What happened to Momentum? The loss of youthful innocence

I think it’s time to return to Momentum, a new political formation that became an overnight sensation after their activists, with some help from left-liberal parties, collected 260,000 signatures in the dead of winter in support of a referendum about holding the Olympic Games in Budapest in 2024. The overwhelming support for the initiative forced the Orbán government to retreat and abandon one of Viktor Orbán’s most cherished dreams.

The last time I wrote about Momentum was in March, after a number of disastrous interviews that András Fekete-Győr, the leader of the group, gave to ATV and HírTV. I titled that post “What’s behind Momentum? Banal clichés.” I’m afraid nothing has happened since to make me change my mind. But, if we can believe Republikon Intézet’s telephone poll, Momentum is so popular in Budapest that 9% of active voters would vote for it at the next election. Momentum’s standing nationwide, as measured by several polling companies, is 2%.

Many commentators compare Momentum to the youthful Fidesz in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It was also a generational party that came from practically nowhere. A few months later it won enough votes to be represented in parliament. In July 1989 Fidesz organized a three-four-day gathering that included political discussions. It was held in Bálványosfűrdő/Băile Bálványos, which over the years has become a gathering place for Hungarians, mostly from Romania, to listen to the political messages of Viktor Orbán. Perhaps it is not a coincidence that the leadership of Momentum decided to organize a three-day gathering called “Opening Festival” in Bodajk, a town of 4,000 inhabitants in Fejér County. During the day they held panel discussions and at night it was all fun and games. Lots of music and dancing. The event, as we learned later, cost quite a bit of money, but the business-minded Momentum leadership believed that it was a good investment, even in financial terms. By all accounts relatively few people attended. According to the journalist from Index, on the first day there were no more than 200-300 people.

In March, when I looked at Momentum’s so-called program, it was practically nonexistent. Unfortunately, the situation hasn’t changed since. They promise a party program for October 15. Otherwise, Momentum’s strongest message is that it rejects not only the last seven years of Fidesz rule but everything that has happened in Hungary since 1989. As for the general political orientation of the party, Fekete-Győr likened Momentum to Emmanuel Macron’s “En Marche!” The general impression is that Momentum is neither on the right nor on the left, perhaps because so far it seems devoid of ideas.

It is almost impossible to figure out what Momentum actually wants. They made only a few concrete political announcements, the most important of which was that in no way would they consider cooperation with any other party unless “there is a danger of a two-thirds Fidesz majority,” as Fekete-Győr put it. This makes no sense to me. By the time it seems likely that Fidesz’s strength would result in a two-thirds majority, no cooperation among opposition parties could do anything to change the situation.

Momentum seems not to know whether it is a serious political party or a charitable organization. In the midst of talking about matters like Hungary’s place in the European Union and the benefits of the Eurozone, Fekete-Győr could tell his audience about a project of theirs to supply soap and towels to schools and hospitals where they are currently in short supply.

Árpád W. Tóta of HVG, whom I consider one of the most astute observers of the current Hungarian political scene, asked the leaders of Momentum some probing questions. What Tóta learned from Fekete-Győr was that the political profile of Momentum, which today is fuzzy, will be shaped by whatever the people want. Of course, this is a very dangerous populist notion which can lead a party to adopt even extremist views. This is exactly what happened in Fidesz’s case when Viktor Orbán discovered what people wanted to hear. I don’t think the leaders of Momentum ever thought through the dangers of such a populist approach to politics. I’m sorry that the video has no subtitles, but those who understand the language should definitely spend 10 minutes on Tóta’s conversations with the leaders of Momentum. It is worth it.

The “Opening Festival” was lavish, and questions were raised where the money came from to fund the event. Tóta himself in that interview asked Fekete-Győr about the cost, but the Momentum leader feigned ignorance of the amount. He maintained, however, that the only money they have comes from membership dues. Another student leader, Miklós Hajnal, on ATV claimed that the cost of the festival was a “trade secret.” Eventually Momentum announced the real cost. The party spent 23 million forints (about $89,000); the income received from the participants was only 11 million. Apparently, currently Momentum has 1,100 card-carrying party members who pay 1,000 forints a month as a membership fee.

