Is this new far-right movement really new? No, it isn’t

The international media, which often ignores Hungarian domestic news, immediately perks up when a new far-right group appears on the scene. This is exactly what happened when the Army of Outlaws, a far-right movement led by Zsolt Tyirityán, and a lesser known radical university group called Identitesz, led by the young student Balázs László, gathered in Vecsés, a suburb of Budapest, to announce the formation of a new far-right, radical party they named Erő és Elszántság (Force and Determination). Both Reuters and the Associated Press published reports on the gathering of 200-300 people. According to Reuters, this new movement “looks to be more radical than any political organization targeting a serious political role since the fall of Communism, and uses openly racist language to oppose liberalism and immigration.” The AP report admits that this new formation “seems marginal for now, [though] efforts by the Jobbik party, Hungary’s largest far-right group, to attract more moderate voters could leave room for the growth of extremist groups like Force and Determination.”

Balázs László in Vecsés, July 8, 2017

I’m not sure why the Reuter’s reporter thinks that the ideas expressed by the leaders of this new group are substantially different from those espoused by other right-wing groups and parties. There is nothing new here except perhaps the more radical language with which these ideas are presented. The speakers said that the new party will fight liberalism. The prime minister of Hungary has been fighting liberalism for years and building an illiberal state. The organizers talked about defending white Europeans. The prime minister of Hungary gave long speeches about the defense of Europe as it existed before the migration from outside of the continent. True, he didn’t come right out and speak about “ethnic” or “race” defense, but that is what he meant. They said that they will fight “political correctness.” This is the same thing Viktor Orbán been saying for years about the straight-speaking Hungarians who shouldn’t fall into the destructive habit of political correctness. They talked about the danger of losing awareness of national and sexual identity. How often do we hear the same from Fidesz politicians, including the leader of the party, Viktor Orbán? But interestingly, the attention is on a group that managed to gather 200-300 people for “unfurling the flag of the far right” when the whole country is governed by a politician who espouses essentially the same ideas.

Moreover, there are signs that it is in fact Fidesz that is encouraging these fringe groups to organize themselves against Jobbik. At least it is somewhat suspicious that the government’s main media outlet, Magyar Idők, gave Balázs László of Identitesz the opportunity to acquaint the Hungarian public with his Nazi ideas. Balázs Gulyás, writing in Magyar Nemzet, rightly asked why a newspaper of any standing would publish a lengthy interview with such a person. Because there is no question that we are talking here about an echt Nazi. I saw an interview with him and can attest to the fact that he is a scary guy.

Identitesz is the Hungarian branch of the Identitarian movement, whose goal is “to make racism modern and fashionable.” Otherwise, the movement draws on all sorts of right-wing and conservative thinkers like Oswald Spengler, Carl Schmitt, and Aleksandr Dugin. Identitesz has close ties with the neo-Hungarist/Nazi Pax Hungarica Movement, a successor to Ferenc Szálasi’s Hungarist movement. In fact, László at one time was an active member of Pax Hungarica, to which no Jew, Gypsy, or non-Europid can even apply.

There have been far too many articles in Magyar Idők about these fringe organizations, starting with that lengthy interview with László. He no longer thinks in terms of “national radicalism” but of race defense for Europe as a whole. Just as Viktor Orbán no longer defends only Hungary from outside hordes but, thanks to the Hungarian government’s heroic efforts at closing the Balkan route of the asylum seekers, defends European culture and Christianity.

As for Zsolt Tyirityán’s speech at the Vecsés event, he talked at length about “the struggle for Lebensraum [élettér].” Commentators wondered whether Viktor Orbán will judge all this Nazi talk as severely as he did when a former Jobbik member of parliament used Jewish epithets against a Jewish entertainer. At that time he instructed Sándor Pintér, minister of the interior, to act with the full force of the law against him. So far, all the Nazi talk in Vecsés has been conveniently ignored.

As for the infamous term ‘Lebensraum’, it has been in circulation for years in Hungary. As László Karsai, the historian of the Holocaust, called to my attention today, Viktor Orbán used the term in January 2002 on Magyar Rádió’s notoriously right-wing program Vasárnapi Újság, which at that time he described as his favorite. When an opposition member inquired in parliament about the exact meaning of Lebensraum in this context, Orbán explained that “Lebensraum is that territory where Hungarians live.” Well, this is not different from the way Adolf Hitler used the term.

