The way the world is beginning to see Viktor Orbán’s Hungary

In the last three days three articles have appeared in two leading English-language newspapers, The New York Times and The Guardian, about the systemic corruption in the Orbán government. The word is out at last: a crime ring, run by Viktor Orbán himself, has taken hold of the Hungarian economy. The beneficiaries are the prime minister and his family as well as a few friends and political cronies.

The foreign press’s new-found interest in the criminal activities of Viktor Orbán was ignited by a short article that appeared in The Wall Street Journal exactly a month ago. It reported that OLAF, the European Commission’s Anti-Fraud Office, had sent a report to the Hungarian government recommending that the authorities take legal action over “serious irregularities” in projects carried out by a company that was controlled by the son-in-law of Viktor Orbán. The very fact that Hungarians had to learn about this damning report from a foreign source says a lot about the lack of transparency in Hungary.

It seems that after almost eight years of brazenly embezzling public funds, 80% of which come from the European Union, the friends and family of the Hungarian prime minister are finally coming under scrutiny. Detailed analyses are starting to plumb the depths of the systemic corruption that has made a small group of people very rich in record time. On the basis of calculations by responsible and usually accurate investigative journalists, Viktor Orbán’s hidden wealth may amount to 300 billion forints, more than a billion dollars.

One of the two Guardian articles by Jennifer Rankin neatly lists all the corruption cases that directly involve the Orbán family, including the growing wealth of Lőrinc Mészáros, which may be only partially his own. The list Rankin came up with is most likely incomplete because sub-contractors do not appear in the databases. Since most of these riches come from the European Union, Viktor Orbán’s anti-Brussels rhetoric is especially jarring. The conclusion is that, as Miklós Ligeti, head of legal affairs at Transparency International, put it, “Hungary is now in the grip of party state capture.”

The article ends with a question: will the European Union have the courage to do something about this theft of EU funds? Between 2014 and 2021 Hungary will have received €25 billion from the European Union, which makes the country one of the largest per capita recipients of the EU’s economic development funds. EU politicians are aware of the wholesale robbery that goes in Orbán’s Hungary, but for political reasons they are avoiding tackling the problem. Ingeborg Gräßle, head of the European Parliament’s budgetary committee who visited Hungary a few months ago to take a ride on Viktor Orbán’s rather expensive choo-choo train, merely says that a new kind of “semi-legal” irregularity is emerging in these post-communist countries, including Hungary. Otherwise, she estimates that in 36% of the cases there is only one bidder for EU-financed government projects, and, let me add, the remainder is most likely fixed. But that’s not all. According to András Inotai, a Hungarian economist, in 2017 5% of the country’s GDP came from EU funding while Hungary’s economic growth during the same period was about 4%. So, all that money is doing mighty little good.


Düsseldorf Carnival 2018

On February 10 an in-depth article appeared in The New York Times by Patrick Kingsley titled “As West Fears the Rise of Autocrats, Hungary Shows What’s Possible.” Hungary is described as “a political greenhouse for an odd kind of soft autocracy, combining crony capitalism and far-right rhetoric with a single-party political culture.” What follows is a detailed description of the process by which Viktor Orbán has managed to achieve his goal of an illiberal state. A former Fidesz official described the present Hungarian situation the following way: “sometimes I feel like I’m traveling in a time machine and going back to the ’60s…. All the characteristics and features on the surface are of democracy, but behind it there is only one party and only one truth.” Viktor Orbán is described as one of the strongmen of the age, alongside Vladimir Putin, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and Donald Trump. “Although Mr. Orbán lacks the global profile of those leaders, what he is doing in Europe is seen as part of a broader decline of democracy in the world.”

This is what Hungary looks like from New York and London. But what has been happening since the OLAF report detailing István Tiborcz’s alleged criminal activities was released? First of all, the government has come up with a strategy to divert responsibility from Orbán’s son-in-law to Lajos Simicska, Orbán’s old friend-in-crime, now enemy. This strategy may work on the propaganda level but it will not be sufficient to save Tiborcz from prosecution. But we ought not worry about the future of Ráhel Orbán and her husband. The Hungarian prosecutor’s office has already announced that its investigation of the case will be long and arduous. I have no doubt that after an inordinately long investigation Tiborcz will be found innocent of any wrongdoing. The government propaganda machinery also concocted the story that the European Union’s anti-Orbán forces timed the release of the report to coincide with the national election. It is with OLAF’s help that Soros’s men in Brussels want to remove Viktor Orbán from the seat of power.