The less than transparent finances of Momentum have aroused the interest of the media. A few days ago Heti Válasz, a right-of-center weekly, discovered that at least two well-known businessmen have helped the party financially. One is Gábor Bojár of Graphisoft, a software company, and the founder of the Aquincum Institute of Technology, who told the paper that he gave them one million forints. The other is György Raskó, MDF’s undersecretary of agriculture in the Antall government, who is now a successful agro businessman. The amount Raskó gave to Momentum is unknown, but there were strings attached to the gift. He wanted the party to include an education program that would be similar to the successful Finnish model. Apparently, he also wanted to receive assurances that Momentum would not cooperate on any level with MSZP and the Demokratikus Koalíció. In addition, Raskó also warned that he doesn’t want Momentum to become a “Budapest downtown liberal intellectual” party.

Momentum, right turn / Photo: HVG

Not surprisingly the government media attacked both Momentum and its wealthy supporters. Magyar Idők hypocritically expressed its concern over “the undue influence of entrepreneurs over party politics” and declared that Momentum is not an independent party but an instrument in the hands of men with definite political goals. But left-liberal publications aren’t exactly thrilled either. Pesti Bulvár, a relatively new internet news site, repeated the general dissatisfaction on the left with Momentum’s refusal to cooperate with anyone, which further weakens the anti-Orbán forces. Garai, the author of the article, titled “A party is for sale,” estimates that Momentum has already spent 100-150 million forints. He charges that the leaders of Momentum, by accepting Raskó’s demands, admitted that they don’t really want regime change because they ought to know that small parties running alone can lead only to Fidesz victory. Moreover, given Raskó’s political views, he says, Momentum is moving over to the right.

I have had heard interviews with both Bojár and Raskó and found most of what they had to say eminently reasonable. Raskó is normally asked to comment on matters related to agriculture, and he shows great knowledge of the subject. However, I must admit that his categorical refusal to make common cause with other anti-Orbán forces shows a shortsighted and rigidly ideological posture that is not in the interest of the country.

We don’t know how long Raskó has been supporting Momentum financially, but my feeling is that it has been from the very beginning. We know that he gave these young people money at the time of their signature drive for a referendum on the Olympic Games. Moreover, Raskó’s son is a member of Momentum. As for the extent to which Raskó has been influencing these young people’s ideas, that remains an open question. We know, for example, that Raskó is a believer in the establishment of large agro businesses instead of small family farms and that Momentum also supports this idea.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with getting advice from experts. In the case of Momentum, when I think back, I was struck how often András Fekete-Győr boasted about unnamed, very important advisers who worked with them. All political parties need experts in a range of fields, but in this case we have a bunch of young people without any political experience who may not know what to do with the advice they receive. And, of course, I am disheartened by Raskó’s advice of noncooperation. It is the worst advice he could have given the leaders of Momentum.

Finally, Edina Pottyondy, a member of Momentum’s board of governors, quit her post two days ago. She remains a member of the party and will be one of the organizers of the party’s efforts to recruit followers in the countryside, said the spokesman for the party. I cannot escape the feeling that the less than transparent handling of the party’s finances might have had something to do with her departure. In any case, whatever has transpired since July 22, the first day of the “Opening Festival,” has done a lot of damage to Momentum. The reputation of the seemingly innocent, young, bright boys and girls has suffered a serious blow.

August 5, 2017
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Observer
Guest

Momentum (hard work noteithstsnding) rode the wave of public rejection of the Olympics in Budapest. Single issue organization where the leaders want to keep the party going, but that party’s over.
So is Momentum, I bet.

The estimated 100+ mil Ft spent (if anywhere near) begs the Q Where from? as there are no 100 Boyars or Raskos.

Member

“Fekete-Győr likened Momentum to Emmanuel Macron’s “En Marche!””

Macron’s main goal is to scrap the workers’ protection in the French “Code du travail”, therefore Momentum has nothing to do – Orban already gutted the Hungarian “munka törvénykönyve” in 2012.

As for Macron:
“Already the Parliament, controlled by representatives of his own political movement, has voted to let the president pass the reforms by ordinance, a shortcut past parliamentary debate and amendment. Once the details are worked out — and assuming France’s administrative high court signs off — the reforms become law.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/04/world/europe/emmanuel-macron-france-economy-labor-law.html

“A shortcut past parliamentary debate and amendment” is a restriction on democracy, widely practiced by Orban too.

