The sorry state of the Hungarian opposition

In the last three days the government propaganda machine has been busy churning out gory stories about the domestic affairs of Péter Juhász, chairman of Együtt. In a way, these latest accusations against Juhász should not have been unexpected. He is a controversial man whose life has been under scrutiny for a long time. Since he was at one point a vocal proponent of legalizing marijuana, he was accused of being a regular drug user. There have also been questions about his finances. His political enemies, who are numerous, found his lifestyle far too lavish in view of his extremely modest income. A father of three small children with a non-working partner, he claimed to live more or less on charity.

One of the problems with Juhász as a politician is that he comes from a civic activist background, and his transformation has not been seamless. He has always been attracted to unusual methods of protest, which I personally found politically futile. A small group of people armed with whistles may make Viktor Orbán uncomfortable for a few minutes, but it is not the most effective way of protesting the increasingly oppressive regime of Viktor Orbán. And Juhász’s efforts to call attention to the incredible corruption in District V (downtown Budapest) were worthy, but I questioned his tactic of staging less than successful anti-corruption demonstrations. These anemic mini-demonstrations only reinforced the perception of the opposition’s powerlessness and lack of followers.

Juhász also has the bad habit of talking too much about himself and his problems. Unfortunately, he is simply unable to refrain from engaging in a dialogue or an argument. Now that the government media got hold of some court records in connection with Juhász’s parting with his girlfriend of nine years and his fight over visitation rights for his children, he couldn’t stop himself from telling the world the exact nature of his encounter with the mother of his children. The case is still pending, and admitting details that may not serve his interest is outright foolish. A give and take between these former partners on the pages of Facebook is also not the smartest move.

The right-wing government media accuses opposition papers of simply ignoring the case because the events described in the court documents reflect badly on one of their own. After all, Juhász, whose party took a stand against domestic violence, is now being accused of physically and psychologically abusing the mother of his children. It is true that relatively few opposition papers ran stories about Juhász. Even Alfahír, the online news site of Jobbik, ignored the story. In fact, János Volner, Jobbik’s deputy chairman who was himself the object a somewhat similar attack, expressed his sympathy for the beleaguered Juhász. One reason for the left-of-center media’s reluctance to cover the story is that they were disinclined to rely on the reporting of government propaganda outlets like 888, Pesti Srácok, and Ripost. They know from experience that their stories are pieced together from half-truths and under scrutiny don’t stand up.

But it is not true that all respectable left-of-center papers ignored the story. Both HVG and Index devoted a couple of articles to the Juhász case. Index’s article is balanced. It quotes Juhász’s own defense on his blog but at the same time reports that Juhász admitted to Index that he and his girlfriend had a scuffle in which the woman could have been hurt. HVG takes a much stronger position in an article by Judit Windisch. It is immaterial whether the accusations are well founded or not, says Windisch. “Juhász lost the political match; from here on he can fight only for his children.” This assessment may be harsh, but I’m afraid it is an accurate description of the situation.

Juhász’s problem is certainly not good news for Együtt, which under his joint stewardship with Viktor Szigetvári has become totally isolated. Gergely Karácsony and Párbeszéd left them and joined MSZP, and in the last year or so a lot of people have abandoned the party. The last person of note to jump ship was Zsuzsa Szelényi, Együtt’s only member of parliament, who left the party partly because Juhász and Szigetvári were ready to strike a deal with Fidesz during the debate over advertising surfaces and partly because she disapproved of Együtt’s inflexibility during the inter-party negotiations.

Today’s papers reported that Együtt is starting a “telephone campaign” next week. Juhász and the Együtt candidate in each electoral district will phone people and urge them to support their party. Whom are these people kidding? Yes, the party will receive financial support from the budget, but they should keep in mind that if they don’t garner at least 1% of the popular vote that money will have to be paid back. In the interim, they only splinter the already terribly fragmented opposition.

