfry. Switch to Magyarorszag in the early 21st. Relatively speaking a blip on the radar in the matter of global affairs. Yet events in the country the past few years have shown it to be veering away decidely from backing the concept of liberties in the nation. It virtually has gone missing in promulgating good governance in the democratic tradition. And to boot it has become closer and closer to its former occupier and incorporating and executing its ‘interest’ philosophies. So for the West’s sake and liberty hopefully a few more minutes each day… Read more »
petofi
Guest

“Eyes Wide Shut”, the great Kubrick’s last movie, was about the power brokers behind the scenes. They’ve now been activated to take out Bernie Sanders by spreading mud over the reputation of his wife…

Bernie must be a serious threat to win in 2020!

wrfree
Guest

You know Stanley in my opinion wouldn’t flinch an eye on the ‘taking out’ of Sanders. He in his pix has always cast an explorative eye towards
the basest instincts and misbehavior as well as the ‘moral’ sense of humans. Thought Machiavelli should have been one of his subjects for his look at power after his ‘Napoleon’ never got off the mark.

petofi
Guest

@wrfree

Machiavelli

Don’t confuse Machiavelli with his subject: “The Prince” detailed how monarchs could best control their citizenry: he didn’t necessarily approve of the morality…

As for Kubrick, he often showed man’s base instincts (as in Paths of Glory or in Full Metal Jacket) but that doesn’t mean he promoted them.

(But we can discuss this when I get to Budapest in mid-May…)

wrfree
Guest

Very good. As for the pic on Mach if I think I know Stanley’s way of working he would produce something creative and innovative and about his subject. For one he’d exhaust his research and make sure he had enough to make a picture ‘his’ way….the autocratic auteur ..😎And of course that would include his most famous work which you noted! It is inseparable from the writer.

Roderick Beck
Guest

Please Petofi, stop the nonsense. Obama won because he offered a way forward without massive new government spending. Bernie is a dead end who has completely avoided the question of how to pay for his box of candy to the American people. A left wing populist is no better than a right wing populist.

Roderick Beck
Guest

Bernie Sanders would be crushed in a general election. The educated half of America is generally affluent and is clearly not prepared to shoulder the additional taxes required to build a social democratic state. I know lots of educated people who support gay rights, but would vote down anyone who increases their tax burden.

Istvan
Guest
General Mattis is only three years out of the US Marine Corp, he worked during that time for a organization that promotes retired General Officers as speakers at business conferences, he also had a spot on General Dynamics Board (a defense contractor), and a biotech firm. He played no role in Wall Street finance capital at all, so I baffled why Professor Gatti sees him as a representative of Wall Street in the Trump cabinet. Mattis is a globalist as opposed to being an isolationist, he is an honest American officer who recognizes Russia and China as co-threats to US global power. He is clearly opposed to the Steve Bannon camp of simplistic American first isolationists. His own historical interest in Empires and readings of the Mediations of Marcus Aurelius for example reflect a vision different than that of Wall Street financiers in my opinion, as does his nickname mad dog. I totally agree with Professor Gatti about his positive assessment of General McMaster and the importance of his appointment and role in containing the isolationist populist faction in the Trump administration. I don’t agree at all that President Obama’s worst foreign policy episode was his failure to enforce his… Read more »
wrfree
Guest

Re: Mattis and Aurelius

His interest in Aurelius is commendable as the latter strove for ‘wisdom’ in his life and duties. Aurelius also was sensitive to the great responsibilities of his position as Emperor-protector of the entire Roman world. His ‘Meditations’ come from the experience of ruling in a time of distress with great pressure impinging on the Empire. Mattis seems to have picked an appropriate and ancient ‘how-to’ book to guide him in executing his duties. He appears a thinking man’s general.

bimbi
Guest

We know that Hungarians, and the present government in particular, have a “Magyar-centric” view of the world, so Charles Gati’s words to put things in perspective are very appropriate at this time:

“…it’s good if an American president devotes half an hour a year to Hungary.”