I also observed, in location, that this significant change (rule by decree) was hushed up by the French mainstream television media a few days ago.

petofi
Guest

Is it possible that the French labour leaders have gone too far?
Don’t they already have a 35-hr. work week?

tappanch
Guest

Dear Петровић,

I admit I have not read this 3040-page long beauty, evolving in the last 110 years.

http://www.cjoint.com/doc/17_01/GAgjb4MqliM_codedutravail2017.pdf

35-hour working week: There are more and more things done by machines, so it is not a bad idea to reduce the working hours and hire more people.

The French educational system might be a cause of the high unemployment rate in France and not the 35-hour week, I am not sure.

food for thought:
labor participation rate vs unemployment rate
France: 71.4% vs 9.6%
Germany: 61.3% vs 3.8%

US: 62.9% vs 4.3%
Hungary: 61.8% vs 4.3% (But we know the numerous tricks the Orban gov’t deploys)

https://tradingeconomics.com/france/labor-force-participation-rate
https://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS11300000

Aida
Guest

France is an interesting case. Forget the 35 hour week. It is a total nonsense introduced by Jospin of 1968. It results amongst other things in increased labour cost. It also produces inflexibility.

The French work force is very productive. However, the French do not uniformly go for the US/English model of economics. They have more emphasis on solidarity which simply means mutual help. Cartels are everywhere. I pay €18.80 for my favourite sausage in the local market, in the Casion suoermaket and in the small grocer round the corner. The price of the main courses along a long street of restaurants does not fall below €23.

I am intrigued to see what Macron comes up with. France is a beautiful and sometimes deeply irritating country. It will not be improved by instability generated by doctrinaire adherence to a half baked English, Thatcherite set of reforms.

Member

In a small French town, you can get a decent and copious lunch in a restaurant for 10 euros.

my estimate:
France/Hungary food prices: 1.5
France/Hungary net salaries: 3.5

other prices:
https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/country_result.jsp?country=France

Aida
Guest

10€ or 23€ the system is the same. But in bigger places the 10€ deal is more difficult to find.

exTor
Guest

Copious lunch? Interesting phraseology, tappanch. I have only used ‘copious’ with plural nouns, eg: ‘taking copious notes’. I might have said ‘bountiful lunch’ or more probably ‘humongous lunch’ or maybe just plainly ‘huge lunch’.

Your fact profferings are oftentimes too difficult to decipher without your input, which is too often left out, however this time I may have gotten the drift. Accordingly, a 10-euro lunch, roughly 3000 forints, can be had in Hungary for about 2000 forints.

The cost is doable, however I’m not sure whether a native of Magyarland would balk at paying that kind of money regardless of the food quantity.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Aida
Guest

Copious is a good word, but I would prefer it if I can describe it as tasty. What can you get for 2000 forints? In a restaurant? A bowl of soup?

Member

The word & practice of “bureaucratie” was invented in the 18th century France. This tradition is strong.

Member

2017-08-03: “Après l’Assemblée nationale ce mardi, le Sénat a voté ce mercredi le texte qui autorise le gouvernement à passer par les ordonnances pour réformer le code du travail. ”

https://www.francebleu.fr/infos/politique/le-parlement-autorise-la-reforme-du-code-du-travail-par-ordonnances-1501748779

Member

Fekete-Győr in February 2017:

“I remember that SzDSz was a swear word in my family, almost everybody was a hard-core Fidesz supporter.” Andras F-Gy says he voted for Fidesz in 2010.

http://index.hu/belfold/2017/02/23/momentum_mozgalom_fekete-gyor_andras_olimpia_nepszavazas/

Member
Guest

Again this (like the story of LMP) reminds me of our German Green Party which had similar ideas atfirst of “going it alone” but when they got into parliament they quickly realised that only cooperation works.
Should we hope that Momentum will behave/develop in a similar way?
Generally however I’m really disappointed with the Hungarian opposition – so many “splinter groups” behaving erratically with egocentric leaders!
Reminds me of my student days fifty years ago wher we also had political splinter groups whichappeared from nowhere but also disappeared very quickly again …
So again Hungary is fifty years behind!