Otherwise, all eyes are on Hódmezővásárhely, where István Tiborcz’s business career began. To recap the story: Orbán’s future son-in-law needed money and a contract to establish his business credentials, which he didn’t have. Both were provided through the good offices of the prime minister. Orbán convinced his favorite oligarch at the time, Lajos Simicska, to put some money into the young man’s firm. As collateral, Simicska demanded a share of the business. After two years, Tiborcz and his business partner paid the loan back and Simicska retired from this business venture, which he had never actually run. As for the needed contract, János Lázár, today chief-of-staff of Viktor Orbán but then still mayor of Hódmezővásárhely, suddenly had a burning desire to install new public lighting.

The sleepy little town is now all over the media as a result of the details of the project, which came to light thanks to 24.hu. So, Lázár felt that he had to give a press conference right on the spot. After a general denial of any wrongdoing, he offered a description of the town’s business venture with István Tiborcz. Lázár’s fairy tale about the bidding process and the details of what happened afterward is especially amusing if one reads old articles on the town’s internet news site called Vásárhely Hírek. While there, I also decided to read up on the special election campaign for mayor, which is in full swing at the moment.

The election will take place on February 25. Of course, the scandal around István Tiborcz also touches on the town and the election. There seems to be some anxiety in Fidesz circles about the outcome, although a couple of weeks ago I was certain that the independent candidate, Péter Márki-Zay, who lost his job after he declared his candidacy and was so maligned by his pro-Fidesz parish priest, had not the slightest chance of making a decent showing. But in the last few days commentators have pointed out that the Hódmezővásárhely election is a unique case in the sense that neither Jobbik nor the left-of-center parties have put up candidates and therefore Márki-Zay is facing the Fidesz candidate, Deputy-Mayor Zoltán Hegedűs, alone.

The town was planning to distribute 10,000 forint vouchers to pensioners sometime in March, just before Easter, but, behold, the decision was made to disburse them before the election. The prime minister also invited Hegedűs for a cup of coffee in his office in the parliament, and Defense Minister István Simicskó paid a visit to town to make sure that everybody knows that the old military barracks will be renovated and the Hódmezővásárhely shooting gallery will be the very first one to open in the whole country.

Political observers often complain about Hungarians’ indifference to corruption, which they tend to view as a fact of life. Perhaps there is hope. If Márki-Zay makes a good showing in a town where the deceased Fidesz mayor received 61% of the votes, followed by Jobbik with 17.1% and MSZP-DK-Együtt with 15%, it will give us a clue about public sentiment. A Márki-Zay win could have a measurable effect on the national election on April 8.

February 12, 2018
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exTor
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Erzsébet Bridge, built 1903, destroyed 1945 [January 18], rebuilt 1964.

February 13th marks the (Tuesday) end of the Siege of Budapest, which started the day before Christmas 1944 and lasted 50 days. During that period, the German military downed all Budapest’s bridges, which was done despite the objections of Hungarian officers fighting on the Nazi side.

The only bridge that was not disabled was the Árpád Bridge at the north end of Margit Island. The bridge had not been completed, thus nonfunctional. I’m sure that Éva has a few memories of the bridges that remained in the Danube for many years after the end of the war.

On a personal note, many maternal relatives lived in Csepel, which the Soviets cleared midJanuary 1945. Csepel’s many factories were making munitions for the German military even as the Red Army was advancing into Budapest from the outskirts. One of my mother’s first cousins –still alive– was born in Csepel a week after the Russians had come through and a couple of weeks before the Germans had hit the road for Vienna.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Guest

Here again Hungary was unlucky – Hitler also wanted Germany to go down with him and of course all occupied countries but there were some generals who opposed him there like the boss of occupied Paris who didn’t destroy the city.

There’s also a moving story about the workers in an Austrian salt mine in the Alps who hid a lot of stolen paintings etc and closed the entrance so the SS couldn’t find the artifacts to destroy. Later they told the American soldiers about them …
The Austrians made a movie about this.