The downside of this situation is that Orbán is free to continue his “rooster on the midden” exhibitionism and he and his “team” the rapacious rate of theft from the Hungarian people.
Two recent headlines make the point – Orbán’s Strohman now 5th richest Hungarian (up from 31st last year) and Matolcsy’s disgraceful business practices in the 1998 – 2002 government:
http://budapestsentinel.com/featured/how-central-bank-governor-gyorgy-matolcsy-enriched-himself-at-taxpayer-expense-part-i/

But those only got worse after 2010…

wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘rapacious rate of theft’

Ironic to think that an individual who is implicated with evil capital ist designs is looked upon with almost a fanatical hatred and yet is probably the one to have the best skills to jump start ‘prosperity’ in the country.

Problem is the rapacious stewards believe in the ‘not invented’ here syndrome. But they of course want to live in their own ‘Sherwood Forest’ and not forego the opportunity to have free reign to pillage the country and its Midas treasure chest.

petofi
Guest

@ Bimbi

“The downside of this situation…”

What responsibility does the US have toward the moronic Hungarian citizenry? If they don’t have the education to see that Orban is just a ‘szelhamos’ con artist…what can the US do?

bimbi
Guest

@petofi, 12:45 p.m.

“What responsibility does the US have toward the moronic Hungarian citizenry?”

Very little – which is exactly why the US president is unlikely to devote more time to Hungary than ½ hour/year, which says, if I may spell it out, that Hungary has very little importance on the world political stage – contrary to Magyar-centric convictions.

Observer
Guest

Nimbi

It’s total robbery, one of historical proportion – eg the reprivatisation of MKB bank, where a young salaryman drops HUF 30 billion to buy a stake, no question asked. https://444.hu/2017/04/27/a-444-szeretettel-es-tisztelettel-koszonti-magyarorszag-legujabb-milliardosat-balog-adamot
Try transferring 10 million cash and what the bank will ask.

wrfree

The grand robbery is the only “jump” – on the public wealth, that is.
Hungary has been slipping behind in almost all measurable areas – edu, health, growth, pensions, standard of living, innov R&D, emigration…
The “unorthodox” in the policies means they are not applying any of the measures known to work and, guess what, the others really don’t work. Actually the Orban gang is really focused on the robbery part.
I deeply hate them for the wrecking of the Hungarian society, democracy and economy too – Orban’s deep complexes and the unbridled greed of the bunch caused unnecessary damage, i.e. far beyond the scope of that caused by the “standard” corruption in Hun politics.

Guest
Good news? Not for the Hun government … Back to reality: CEU ranks second on the Times Higher Education’s list of universities with the highest percentage of international students. The list, published on April 26, features 200 universities around the world based on data collected for the World University Rankings. CEU currently has almost 1,500 students from 117 countries, and almost 14,000 alumni in 133 countries. http://bbj.hu/business/ceu-named-2nd-most-international-university-in-the-world-_132185 But that must be fake news – because the Times also says that all other Hungarian universities don’t make it on their lists afaik … In German we’d say they are under “ferner liefen …” Here’s the original article: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/universities-highest-percentage-international-students-named 77.4% international students – Vienna or any other city would be happy to accomodate these! And there’s more: Speaking at the University of East London on 26 April, Professor Ignatieff claimed that, in Hungary, “everyone who tries to help refugees is being criminalised”. “This is not social work,” insisted Professor Ignatieff, a historian and human rights scholar, who has held senior academic posts at Harvard University and the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and Toronto, and served as leader of Canada’s Liberal Party between 2008 and 2011. “We believe in these people [as students]… Read more »
Doggo
Guest

How many migrants do you house in your properties? Would you like to be forced to house migrants? If not why are you surprised that certain countries do not want to be forced to house migrants above and beyond what their own population accepts out of their free will. Just as you are not forced by arms to house migrants in your house a country does not want to be forced.

When you accept migrants out of your free will because it is your decision, everyone benefits. But force can not be used to change the ethnic composition of a country and Soros unfortunately supports forcing millions of migrants into Europe and taking out loans to pay for it.

In essence forcing the children of tomorrow to pay for the migrants of today.

Guest

“Just as you are not forced by arms to house migrants in your house a country does not want to be forced.”

Private house and country are not analogous.

petofi
Guest

What horseshit.
Migrants as a workforce are a net benefit to the country.
(Get your head out of Orban’s/Putin’s ass–)

Doggo
Guest

“Migrants as a workforce are a net benefit to the country.”