According to Balázs László, “ethnic defense” is a critical task that must be vigorously pursued. In his opinion, it is more important than matters of education and healthcare. One of the goals of the new movement, he said, is the spread of this truth in public discourse. Again, I don’t see anything revolutionary in this. This is exactly what’s been going on for at least two years in Hungary. Everything, with the possible exception of supporting sports, especially football, is of secondary importance to the defense of the country from those hordes from outside of Europe. Viktor Orbán has been systematically fueling Hungarians’ hatred against the refugees and found in George Soros the embodiment of everything that he is fighting against: humanity, charity, legality.

In brief, let’s not lose sight of the real danger that besets Hungary, Viktor Orbán and his government. Let’s not forget that Orbán’s Hungary is the only country in the European Union where a far-right government is in power which has by now more or less introduced a one-party system, which normally has a very long lifespan.

July 16, 2017
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Ferenc
Guest

I find the use of words, which take the humane away from humans, always very appalling. In relation to refugees and asylum seekers, one of such words is “hordes”, even used here in the blogpost.
I think it’s not used by Eva as her own word, but as a quote used (too) many times by anti-migrationists. If I’m correct and to avoid any misunderstandings, it’s highly recommended to put all from others sourced words between “quotes”.

The post itself is spot on! Thanks!
News prefers to put emphasis on extremes, and therefore OV&Co should get much more international media coverage, as the current Hungarian government is a (worldwide small) extreme itself.

exTor
Guest

It is not always easy to tell, but Éva mostly puts her paragraphs in the mindsets of the topic individuals. She used ‘hordes’ twice, paragraphs 5 and 8. In paragraph 5, Éva links ‘hordes’ to Viktor Orbán, whom she then links to the new scumbag-on-the-block Balázs László. In paragraph 8, Éva is primarily saying that Viktor Orbán has been doing nothing but stoking Magyar fear of the ‘hordes’, which is Orbán’s mindset terminology.

Regular readers of Hungarian Spectrum are familiar with Éva’s writing style. Newcomers to this forum might not pick up on the difference. Those for whom English is somewhat less good probably wont catch the subtlety.

I only use quotation marks for actual quotations. I use what I call signify marks variously, eg: to occasionally highlight titles, sometimes to nuance words, as when I want to indicate irony, sarcasm, etcetera. Here I have used signify marks to highlight/set out [kiemelni] the word ‘hordes’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

petofi
Guest

“Those for whom English is less good…”–pardon me?

Is this one of those ‘uber-intellectual’ phrases of yours…?

exTor
Guest

You crack me up, petőfi. I usually get a few yucks from your output. I guess you want me to say that my wording was my bad –to employ a neostylism– however my ‘überintellectualism’, as you characterized it, was a way to not denigrate. It’s better to say –wouldn’t you say?– that someone’s English is ‘less good’ than it is to say that someone’s English is ‘bad’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Guest

Every country has a “Bodensatz” of people who respond to this kind of extreme right wing (or fascist) propaganda, in developed places it’s maybe max 10% – but in backward places like the former “Communist” states (including East Germany) it may be as high as 30%..

Fear of the unknown is typical for them

Only continuing education and information will help reduce that amount of loonies!

PS:
The percentage seems to be highest in soccer fans – I wonder why …

PPS and rather OT but interesting and moving:
An article on one of those “coal counties” that would maybe profit if Trump could really “return coal mines” to the USA (which he can’t of course) and the effects of their Walmart superstore (of which the people were so proud …) closing:
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/09/what-happened-when-walmart-left
Hit hard by the longterm decline in coal mining that is the mainstay of the area, McDowell County has seen a devastating and sustained erosion of its people, from almost 100,000 in 1950 when coal was king, to about 18,000 today.
The situation is of course similar in some parts of Eastern Hungary and Eastern Germany – but not as bad yet …

Member

I have little faith in education and information. Let’s ignore the fact that Hungary’s education system was designed by Rozsa Hoffman, is run by Zoltan Balog, and its universities are commonly abused as diploma mills. Let’s pretend Hungary has a quality education system. The kids will still come home from school, talk about what they learned today, and their parents/grandparents will respond, “Yes, that’s what the Rothschild family wants you to think. But I am going to tell you the REAL STORY.”

Guest

Alex, don’t be too pessimistic!

I remember my youth as a pupil in Germany in the 50s and as a student in the 60s – and most of our teachers were what we called (behind their back of course …) Clerical Fascists – but we read books with which they would not have agreed and moved on!
Do you think that Hungarian young people can’t do that?
When I look at my wife’s children and their friends (who are in their 30s and 40s now) I’m optimistic.
And the generation coming after that will move on too …

PS and rather OT:

I still remember vividly one of the discussion we had outside school (actually in a bar) with a teacher and a Catholic priest who told us about burning a witch:
Well, her body was destroyed – but her soul was saved!
We pupils (around 16 or 17 years old) just looked at each other …
Funnily enough a few days ago I mentioned this to my friend who was there too and he said:
Of course I remember that, even still know the name of the guy: Father Gabriel!
So again, Hungary is 50 or 60 years behind the developed West.