Btw who destroyed the Budapest bridges? Was it the German army or their Hungarian fascist helpers?

wrfree
Guest

Re: occupied Paris

Some may know of the film ‘Diplomacy’ which came out in ’14. Gives a glimpse of the back and forth to hold off the destruction of the city. Hardly got any distribution here in the States. That’s the way ‘history’ goes sometimes around these parts.

exTor
Guest

comment image

Probably the Germans brought down the bridges, likely because they had the expertise and (most importantly) because the Hungarians could not be trusted to destroy their own bridges, especially after some of the Hungarian officers had protested the decision.

This is another view of Erzsébet Bridge. I use it as a laptop screentop. By the way, the calendars for 1945 and 2018 are exactly the same, which means that February 13th falls on a Tuesday both years.

BTW, since I am a total numbers freak, the above calendars are also identical to those for 1951 and 2001. Why do I mention those facts? My brother, who is exactly 500 days my junior, was born in 1951. He hit his midcentury mark on September 11th, 2001. He was still a firefighter at the time (in Toronto). That fact always blows me away. We lived in the same house. I am a former firefighter.

MAGYARKOZÓ

Alex Knisely
Guest

The NYTIMES article by Kingsley for some reason made no mention of the anti-Soros campaign and its dog-whistle anti-Semitism. Too much for that newspaper’s readers to handle, perhaps.

dos929
Guest
Again, ‘Too late and too little…’ reaction to the immense corruption, both economic and political, of the Orban regime and of Orban personally. More to the point; these observations and conclusions should have had come already well over 7 years ago when the blatant dictatorial tendencies and anti-democratic actions of Orban were clear even to the blind. Moreover, these very same observations should have been done by the EU and should have been followed up by real actions putting Orban on notice. Those billions of €’s were stolen, wasted or simply mismanaged to such a degree and in such a short time that it is unparalleled in modern Europe. Perhaps this disease of corruption has found its way into the EU itself, otherwise how a decent democratic citizen of the EU can reason the why’s and how’s of this scandal… What must happen for those leaders of the EU and the leaders of the European democracies to wake up? Will this be the same sorry saga that happened with North Korea and Iran when the respective world leaders fall asleep at the wheel and woken up only when it was already too late? As for the Hungarian EU citizens it… Read more »
tappanch
Guest

Ipsos poll in 27 countries, December 2017.

Which 3 of the following 17 topics do you find the most worrying in your country?
(The % sum of the 17 topics should add up to 300%)

Hungary
(The first 3 out of the 27 countries)

Healthcare: 72% (the most among the 27 countries) !!!
(Hungary: 72%, Poland: 62%, Brazil: 46%)

Financial & political corruption: 56% !!!
(South Africa: 68%, Malaysia: 64%, Peru: 60%)

Poverty & social inequality 56% !!!
(Russia: 58%, Hungary: 56%, Serbia: 53%)

Education: 21%
(Peru: 38%, Israel: 33%, Argentina: 30%)

Unemployment & jobs: 19%
(South Korea: 65%, Italy: 64%, Serbia: 62%)

Moral decline: 13%
(China: 37%, Japan: 26%, Serbia: 25%)

Crime & violence: 12%
(Mexico: 63%, South Africa: 63%, Peru: 62%)

Immigration Control: 11% !!
(Germany: 40%, Italy: 32%, Sweden: 29%)

Taxes: 8%
(Saudi Arabia: 43%, Italy: 39%, Canada: 30%)

Maintaining social programs: 6%
(Japan: 32%, China 31%, Sweden: 26%)

Childhood obesity: 5%

Climate change: 4%
(China 26%, Canada 20%, Germany: 17%)

Access to credit: 4%

Rise of extremism 4%
(UK: 21%, Sweden: 19%, Germany: 18%)

Inflation: 3%
(Argentina: 47%, China: 29%, Malaysia: 20%)

Terrorism: 3% !!
(Israel: 48%, Turkey: 47%, France: 38%)

Threats against the environment: 2%
(China: 42%, Poland: 17%, Russia: 15%)

https://www.ipsos.com/sites/default/files/ct/news/documents/2018-02/what-worries-the-world-great-britain-january-2018.pdf

wrfree
Guest
As to what Magyar respondents indicate as the most pressing problems in their country it does seem there is a dichotomy between thought and action. There is some but it doesn’t appear to be enough. Are they waiting perhaps for a savior to come out of the mists to bring things right? Toleration for criminals must have its limits. How long do they like to have their pockets picked? How far can toleration go before they really say ‘no mas’? Perhaps too long under the benevolent Kadarites has produced a somewhat stunted relationship between ruler and ruled. Some pernicious learning must have gone on. Just as in Kadar days, institutions and the population always worked within ‘the limits’. They took what was a ‘given’ and that was that. A sort of ‘self-censorship’ imposed itself on everybody in those ordered days. Each had a ghost hovering with an admonition .. ‘don’t even think of going there ‘gyerekek’. Ironically in these new days of a particular type of ‘democracy’ we apparently see it again in the face of immoral authority. Magyars should know slavery is beyond them. Time to dump the invisible chains and demand accountability for the position the leaders of… Read more »
tappanch
Guest