Originally, during the MSZP-DK negotiations, two Budapest electoral districts were left open for Együtt and Párbeszéd: District I and District XXI. The assumption all along was that it would be Péter Juhász who would stand against István Hollik (KDNP) in District I, who had replaced the terribly unpopular Antal Rogánas Fidesz’s candidate. Winning the seat in this very conservative district would be a long shot under the best of circumstances, but with this new baggage Juhász’s chances are nil. And there is no one else who can successfully challenge Hollik. The hopelessness of the situation became clear this evening when five contenders for the District I seat gathered for a debate. Hollik didn’t show. His excuse was that these opposition figures are George Soros’s agents.

From left to right: Pál Losonczy (Jobbik), Márta V. Naszály (MSZP-Párbeszéd), Antal Csárdi (LMP), Péter Juhász (Együtt), and András Fekete-Győr (Momentum), Electoral District #1

The interest in the debate was considerable, and not surprisingly most of the questions centered on the candidates’ opinion about the chances of winning, given the fractured opposition, which the gathering amply demonstrated. Jobbik was represented by Pál Losonczy, who is currently a member of the district council. András Győr-Fekete of Momentum would like to win in this district, as would Antal Csárdi of LMP, who in 2014 was LMP’s candidate for mayor and received 5.69% of the votes. Naturally, Péter Juhász was also present, but because MSZP-Párbeszéd couldn’t agree with Együtt about coordinated candidacies, MSZP has its own candidate, Márta V. Naszály (Párbeszéd). Thus, currently there are six candidates, counting Fidesz-KDNP’s István Hollik, to represent the district in the next parliament. This gathering, if nothing else, gives us an accurate picture of the total chaos that exists in opposition forces.

The audience apparently urged them to unite, but only MSZP-Párbeszéd’s Naszály asked everybody to stand behind one candidate who would represent the democratic opposition. LMP’s Csárdi was the most inflexible, and he was met with disapproval from the audience. The overwhelming desire to have a united front is obvious at public gatherings and call-in-shows on Klub Rádió and ATV’s Fórum. If nothing happens between now and April 8, a Fidesz win is inevitable. The only question is just how large a win.

February 13, 2018

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46 Comments on "The sorry state of the Hungarian opposition"

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Ferenc
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Why didn’t they put a “cardboard Hollik” at the debate?
Just make complete clowns of all politicins, not willing to show up at debates. Ask “them” the questions, and make clear “they” don’t want to (are afraid to) speak in front of real people!!
PS: in that way it could even become the present ones against the cardboard one, which pushes opposition even more to unite or at least work together…

Member
I believe Juhasz is the only opposition candidate who could have won the Budapest first electoral district, unity or no unity. This district includes the Castle District (Budapest District I) the Belvaros (District V) and the northern part of Ferencvaros (District IX), where I live. Juhasz is the only true politician among the crop of opposition candidates. The exception is arguably Fekete-Gyor, who has succeded in irritating more people than he has impressed during his short political career. Juhasz, whatever his faults, sends out fliers with his personal cell phone number so people can call him. While Fidesz’s support remains rock-solid in the Castle District, the party has always had mixed support in District V and is vulnerable in District IX, where the Fidesz local government is swimming in corruption. With the right campaign manager, Juhasz’s weaknesses could have been turned into assets. Not least of which is the mother of Juhasz child #4, Gabriella Hamori, an actress who frequently appears in celebrity tabloids and is popular among men thanks to the many steamy scenes in which she has appeared. Hollik is disliked by many people who see him as a retrograde Catholic. The district’s current MP, Antal Rogan, would… Read more »
Ferenc
Guest

Thanks for your insights from the ground!!

I like to add some slogans to use:
nincs megjegyzések vitákban, nincs ülés a parlamentben
no comments in debates, no seat in the parliament

And one party’s name needs correction: from F. into TiFéSz
Titkos (Secret): pénz (TAO), strómanok, menekültek (money, strawmen, refugees)
Félős (Afraid): nincs viták, elkerülnek parlamentet es bizottságokat (no debates, avoid parliament and committees)
Szánalmasság (Miserliness)

Guest

The whole thing is really unbelievable!
Just consider this:
Hungary, however, showed one of the highest rates of respondents believing their country is on the wrong track, at 76%, surpassed in this respect only by Mexico (82%), Italy (82%), and Brazil (83%).
https://bbj.hu/analysis/76-of-hungarians-in-poll-say-country-on-the-wrong-track_145363
Why can’t the opposition use this discontent?
PS:
And we constantly read that people adore Orbán sooo much … 🙂

Something’s really rotten in the state of Hungarians’ minds!