Observer
Guest

Surely family is one of the major determinants, but studies prove that the education/intelligence/liberalism (classical – free thought, not leftist) mix of a country helps with its rule of law/development/prosperity.

And vise versa, e.g. Hungary where the danger of a vicious circle downward looms large.

petofi
Guest

One should never worry about Orban’s political future. If worse comes to worst, Orban will offer a free afternoon (3pm sharp, Sunday) at the Puskas stadium:
“The jews will be discoursing with the lions on the merits of the Talmud.” (please don’t feed the lions).

bimbi
Guest

A chilling summary of the not-so-new far right ideologies expressed in Vecsés, especially when we are also reminded to what a great extent these ideas are also broadcast by Orbán and his illiberal government. The drumbeat of fear associated with the government’s campaign has increased in recent time. Hungary is not a happy land – except for the neo-Nazis gathering in Vecsés and the Fidesz pigs clustering round the overflowing corruption trough. Miserable.

By contrast these words are at the start of an article from today’s Guardian on President Macron speaking of the French nation’s role in the Holocaust – https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/17/france-macron-denounces-state-role-holocaust-atrocity-paris-1942

“The French president, Emmanuel Macron, has denounced France’s collaboration in the Holocaust, lashing out at those who negate or minimise the country’s role in sending tens of thousands of Jews to their deaths.”

Orbán – not to speak of Áder and the featherweight Schmitt – could, with full justification, have said the same – and more – of Hungary but none of them had the moral stature and honesty to do so.
Our Fidesz government wears the mantle of disgrace.

Guest

Well, Macron is obviously one of those horrible dreaded Liberals.
I also found this speech moving – though of course it doesn’t take the responsibility away from Germany. But there were “Quislings” everywhere – from France to Hungary, Switzerland to Denmark etc …
Ader, Schmitt etc are nothings imho, hollow figureheads, empty shells.

Ivan
Guest

Denmark, Wolfi?!

Guest

Of course Quisling was a Norwegian – you’re right!

But in every European country (including Denmark and Hungary, you know?) there were “Helfershelfer” for the Nazis.
Btw I’m still looking for a good translation of Helfershelfer into English – got something?

Ivan
Guest

Thanks for correcting. As you probably know, Denmark had an exemplary record in protecting her Jewish citizens from the Nazis.

Guest

Yes, and there’s a famous story involving Niels Bohr and the Hungarian Jewish scientist de Hevesy who worked in Copenhagen (and later also got the Nobel Prize):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_de_Hevesy
When Nazi Germany occupied Denmark from April 1940, during World War II, de Hevesy dissolved the gold Nobel Prizes of Max von Laue and James Franck with aqua regia; it was illegal at the time to send gold out of the country, and had it been discovered that Laue and Franck had done so to prevent them from being stolen, they could have faced prosecution in Germany. He placed the resulting solution on a shelf in his laboratory at the Niels Bohr Institute. After the war, he returned to find the solution undisturbed and precipitated the gold out of the acid. The Nobel Society then recast the Nobel Prizes using the original gold.
That’s what I call humanity!

Observer
Guest

Mention the Bulgarians too – they neither shipped nor killed, nor even severy persecuted their Jewish citizens

Ferenc
Guest

Thanks for the article!
Macron quote from the above Guardian article:
“It is convenient to see the Vichy regime as born of nothingness, returned to nothingness . Yes, it’s convenient, but it is false. We cannot build pride upon a lie.”

Hungarians, agreeing with the above and understanding all the lies the HU government has been spraying over them, must feel terrible and deprived of all their pride…
For the ones believing in the sprayed lies, I haven’t got a clue how they can live with those and what will happen when they’ll have to acknowledge (almost) all were lies…

petofi
Guest

“…believing in the sprayed lies…”–a fine phrase.