Guest
“Momentum’s refusal to cooperate with anyone”/ Having taught in Hungarian schools, “Momentum’s refusal to cooperate with anyone”, albeit very disheartening, comes as no surprise. Hungarian children learn at a young age to be competitive in the classroom, where learning is not about how to develop and exercise a creative mind, but about who is top dog. While competition is not a bad thing in itself, it is only of benefit when tempered with an ability to cooperate. Post 1989 and the iron curtain, this inability to cooperate and work together for the good of the whole was most evident when multinational companies extended their businesses into Hungary and managers had to be “imported” from the West since Hungarian company bosses, however clever and willing and hard-working they are, had no clue how to lead or organize their businesses efficiently. Momentum’s Glastonbury-style event and the interviews with the attendees indicates a complete lack of knowledge of how the larger world operates, and will do nothing to defeat Orbán and the most corrupt regime within the EU. So far, the only party leader with experience and understanding of how democracies work, and how to implement such a system, is Gyurcsány. The smear… Read more »
Member

I still mourn after Gordon Bajnai.
I think he was a competent politician, who did well during the economic crisis, and most of all, I appreciated the absence of hate, lies, hunger of power and such.
Someone like him would be good to unite the people (left and right) again and put an end to the hate between Hungarians.

What my opinion about Momentum concerns:
So far I was in a waiting mode. Their lack of a clear overarching concept, I thought, maybe they are only careful. Maybe they take their time to eventually attract as many people as possible and not get burnt quickly.

They themselfs set the date to make public their party program by Oktober 15. We will see then.

Anyway, after reading Evas’ post, my hope, that something good is coming out of Momentum got less again. Before I wasn’t a great fan of them either. Nevertheless after the Nolympia action, I thought they might have kind of an organizational talent to implement their plan (unlike some other parties).

Guest

Winston
I agree with you- Bajmai was not only a good statesman, but a real gentleman.

A coalition of Bajnai-Gyurcsány would have been brilliant except for the hate-filled anti-Gyurcsány brigade, as I mentioned before.

petofi
Guest

Bajnai killed geese without eating them: nothing worse than that…

Istvan
Guest
Eva really did a great update on Momentum. Sociologically speaking I believe it’s a social group based on University educated younger Hungarians who deeply want to emulate entrepreneurs like Bill Gates, or Steve Jobs whom Gábor Bojár of Graphisoft built a statue of in front of his office, or even someone like the dashing and arrogant Richard Branson, founder, Virgin Group. The primary problem I see here is the space for entrepreneurs within the Hungarian economy that in highly dependent on the core industrial nations of the EU and to a growing extent on the Russian oligarchy is very limited. Momentum I think is more wishful thinking than reality. But I do think this sociological subgroup is deeply frustrated within Budapest and for good reason. The Orban/Fidesz Mafia state is highly irrational and containing of entrepreneurial efforts due to the inherent corruption of the process and kickbacks of one type or another that must be provided. The problem is the best and brightest Hungarians get acquired by multinational corporations and their ideas are also bought up, this is the case whether they emigrate or stay in Budapest. One lesson that Bill Gates learned is not to allow rival entrepreneurs to… Read more »
wrfree
Guest

You know I’d suggest if Momentum heeds the ‘best and brightest’ yet it is supposedly ‘devoid of ideas’ where is the upshot? Gates, Jobs, Bezos had an idea and ran with it. The environment they worked in namely the business, financial , technical and strategic was fertile and the stars were aligned toward success.

Momentum’s first order is one is to construct a grounded identity. How can a party know where it wants to go if it doesn’t know what or who it is? And that is a situation open to being co-opted and possibly fulfilling other strategies outside itself.

exTor
Guest

comment image

There are signs that another rightist party will emerge from Momentum, which is a group that coalesced around a bunch of petitbourgeois students ex of a basically populist movement: shitcanning Budapest’s Olympic bid.

Two major figures already involved with Momentum are businessmen: Gábor Bojár, owner of a software startup, and Györgyi Raskó, in agribiz. Raskó proffered his rightist ‘advice’ that Momentum not become another downtown-Budapest liberal-intellectual party.

(Historically, a boyar was a high-level aristocrat in Slavic countries.)