Marty
Guest
Együtt as a party is absolutely finished. Szigetvári and Juhász are only playing for the state subsidies which will come if they have enough local candidates running (ie. against the other leftists) and if Együtt reaches 1% of the votes cast. Those susbidies would allow Szigetvári and Juhász to continue to have jobs for the future (neither had a real job ever, Juhasz maybe 15 years ago the last time as some low level bank officer). Együtt was always just a vehicle for Gordon Bajnai so without him it’s not a surprise that Együtt is dead in the water. Juhász himself is finished too with this sordid story. At least Fideszniks know whom to marry, their wives are silent, nobody speaks against the interests of the party. Juhasz couldn’t control his girfriend and this in itself a sign that he’s not a very good politician. He should’ve chosen somebody who is 100% behind him, there’s no politics without total family support. Juhasz’ new girlfirend (the mother of his newborn child, born just in the middle of the campaign, no marriage either) is an actress of all professions. Juhasz worked a lot but in this system not even hard working people… Read more »
Member

“At least Fideszniks know whom to marry, their wives are silent, nobody speaks against the interests of the part”

Oh yes, those wives are told to be very silent (or else) when their “better halves” give them a good kicking and potter off with their 16 year old girl friends on Friday night down Zichy Utca.

Domestic abuse is, unfortunately, a way of life in Hungary and Fidesz remains silent on this issue for obvious reasons.

nimh
Guest

“Domestic abuse is, unfortunately, a way of life” — and maybe part of the broader problems of mentality involved are reflected in highly problematic remarks like this:

“Juhasz couldn’t control his girfriend and this in itself a sign that he’s not a very good politician.”

Marty
Guest

Hey, this time it is Juhasz who stands accused of domestic abuse just to be clear. Something by the way he did not really deny.

I totally oppose any kind of abuse or physical aggression no exceptions. To be honest I just can’t imagine how anybody can be in a situation with his spouse having euphemistically a “dulakodás”.

All I am saying is that “szegény embert az ág is húzza”. Opposition politicians are in a difficult situation anyway and now this too – fideszniks without fail seem cover this angle somehow. I don’t know how they do it but sure as shit nobody speaks out no spouse, no child, nephew, cousin, mother, grandfather etc. Unity and discipline in a campaign are an absolute must, however. Juhasz failed in that.

I don’t want to criticize Juhasz’ personal choices too much but I’m not sure it shows great political judgment to have an unplanned baby timed right for the middle of a campaign that should make or break his party. I’m sorry, Juhasz was a well-meaning guy but the system broke him and he went insane.

Member

“Hey, this time it is Juhasz who stands accused of domestic abuse just to be clear. Something by the way he did not really deny.”

If he is found to be guilty, then, of course, there is no excuse.

My wider point being that beating up your partner and the lesser sin of “extra-marital” sex etc is an accepted part of Hungarian nationalist and more specifically Fidesz “culture” an acceptance which goes right up to the top.

That acceptance enables domestic abuse to thrive in Hungary. Now if origo.hu and the other fascist sewer rags start a campaign against domestic abuse then I will be first to support them. But they won’t, because it would be too uncomfortable for their paymasters.