Fraud alert:

A.
Are the opposition parties organizing to have 2 observers in each precinct on election day?

B.
What is behind the rapid rise of the mail-in voters from Serbia (fraud ?)

C.
What is behind the quick rise on the ethnic German list (fraud ?)

For B. & C., see the numbers in my posts in the last few days.

tappanch
Guest

B.
Registered Serbian mail-in voters.
2018.01.11 to 2018.02.13: up 30.05%

Fidesz has already procured 4 to 5 seats from the 93 up for grab on the “party lists”.

C.
Registered ethnic German voters in Hungary.
2018.02.04 to 2018.02.13: up 11.03%

Fidesz wants to take away two cheap (1/4) seats (“Gypsy” and “German”) from the 93 as well.

There will be only 85 seats to divide among the parties on election day.

tappanch
Guest

I hope advisors & leaders of the opposition parties will read this report !

Orban & Fidesz propaganda are beating the wrong drums:
terrorism and immigration control are NOT important in Hungary.

Health care, corruption, social inequality – these are the topics the opposition should emphasize.

Member
“Perhaps there is hope. If Márki-Zay makes a good showing in a town where the deceased Fidesz mayor received 61% of the votes, followed by Jobbik with 17.1% and MSZP-DK-Együtt with 15%, it will give us a clue about public sentiment. A Márki-Zay win could have a measurable effect on the national election on April 8.” Dear Eva, I must argue, still, that the chances of Orban missing his 2/3 goal in 2018 is zero. If there is the slightest risk of this happening, Fidesz and its fawning millions will resort to all manner of dirty tricks. Just look at how the servile media is committing blatant libel against Egyutt’s Peter Juhasz, who may have actually had a chance of defeating the KDNP’s Istvan Hollik in Budapest’s first election district (my district). It would have been a long shot, given the steadfast Fidesz support in Budapest Districts I and V, as well as the presence of the LMP and Andras “Bearded Dandy” Fekete-Gyor on the ballot. However, District IX voters are super angry about corruption in their Fidesz-controlled municipal government. A strong opposition vote in Ferencvaros could just possibly have tipped the scales against a weak candidate such as Hollik.… Read more »
Member

Pascal’s Wager vs. the Power of Negative Thinking

Alex, If you really could know (as no one can) that everything you’ve said here was inevitable, what would be the point of proclaiming it?

Pascal’s Wager dictates that whether or not everything is hopeless the only hope is to proceed on the assumption that there is hope.

Member

Everything I mentioned has already been documented. I am saying Fidesz will stop at nothing (short of murder) to ensure their continued grip on power. Voting is just a formality.

As far as hope goes: Every Dec. 5 I put a boot in front of my door and I hope that an old man in a red suit with a white beard will magically arrive and fill it with chocolate overnight. Since I turned 12, the boot has been empty every Dec. 6 morning.

With due respect, anyone who thinks “hoping” is going to help defeat Fidesz is kidding themselves. You cannot defeat an illiberal system through liberal-democratic means.

wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘hoping’

Maybe too much of this is going around individually in the country?

‘Hope for the worst and you will never be disappointed’.

Ferenc
Guest

“You cannot defeat an illiberal system through liberal-democratic means.”
In advance accepting to be defeated neither.
So what’s your suggestion for getting rid of OV&Co?