If that were true in every case Sweden and other countries could give free plane tickets and invite 10 million migrants directly, they have plenty of space.

If the migrants had plane tickets they do not need to go on foot or go by boats where many of them die.

Yet the Swedish and other countries do not give free plane tickets which could avoid the migrants dying in boats. Why not?

Do they not want the “net benefit” that you claim?

Roderick Beck
Guest

There is a country called American based in immigration. Turned out a lot better than Tribal Hungary.

wrfree
Guest

Also good for non-Americans to know that the country is really based on an ‘idea’. And was founded on the idea of ‘liberty’. First time ever. Hard to grasp of course for those with a little bit of the use of the boot in them. The ‘not invented’ here syndrome is alive and well.

Doggo
Guest

Roderick Beck :

“There is a country called American”

Do you support illegal immigration? Do you support the proposed wall on the southern border?

Member

I’m an immigrant myself. And I have a lot of immigrants in my home all the time. Have you?

webber
Guest

Yes, America the country of immigrants is so unsuccessful.

Roderick Beck
Guest

No one, blockhead, is suggesting that people be forced to house refugees. You just discredit yourself by lying because even minimally intelligent people know that no one is being forced to house immigrants.

Doggo
Guest

Except that’s completely false. If 50 million new migrants arrive in Europe due to an open door policy, where do you suppose they will live? On the streets? Someone will be forced to house them, like it or not.

And if you think 50 million might be a lot how much do you think it will be if god forbid there will be war between India and Pakistan?

Guest

Your crazy hate propaganda is getting unbearable – why don’t you speculate about a war between Russia and NATO?
That’s probably more realistic – and Hungary would be the fighting ground …

Observer
Guest

I’m forced to pay 27% VAT every day, to look at the lots of shabby Hungarian citizens, to look at the idiotic messages of Orban’s posters, to listen to the dumb explanations or to the cynical in-your face lies of various Fid parvenues dressed in 3000 dollar suites bought by the hapless dupes earning $ 700 a month.

I am forced to explain to foreigners how such a corrupt, fascist regime can remain in power here. How can refugees , children be forced to live in tents in freezing winter instead of being housed in the facilities deliberately closed. How can over 10 000, often shady characters, be allowed into the EU by lining the pockets of Orban mafia through the residency bond scheme.

I am forced to pay to the mafia min. 500 out of every 10 000 Ft I spend and pay more for gasoline than the Austrians, etc etc etc.

After all that what does it matter if 1400 people settle here, be it even every year?

Doggo
Guest

By the way I remember someone here falsely claimed that the “Soros Univeristy” does not exist.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/26/eu-launches-legal-action-against-hungary-higher-education-law-university

I would rather believe The Guardian which mentions the Soros University than some random commenter who knows very little.

When even The Guardian admits that there is a Soros University, you better believe the Soros University exists.

Member

Fuck off.

petofi
Guest

Albrecht,

Do you know what happens when you touch a pile of shit?
You get some on yourself…

petofi
Guest

“Brevity is the sould of wit.”

Guest

“I would rather believe The Guardian which mentions the Soros University….”

Quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus.

Guest

Did you read the article?
Of course the last sentence is translated wrong – O did not say:
Hungary is not an island. This is the land of freedom and we want to stay here.
He said:
We want the EU money
Btw the CEU is the only Hungarian university who made it into the top on the TIMES list:
https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/2017/world-ranking#!/page/0/length/25/sort_by/rank/sort_order/asc/cols/stats

Doggo
Guest

you don’t have to read the article. It talks about “Soros University” right in the title.

someone tried to deny that Soros University exists, but not only the Guardian but many other publication use the exact phrasing: “Soros University”.

And of course only yesterday Soros had a secret meeting with Juncker. Soros entered the building using some back door not the usual way guests enter the building. The whole press corps of course waited for his entrance through the normal channels. Juncker greeted Soros with hugs and kisses which was recorded on camera.

Juncker grants a meeting to Soros during the exact time this university is discussed. You are saying that is a coincidence?