Let me enlarge upon it: if only the people could see Orban, like the skunk that he is, spraying one and all
with his all-embracing foulness…

wrfree
Guest
It is incredible and stunning to see how the intellectual and political currents now simmering and being bandied about in Magyarorszag bring on a sort of woeful time travel back to the 30’s. The despicable spectre of that time is once again finding a home in VO’s land. And yet I believe most go about their lives apparently oblivious to what is occurring around them not knowing that the floor they stand on is slowly being eroded under them. And I’d suggest that what is additionally chilling about the ‘new’ far-right’ party besides its political line is its title….Force and Determination’. It suggests a pure physical manifestation of force to be acted upon when expressing its views. As usual with these kinds of parties it’s all upfront with an ‘in your face’ attitude. And you better get the point buddy. At this time they don’t seem to have unique ,coordinated and colored uniforms. Wouldn’t be surprised in the least if fittings will be set up soon. At one time those in the early 20th who took power intuitively knew that ‘clothes made the man’. Certainly this is not encouraging after seeing migrants and demonstrators beaten as they show disagreement with… Read more »
Guest

This reminds me of a saying in German:
Ich kann nichts, ich bin nichts, gebt mir eine Uniform
I can do nothing, I am nothing, give me a uniform!

Originally this was meant as a critical remark at police and people working for the railways and the post office – if you use it against a policeman however this counts as libel/slander and might get you into jail, or at least you’d have to pay a fine …

aida
Guest

It is stupid and unfair verse. The heavy agricultural workforce resented the police who had very light duty work by comparison. Nevertheless
The various paramilitary formations in Hungary would be breaking the law in most of Europe by parading in uniform.
I remember that a few years ago public meetings were held under red and white striped banners which too were against the law. Has the movement gone away now Fidesz run the show?

Gretchen
Guest

You are thinking of the Árpád flag. I have seen it flown at Batthyányi tér and at Bécsi kapu in the past few years. It is a very beautiful flag and I don’t remember which group/s have adopted it. Some sort of neo-Nazi?

Gretchen
Guest

Here’s a link to the neo-Nazi connection to the Árpád flag: http://www.jta.org/2006/10/31/life-religion/features/nazi-linked-flag-surfaces-in-hungary

aida
Guest

In the absence of more recent material the Nazi flag has seen better days. Presumably it’s use then has served its purpose.
Beautiful flag? They were used in battle to identify your side. They used to troop it to make sure the mercenary rabble recognised their own.

exTor
Guest

comment image

http://www.jta.org/2006/10/31/life-religion/features/nazi-linked-flag-surfaces-in-hungary

Good article, Gretchen. Still relevant a decade later, with Sebestyen Gorka (now esconced in the White House) going soft on the Árpád flag wavers by saying, in effect, that they [the flag wavers] cannot prove [of themselves] that they’re not racists, notwithstanding the Árpád flags. Flipping Gorka, then the executive director of a conservative thinktank in Budapest, his comment becomes “You cant prove that the Árpád flag wavers are racists.”

MAGYARKOZÓ

aida
Guest

Thanks for this.

Not everyone in Hungary or in UK is racist. But in both countries there is an underlying acceptance, indeed promotion of racism.
If these two countries took the issue seriously wevwoukd see a serious movement to counter it. In neither country is there any such thing. In both the opposite is the truth.

Make no mistake: Hungary and the UK are both profoundly racist countries. It is our task to confront them.

Ivan
Guest

aida, I believe UK and Hungary are at or near opposite ends of the European spectrum as regards racism. Perhaps Tappanch would be good enough to supply stats.

Ferenc
Guest

“Gorka, then the executive director of a conservative thinktank in Budapest”
That thinktank was nothing more than he and his wife brainstorming in their cellar,
seems now he has to do it on his own in a basement room under a light coloured building…

dos929
Guest

The Orban regime cannot distance itself from paving the path for Hungary shifting to the extreme right. If this will continue all those that find this regime unpalatable will leave for the West and leave the regime to rule over those 5-6 million who for one reason or other could not save themselves from this unspeakable tyranny…

wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘Ich kann nichts, ich bin nichts, gebt mir eine uniform’

How possibly appropriate to the times.

I have a book..’Sieg Heil… ‘An Illustrated History of Germany from Bismarck to Hitler’ put together as a caution for future generations by Stefan Lorant who was imprisoned by Hitler. And astoundingly as we look upon events in Magyarorszag today ( a society stridently focusing on what Lorant noted was ‘Recht und Gesetz’ and the erosion of civil liberties) was freed through the Magyar government’s intercession.