Member
It’s not a simple “suggestion.” It will be a hell of a long process. At the present time, I am not convinced we could avoid bloodshed. I have outlined my views in past posts. Briefly, the opposition is going to have to unify (except Jobbik). The MSZP will have to self-destruct and leave a new standard bearer to pick up the debris. The new opposition force is going to have to make itself indispensible to a large swathe of voters, not just in Budapest and major cities. That’s going to take money, sweat and tears. Popping in to Kalman Olga’s studio a couple times a month is not going to cut it. They are going to have to create the kind of bond with voters that Fidesz has forged over the years. This bond must be strong enough to make people want to betray their short-term interests — that is, to vote against Fidesz despite the inevitable backlash. Should the opposition win, they are going to have to get rid of the Constitution and cardinal laws because these make it impossible for anyone to govern except Fidesz. That is going to require convincing the public of the need for a… Read more »
Ferenc
Guest

I think you’re overestimating the “bond of voters with Fidesz”.
First “Fidesz voters” are a minority (OK, the biggest one, but a minority).
Second I’ve (in the past) spoken with quite some Fidesz voters, who considered OV a real leader, but NOT a sympathetic one! So when his “leadership” will be proven to them as not more than corruption, I can not imagine that they’ll keep voting for “him” (or others from his party).
Third the new generation of voters is more against OV than older generations, i.e.even at the students at Debrecen University are in a big majority against OV (though don’t know who they’re favoring). Furthermore future generations of voters (current gymnasium kids) seem to be again a step more against OV&Co.
Now OV&Co may have manipulated “the authorities” in their favor, but if voted out by a clear majority, those authorities should get in serious trouble when not respecting that. It will most of all depend on them if the unavoidable change will get dirty (or may be even bloody)…

Member

I guess we disagree on this. My bet that Fidesz gets 2/3 in April remains open to anyone willing to wager a beer. (Or other simliarly priced drink. Not at one of Vizoviczki’s strip joints.)

Jim
Guest

Perhaps the rest of the world will start to see Hungary for what it is but
unfortunately it’s not the way Hungary seems to see itself. Here it’s business as usual, the corrupt remain in control doling out rewards to the loyal few and not giving a damn about the impoverished many. Rich retired artists who support Fidez just received a big pension bonus. On top the paltry pension of monthly 50000 huf the government just decided after such important service to the country artists (of a certain pedigree) would get an additional 100000 a month for life. Meanwhile those who actually worked for a living making the country survivable will themselves continue to eek out an existence on there piddly pensions. But then of course rich artists couldn’t survive without privilege and the poor are use to going without.

Marty
Guest

In Sri Lanka a few years ago an Orban-like figure Mahindra Rajapaksa was finally ousted in a presidential election. During his tenure Rajapaksa looted the state, his entire family became unbelievably rich, obtained all the best properties in the best coastal towns (Orban also bought up half the Balaton) etc. However, as part of a backroom deal Rajapaksa was not prosecuted -even though, in addition to the looting he probably gave orders to kill several journalists. Rajapaksa bided his time and now he’s back and will probably win the next general elections, he just won the municipal one.

The point is: if Orban is ousted unless he’s dealt with swiftly he will be back in a year or two. His political instrastructure will remain intact, his money, cronies will remain intact, and he can just put media pressure on any new (coalition) government and wait until it self-destructs. Orban must be prosecuted as well as his family members – otherwise he’ll be back in no time to continue what he’s been doing.

Observer
Guest

Yes, the whole orban mafia must be destroyed – physically imprisoned, banned from holding public office and financially disabled, we are taking thousands of corrupt functionaries and tens of thousands of smaller, local riders on.
However this process would go against the tradition, requiring exceptional political will and smart agencies to carry it out. After the current disaster there may be political will and the de-orbanisation is doable, by good technocrats. While not easy, if started in earnest it will develop a self sustained momentum, for some time at least. It will be a kind of revolution, or not at all.

Member

Agree.

tappanch
Guest

Where to steal from ?

The three biggest categories of EU money flowing into Hungary:
cohesion + farm subsidies + competitiveness.
in millions of EUR.

2007: 1304.2 + 956.2 + 61.6 = 2322.0
2008: 1188.6 + 681.1 + 74.9 = 1944.6
2009: 2174.4 +1279.9 + 66.6 = 3520.9
2010: 2086.2 +1420.1 + 86.0 = 3592.3

2011: 3637.1 +1500.0 + 111.5 = 5248.6
2012: 2377.7 +1605.4 + 142.0 = 4125.1
2013: 3908.5 +1778.3 + 178.3 = 5865.1
2014: 4454.5 +1894.6 + 232.2 = 6581.3
2015: 3693.2 +1791.4 + 81.5 = 5566.1
2016: 2738.5 +1667.2 + 98.0 = 4503.7

tappanch
Guest

Frank Engel, a centre-right Luxembourg MEP:

“Getting public contracts now in Hungary is a matter of friendship and not a matter of merit,[…]
where else in the European Union would you have a system where public contracts of significant size go to
family members of the head of government? I don’t think that happens anywhere else.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/feb/12/orban-allies-could-use-eu-as-cash-register-meps-say

Istvan
Guest

A representative from Luxembourg would know, because there is enough money from Hungarian oligarchs stashed there, or in Malta, or used as transfer points to Panama that their own complicity with this corruption is evident. Even György Gattyán the professional pornographer who has long been considered Hungary’s most wealthy citizen took his business to Luxembourg.

In the European edition of Forbes we can read this quote from Gattyán: “I am Hungarian, I was born Hungarian and I have nothing against this country and its current political system. Everyone can have different opinions, arguments and counterarguments, whether this is good for the country or not, but we are working, doing our business, and producing value thanks to our work. That’s all I can do for Hungary.” (http://www.doclerholding.com/static/press/Forbes-Hungary-2017-Gattyan-Gyorgy.pdf )

Tappanch the EU’s complicity with the corruption in Hungary is profound, by the way the Swiss play their role too as do some US bankers I suspect.

Observer
Guest

But Gattyàn also said “you can’t just take away this business”, no prize for guessing why did he say such thing.

tappanch
Guest

Istvan,

At least the big US banks have internal rules against doing business with people related to high level government officials abroad.

But there are obvious loopholes. For instance, if a corrupt official takes his/her money to Singapore (one of the 21 countries considered “clean”, i.e. less rigorously checked), the US bank will do business with him/her indirectly.

tappanch
Guest

Clean countries:
A. Anglo-Saxon worldwide ;
B. Western European (except Switzerland, Spain, Italy and the mini-states smaller than Lux);
C. three Asian countries (Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore)

Ferenc
Guest

Your reasoning: a few EU persons are assisting or at least not going against corruption in HU, so the whole EU is complicit in HU corruption…
To be honest I really get so pissed off by such blinkered thinking! It only indicates a basic anti-EU stance (for whatever reason).
As a EU citizen I have quite some mixed thoughts about the current operation of the EU democratic institutions, but overall they have a positive effect on my life. And, what’s even more important, I think they will have a more positive effect in the future on the life of my children! That’s what counts for me first of all!!

Ferenc
Guest

OT – HU public/state media
LMP wanted to release a press statement through MTI relating to the OLAF-Elios case. Knowing MTI’s sensitivity regarding people close to OV, LMP wrote “a T.Istvánhoz köthető Elios Innovatív Zrt.” [abbreviated name!]. Even that was unacceptable for the public/state MTI.
https://index.hu/belfold/2018/02/12/az_mti_mar_egy_t._istvanos_kozlemenyt_sem_mer_lehozni/

Checked through google, if Hungarian public/state media, Hirado/MTVA/MTI, are currently censoring the news, i.e.keeping the full name of OV’s son-in-law out of their items?
Search: Tiborcz – Results in 2018: 5
https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Ahirado.hu+Tiborcz&tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2018
Search: Elios – Results in 2018: 22
https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Ahirado.hu+Elios&tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2018
Conclusion: OF COURSE!!

Will smith
Guest

More liberal bias from typical liberal scoures….they are always so clean and perfect….shit disturberglobalists…u have messed up ur countries….dont mess up others

Jean P
Guest

Liberal sources are more trustworthy than illiberal sources.

Ferenc
Guest

OT – God’s Migrant Workers (30min, docu)
In Bavaria every sixth catholic priest is from abroad. With the church having problems recruiting inside Germany men of the cloth from India and Africa havefilled these posts. A report on their experiences in small-town (south) Germany.
available 3 more days (till Feb.16) at https://www.arte.tv/en/videos/072496-009-A/re-god-s-migrant-workers/ (German sound, English subtitles)

PS: anybody knows about such in HU? and if none, can imagine when such possible in HU?

tappanch
Guest

The Orban government wants to ban the NGO’s it chooses.

(NGOs have to get a new permit from the government to continue working, if they are considered to be connected to “migration”) .

https://444.hu/2018/02/13/az-emberek-velemenyere-hivatkozva-vegul-jelentosen-megszigoritva-nyujtottak-be-a-stop-soros-torvenycsomagot-a-parlamentnek

Observer
Guest

Yes, it’s FASCISM folks, where “szabad emberek azt csinàljàk ami szabad” – in a free country free people do what is made free (allowed).