Leading from the rear [populism], as suggested by András Fekete-Győr, is a recipe for reactionariness, as Éva points out. The only way that Momentum can help Hungary is by allying with the working class. It must attract workers from MSZP with a program that champions working-class interests. Building up the working class will build Hungary.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Istvan
Guest
Being myself a moderate American conservative I have some intellectual problems accepting the Hungarian working class as a critical factor in contemporary Hungary, or for that matter anywhere else. I think the Marxist Hungarian philosopher György Lukács theorized this in terms of class consciousness and the socially situated workers do not constitute a “class” unless they are aware of themselves within the social structure of a capitalist society. I don’t see working class people in Hungary composing anything like a unified social class, in a very real way they are similar to crowd for Trump the other day at Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington, West Virginia ( see https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/aug/05/donald-trump-rallies-supporters-west-virginia ). I would add as a non-Marxist I question the labor theory of value upon which the theoretical power of the working class is based. I am aware that a variation of that idea was to be found even in the writings of Adam Smith. I believe market, and exchange values can be created completely without human labor and that value is market based on entitled ownership defined in law, with laws enforced by the military power of nation states along with treaties designed to avoid turning trade wars into… Read more »
exTor
Guest
What does your conservativism have to do with your intellectual concerns, István? Or viceversa? You stated that you dont see the “working class as a critical factor” either in Hungary “or for that matter anywhere else”, which would be a suitable topic for a book, not for a Hungarian Spectrum thread. All workers have rudimentary class consciousnesses, notwithstanding their political orientations, which (in some cases) may line up full-square with their bosses. Most workers understand that their own interests [eg: higher wages, better conditions, etcetera] do not dovetail with the interests [eg: greater profits] of their bosses. My point about Momentum is that it must intersect the working class by addressing the concerns of workers about issues such as jobs and wages. The validity of Marx’s labor theory of value is ultimately irrelevant for me, siding with workers no matter how lumpen-reactionary they may be. That said, it may be time to split the workers from its representer: MSZP As Tappanch intimated, centrist Emmanuel Macron likely will in the long run operate against French working-class interests. Momentum must work with the Hungarian working class, splitting it from Jobbik and Fidesz. If Momentum cannot incorporate the Hungarian working class into its… Read more »
Istvan
Guest
I honestly do not see those working class people in West Virginia attending the Trump rally as having any concept of themselves as a social class that is separate from the social grouping Trump resides in, call it the elite or bourgeoisie if one chooses. It is all mushy in their heads, they just see Trump like themselves on social policy even though he is more wealthy. They completely identify with Trump and some are amazingly coal miners. I haven’t seen it in Hungary either since transition. People in my extended family see themselves in relationship to power connections, a relative who is a manager or business owner, a relative who has connections with Fidesz, or the Catholic hierarchy in my families case. Many people that can be called working class in the USA consider themselves to be middle class, see http://www.gallup.com/poll/199727/americans-identification-middle-class-edges-back.aspx That is pretty hard to call working class consciousness of any type. Trump has used the phrase workers, but more often like most politicians it’s mixed together with middle class references. More and more on a global scale people identify themselves in relationship to the income distribution situation of their country rather than their relationship to productive property… Read more »
exTor
Guest
I’ve located this thread leftward to give you the skinny, István. West Virginia coalminers are definitely part of the working class, irrespective of how they see themselves, irrespective of whether they identify with Donald Trump. You confuse social identification with bourgeois reality. Trump is the boss/owner and the doorman in Trump Tower is a worker no matter how each sees the other. Donald Trump is part of the capitalist class, a coalminer earning a wage is part of the working class. There can be no other reality. Capitalism has not changed fundamentally since Marx wrote about it and the term ‘working class’ is no less useful now than in the mid19th century. As for worker selfidentification, it can be said that a worker is ‘middle class’, which I denote to be a working-class stratum. That link you gave was interesting: supposedly 58% of 2016 Americans selfidentify as ‘middle class’. Reality might decide otherwise. Remember, this is selfidentification. There is no doubt that Trump was able to get the white working-class vote that normally went to the Democrats. He did it by overselling his abilities (as a savvy businessman) and by using basic language that repeated his major talking points. That’s… Read more »
Jon Van Til
Guest

In a parliamentary system, which Hungary was once upon a time but is now only in form but not in substance, the 5% door may open, and sometimes suddenly, to a share of power. In a two-party system, which Hungary is clearly not, 50% plus a bit of a cushion (1-2% in the US, for instance) is required for victory. In a one-party system, which Hungary became in 2010, as much as a collaborative 55% or even a bit more of the vote might be necessary to dislodge the governing juggernaut.

Member

I don’t know Rasko well, but I interviewed him a few times in the 1990s. I was always impressed by the breadth of his knowledge and his excellent English.