The book itself is an indictment of the madness which enveloped Germany , Europe and eventually the world in ruthless all out total war. It powerfully puts perspective on aspects where the common thought is such that ‘it can’t happen here’ or ‘again’ for that matter. This ‘picture book’ of sad, horrific and soul-crushing images of utter disaster arguably hovers over the Magyar ‘character’. Lately it can be suggested that more and more the latter is developing into what was an ominous Prussian one in the entirety of Magyar political dialogue and debate.

petofi
Guest

Don’t be silly, Bimbi, Orban’s anti-semitism is a political ploy.
To gainsay it is to lose the rich harvest it has brought to the party-

exTor
Guest

comment image

I dont know why Éva is surprised/dismayed that the “international media … perk[ed] up when … [Force and Determination] appear[ed] on the scene”. FAD is videogenic: it has youth, sharp images, tough language. This Éva acknowledges and this is newsworthy. As she rightly points out, FAD’s rightwingism isn’t new, its delineation of its rightwingism is sharper: out-and-out racist, not mealymouth [lukewarm] racist à la Orbán.

It is telling that this gathering, while not actually held in Budapest, took place in Vecsés, which is on the southeast border of the city. Instead of somewhere in the boonies, it was butted up against Budapest, probably to maximize attendance and publicity.

As was pointed out, the Fidesz connection [eg: Magyar Idők interview] is revealing. It wouldn’t surprise me to learn that Fidesz actually paid for this gathering of like nominds. The question is “Cui bono?”, not so much “Who benefits?”, but how does Fidesz benefit by helping FAD?, further out than Jobbik, now moving politically inward. Sure, some disaffected Jobbik racists are likely to jump ship, however a Fidesz FAD maneuver would only work if FAD becomes a political party that can siphon 2018 Jobbik votes.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Member

These people on the picture are mentally disordered and unfortunately dangerous.

They must have a huge minority complex and a lack of self confidence, that makes them feel strong only in their hordes.

Guest

Winston, you probably meant to write “inferiority complex” …

And that gives me the chance to retell an old joke:
One of these right wingers goes to a psychiatrist and asks for help because of his inferiority complex.
After several therapy sessions the psychiatrist says:

Sorry, I can’t help you – you don’t have an inferiority complex, you just are inferior …

Jean P.
Guest

“…Vecsés, a suburb of Budapest…”
Vecsés is not just a suburb of Budapest. It is a very special suburb. Founded by Schwabs (a German tribe) and still having a sizeable cabbage growing German minority it is the sauerkraut capital of Hungary. Vecsés was probably not chosen for the neo-nazi event by a dart arrow on the map of Hungary.

exTor
Guest

Interesting thought, Jean P. I know that east of where I live [Csepel] there are many Swabians [svábok] in Budapest Districts XX and XXIII, which are on the east side of the Soroksári Duna, the channel that makes Csepel an island. I doubt, however, that the fascist FAD boys tried to get a permit from Budapest to hold their gathering in South Budapest somewhere.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Member

In Germany a Schwabe is someone from Schwabenland (Wolfis’ home).
I read that in Hungary a Schwab was anyone, who settled in Hungary, i.e. not only Germans.

Vecses: There was recently (few month ago) kind of protest in the local Jobbik group, because they were not satisfied with the course of the party anymore. I don’t remember which event had triggered it.

Ferenc
Guest

I vaguely remember more relations between Vecsés and far-right movements, but to insinuate that that might have something to do with the German roots of place is too easy for me, convincing proof really needed.
Checked the local politics of Vecsés:
*mayor since 1990 continuous Fidesz&KDNP;
*current local council: 8x Fidesz&Co (all direct with 60-80%) – 2x MSZP&Co – 1x Jobbik

aida
Guest

Just before we make our judgment it might be interesting to note the case of 16 year old beautiful Polish girl who killed herself in her school toilet cubicle in Truro, Cornwall. England United Kingdom. She had been called by her schoolmates a stupid Pole and told to go back to her country.

Her tragic end is a Brexit spin off. Please remember that Hungarian xenophobia may claim victims in unacceptable numbers. In my experience it is small fry these days when you compare it to the venom thrown at the not English by the English.

Read today’s Daily Telegraph why French are envious of Brexit. The headline answer seems to be the French have no history. Haha.

wrfree
Guest

Re: the ‘stupid Pole’ incident at Truro Cornwall

About 10 years ago my wife and I traveled to Cornwall. We cannot deny it is a beautiful and picturesque land. An extraordinary place in Brit history. It is where legends lie. On the other hand we got an impression while speaking to locals that Cornwall was a refuge of those fleeing parts of Britain because of the ‘others’. It was off in the ‘west country’off the beaten path and relatively remote.

Years on I’m afraid the chickens are coming home to roost. By the way because of my heavy NYC accent they called me in jest as sounding like a ‘hood’. Ironic comment in a way as someone dies years on for simply being persecuted for who she is.

wpDiscuz