J Simon
Guest

Top 10 Ways the US is the Most Corrupt Country in the World
http://www.juancole.com/2013/12/corrupt-country-world.html
.Just How Corrupt is America? You May Be Surprised to Find Out

Just two links for you to read on the Internet before you go into a feeding frenzy about Hungary.

Ferenc
Guest

Well US corruption isn’t surprising .
Did you check also the posts about Hungary on that site? Smashing reading!!
“Ottomans saved Hungarian PM Orban’s Ancestors; now he says Islam never part of Europe”
https://www.juancole.com/2015/10/hungarian-ancestors-protected.html
“2017: The Rise of the Demagogues: Trump & the Euro-Populists”
https://www.juancole.com/2017/01/demagogues-trump-populists.html

J Simon
Guest

Top 10 Ways the US is the Most Corrupt Country in the World
http://www.juancole.com/2013/12/corrupt-country-world.html
.Just How Corrupt is America? You May Be Surprised to Find Out

Two links for you on the Internet before you go into a feeding frenzy about Hungary.

Aida
Guest

The article is miles wide of the mark if its true aim is to demonstrate the extent of corruption in the US. It is spot on in highlighting many features of the system and practices that many of us on this blog might not think desirable. An underlying feature of corruption is dishonesty. Or in other words receiving rewards without any reasonably held belief as to any lawful entitlement to it.

By contrast, for example the Orban regime have erected a wall to conceal the illegal and dishonest receipt of funds thereby encouraging and indeed joining in the conspiracy to cheat and to embezzle. Hence his is a Mafia state, tolerated by and frequently assisted by the authorities whose task would be to bring the offenders to justice.

Observer
Guest

Fidesznik Joe,
So, the US is corrupt, and Orban never lied, ah?
But what has the US to do with the Orban corruption ?
Joe, this is not your cup of tea here, better go challenge the “rural” folk.

Jean P
Guest

The US is more corrupt than Hungary. Ergo corruption in Hungary is nothing to speak of.

wrfree
Guest

Just saying…

The world will look quite a bit different to some if and when Russia and China get ‘halfsies’ when it comes to the globe.😎 Over and out.

Jean P
Guest

Beats me.

Zoli
Guest

You mean to say the way the left marxist-globalists see Hungary? The same way they saw Hungary as soon as Orban won in 2010, a painful loss to the marxist-globalist cause. Ever since then, most leftist media coverage of Hungary has been negative. Have to say however that it does not seem to influence general public perceptions as much as you think it would. All Europeans who oppose the mass colonization of Europe see him as a hero. Regionally, even many Romanians who are otherwise committed anti-Hungarian bigots often express the fact that they wish they had a pragmatic leader like Orban.

Guest

Zoli just look at this – these are the real problems of the poor Hungarians:
By contrast, the top three issues for Hungarians were healthcare (where Hungary topped the list with 72% of respondents), financial or political corruption (56%), and poverty and social inequality (likewise 56%, second only to Russia on 58%).

Unemployment concerned only 19% of Hungarians sufficiently for them to name the issue in their top three, while crime and violence worried only 12% of Hungarian respondents.

Strikingly, despite the Hungarian governmentʼs blanket propaganda on the issue, only 11% named immigration control among their major concerns (compared to 40% in Germany and 32% in Italy), while just 3% of Hungarians cited terrorism.
https://bbj.hu/analysis/76-of-hungarians-in-poll-say-country-on-the-wrong-track_145363
Seems your compatriots are more intelligent than you idiotic troll!
Even with all the Fidesz loonie propaganda they can’t forget their real problems – like no health service, not even toilet paper for the poor hospital patients …
I’m sure you live far, far away in some blessed “Western” country – why don’t you go back to your fatherland?

Aida
Guest

Maybe they should ask Orban to be their PM. It would solve two problems at once.
But there is some anti corruption movement there, so dear Viktor might have a problem.
We, the so-called Marxist globalists see the present rulers of Hungary as fit only for extended terms of imprisonment. Preferably in a Hungarian jail.
Those who regard a corrupt cleptogarch chief as a hero clearly have a problem and may need a term of years living in Hungary.
Clearly Zoli, you cannot be serious.