If Momentum is the horse that Rasko has chosen to back, there is a definite argument in favor of giving the MSZP and DK wide berth. Rasko very likely figures that 2018 is already a lost cause (he has alluded to this in his FB posts) and he wants Momentum to remain untainted for 2022.

petofi
Guest

Nothing is as useless as a Hungarian-

I’ve been suffering through this heat wave.
We have air-conditioning and have also moved the Dyson into the bedroom. (I have a french air conditioner and it refuses to work more than seven hours a day.)
As an added measure, the pug has been evicted from the bedroom for breathing too quickly.

I fear that any day now a monster sun flare will reach and fry us all. I’m afraid most Hungarians will be too chewy to be good eating–it’s those stiff Fidesz opinions of theirs, I suppose.

wrfree
Guest

Uh oh petofi … you’re in a ‘dog day afternoon’…And I sweat like the frenchie conditioner after 7 hrs. don’t be too hard on the pug..ok?…. Im in the ‘dog days’ too.. may have to carry a refrig soon…

‘The Romans sacrificed a brown dog at the beginning of the Dog Days to appease the rage of Sirius, believing that the star was the cause of the hot, sultry weather. In modern times, the term refers to those hot, sleepy afternoons when dogs (and people) prefer to lay around and languish in the summer heat’ Imdb

petofi
Guest

@ wrfree

I had to say a mental apology to my pug before I wrote that sacrilegious part about him being barred
from the bedroom. (He’s a mentalist and knows my thoughts. He also knows I was funning.)

exTor
Guest

I thought you’d moved back to Canuckistan, petőfi?

MAGYARKOZÓ

petofi
Guest

exTor:

We did, for safety’s sake–I plan to make a run for it when they come for the jews again. Actually, we plan to spend summers in Budapest: you can’t beat the fruits and vegetables here. And, it must be said, life is considerably more personable here. Less civilized isolation.
I’ve really come to see the best side of Budapest in my current visit. But largely, with the exception of my effusions on Spectrum, I’ve left the politics and mores of Hungarians alone. I’ve become like the three monkeys…

Ferenc
Guest

After Pottyondy, today Kádár Barnabás left Momentum’s board.comment image
Both are on the right side in the picture, just a coincidence?
Info from http://24.hu/kozelet/2017/08/06/lemondott-meg-egy-elnoksegi-tag-a-momentumban/
It’s hard to believe that this has nothing to do with the news about their financial supporters and unwillingness to cooperate with other parties…
PS: if Momentum collapses, F-GA should be asked for the role of a young OV in ‘Downfall of the Mafia State’ (in German: ‘Der HUntergang’)

Dobberman
Guest

No, it is antisemitism.

Member

Look at these guys. You expect them to run a country? They look like they just wet their cribs.

exTor
Guest

Perspective is relative, Ferenc. The audience sees far right as far as Edina Pottyondy and Barnabás Kádár are table-situated, however those two are seated on the far left of the Momentum ‘leadership’.

MAGYARKOZÓ

exTor
Guest

Re your PS, Ferenc, which I only understood [untergang = downfall & HUntergang = downfall of Hungary] later after delving it, your suggestion that Fekete-Győr “should be asked [about] the role of a young [Orbán] in Downfall of the Mafia State” DID NOT CREATE any further understanding.

Please elaborate/elucidate. Thanx.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Ferenc
Guest

Recently there was something in the comments about a film about a look back to the Fidesz years. For me Momentum seems mostly a repeat of that former youth party, and F-GA really looks like (too much even?) a young OV!
Suggested film title I based on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downfall_(2004_film)
Regarding Momentum itself:
*does anybody know another country where ‘independent’ youth parties are started? I’m not aware about any, so what does this say about Hungary and it’s youth? Just simple arrogance, or something else?
*considering the background of their known financial supporters, this suggests that there is a lot of dissatisfaction with Fidesz under a part of the center-right electorate, there seem to be willingness and finances for supporting a party taking a position like the former Fidesz.

Guest

If I remember correctly, the German Greens at first would not accept anyone over 35 years …
As students in the glorious 1960s we would often say:
Traue keinem über dreißig!
Don’t trust anyone over 30 years!

PS:
There was a saying too (hopefully meant as a joke):
Wer zwei mal mit derselben pennt gehört schon zum Establishment!
If you have sex twice with the same woman – then you’re already part of the establishment ( i e the horrible conservative part of society)

Member

Orban’s simplified flowchart to channel the public money to friends:

“https://scontent-vie1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20622037_1803532462997391_6958754679298713008_n.jpg?oh=ebf30b2a5fab8bc91057ee79332a6482&oe=5A282D30”

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