Roderick Beck
Guest

You are taking what the Guardian wrote out of context. You may be able to convince 13 year olds, but not the educated.

Doggo
Guest

“You are taking what the Guardian wrote out of context. ”

And what did the Guardian write? They wrote “Soros University” do you think you are smarter than the Guardian writers? Because so far all you have to try to deny the existence of the Soros University is cheap insults.

Istvan
Guest

No doubt Soros provided Juncker with a gift of exquisite wine and Orban provided him with grief. Who would an old drunk preparing to retire rather meet with?

Doggo
Guest

best comment in the thread so far

Roderick Beck
Guest

Soros does not own or control any university. He founded one. You clown.

Ferenc
Guest

Wow, the Guardian writes “Soros University”!
And our Doggy had to comment that here immediately.
Well Doggy how many times is that used in the article: 1-TIME, for the rest they write it’s REAL name.
So why did they use it in the title? To just use OV’s wording, and with it make clear that this whole “higher education law”, isn’t about any education at all, but only targetted against one man, Soros, and his view of life.

So the Guardian used OV’s wording only ONCE (to make one thing very clear), and you are ONLY talking like OV’s little Doggy.

Ggrrr WOOF Ggrrrr!!

Guest
You’re right and this gives me the chance to go further OT re Hungarian dogs: When we walk our dog through the village (it’s a mix of Belgian shepard aka Malinois and German shepard, born here in the village, but went to school with me in Germany) there are two reactions by the village dogs. Some know us, say hello to our dog (i e they sniff each other wagging their tails) and then sit and wait for the dog treats that I’m always carrying on me. But a large number (maybe even the majority) go crazy when they see us – running along the fence and/or jumping up and down screaming their head off. So we’ve given them nicknames like körforgalom (the one who’s running in circles) or szívinfarktus or … And the behaviour of their masters is similar to that of the dogs, some are real country bumpkins – I won’t repeat what my wife calls them though. Our dog just walks on, usually ignoring them, only sometimes she turns round and barks at them shortly – then we move on … And at the next house maybe another friend is waiting, wagging its tail … My wife… Read more »
petofi
Guest

re: The Trumps

Ivanka was totally out of her depth in Europe. (She won’t be making that trip again anytime soon.)

Jared? I have no idea if he’s good at anything.

What gives these ‘kinder’ the idea that they’re suited for their positions of power?

Talk about hubris!

petofi
Guest

One could almost see papa Trumpo enterring the kid’s room–‘now, you play with these hundreds of figurines; and you, Jared, I’ll give you some brownies to fool around with…’

If it weren’t for their brooklyn accents, you’d think they were Hungarian!

Doggo
Guest

Your hatred of the Trumps is open and clear. You are not alone in this. There is a group of people who openly hate and treat the Trumps with contempt and yet they think will side with you in one issue or another.

Do you believe Trump will continue and continue to side with people who consider themselves his enemies? At some point Trump may get tired of siding with the enemy, don’t you think?

FreeWheeling
Guest

It’s been said that the people on the left fall in love with their leaders while those on the right just fall in line. Otherwise said, they are sheeple. In the first 100 days it is clear that Trump is a supreme flip-flopper on a huge list of issues. It doesn’t say much about your intelligence to support such a person with weak convictions. No wonder why his White House is so leaky with rumors to journalists and whispers within the Beltway that Gati is reporting about in his piece. Those high officials are obviously trying to shame Trump into being a coherent leader.

FreeWheeling
Guest

OT: Earlier this week the meltdown of the giant Croatian company Agrokor eventually caused the end of the current conservative Croat gov’t coalition because their finance minister was an exec at the financially mismanaged company. This company is huge in the Balkans, so one must wonder how this might affect Hungary and Fidesz?

webber
Guest
wrfree
Guest

Nice to know that some right near my neck of the woods are right on target with the goings on in the Truman administration especially with US ‘servants’ who have interests in other agendas.

Gorka as most know got minutes on Fox TV as a talking head big shot. Not sure what’s in store for him now as Fox is in a fix as a result of O’Reilly peccadillos and promulgating racial abuse. Will be interesting to see where he winds up on tv or in his political career. What can be sure is that he’ll make a meal of it.

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