Marty
Guest
District 5 (as one of the 23 administrative districts of Budapest) is not a left-leaning district at all. District 5 used to be clamped together with the southern part of district 13 (the single most liberal/leftist district in Hungary) creating a joint electoral district. With such votes from district 13 sometimes it looked like leftist could win, but in fact most of those living in district 5 were conservative (anti-communist). Now, under a new electoral system, district 5 is clamped together with district 1 (aka the Castle district) which is the second most conservative district in the country after distrcit 12 of Budapest. At no point could a non-right wing candidate win in district 1 since 1990. Also both district 5 and 1 have above-average rates of pensioners who – let’s just say – don’t especially like liberals and pro-drug people. Juhász is well-known in the district to be for the legalization of drugs which in Hungary is as popular as offering more taxpayer’s money in Mississipi to welfare queens in Cadillacs. It’s a real liberal idiocy: you alienate 95% of the voters and you don’t gain anything. In other words district 5 is totally hopeless even if all the… Read more »
Member

I agree with you about District 1.

As far as District V goes, there is a strong leftie element that could conceivably challenge Fidesz. You won’t find it in the Vadasz utca retirement home, but you see it clearly in the area around Falk Miksa and CEU.

Yes, District V liked Mayor Rogan, especially when he ran with support from Jobbik and MIEP, as he did in 2006. However, District V also liked Mayor Pal Steiner (MSZP) enough to elect him twice. They voted for MPs such as Ivan Vitanyi (ex MSZP, now DK) and Ivan Peto (SZDSZ). True, VItanyi and Peto had support from the southern part of District 13.

Looking at Budapest’s first election district: In the 2014 general election, the individual candidates for Left-Wing Coalition plus LMP combined won just about as many votes as Rogan did. If you combine Rogan plus Jobbik, the lefties were behind by about 8%. Not an insurmountable lead.

Marty
Guest
I certainly hope that Fidesz is ousted but I don’t hold my breath. With the addition of the Castle District in fact I don’t see it happening. Castle District people are the very opposite of liberal or leftist. The entire current election system was set up so that the opposition could perhaps imagine winning with some luck but in reality it just won’t (can’t) happen. Back in 2010 Fidesz crunched the numbers and set up the single best election system which favors the structural characteristics of Fidesz. Hungary is not a democracy, remember. It’s a simulacrum of democracy. Of course it would be better if the opposition would be less idiotic and corrupt but that’s part of the system, part of the simulation. By definition the system cannot allow any real opposition to rise and potentially challange Fidesz. In an extreme scenario the ruling party would get rid of Orban just like ANC is now getting rid of Jacob Zuma (or MPLA got rid of Dos Santos or ZANU PF got rid of Mugabe, both a few months ago) – but ANC (just like MPLA or ZANU PF) is here to stay, just like Fidesz is here to stay. A… Read more »
wrfree
Guest

Re: ‘Fidesz …here to stay’

For awhile. But if the past is any indication they too will go on to the ash heap. Parties with vile ideas like theirs have their glory in the sun but in the end are in probabilities doomed to failure. Their lack of moral probity especially will take care of that.

Political ‘machines, empires indeed get long runs but if they don’t get destroyed from without the collapse the will come from within as keeping up with lies as truth inevitably generates internal contradictions that would be hard to control.

Fidesz is having its heyday. But all things go to dissolution. And the Fidesz ‘scientists’ cannot stop it no matter if they keep changing the variables.

Member

“ANC (just like MPLA or ZANU PF) is here to stay, just like Fidesz is here to stay.”

There is a big difference. I don’t know much about the MPLA, but the ANC and ZANU PF were both revolutionary movements with deep roots in their countries before Zuma and Mugable took them over. Fidesz, by contrast, has no raison d’etre without Orban. Since 1991 or so, it has never been anything except Orban’s private club. If Orban were ousted, I bet Fidesz would collapse as Rogan, Kover, Nemeth, Lazar and God knows who else tried to stake out their own claims.

Marty
Guest
Well, yes, but Fidesz entrenched itself in the last 20 years (ie. since 1998 when Fidesz was elected for the first time and then it lost by a few points in 2002) like no other party has. Fidesz supplanted all former right wing/conservataive power networks and set up an extremely comprehensive, controlled, managed system. Fidesz is probably more managed, evaluated, controlled than MSZMP was in the 1980’s. Fidesz’ deep-rooted system of clients, with cronies everywhere (which also fully coopted the nation-wide networks of traditional Christian churches) is absolutely comparable to anti-colonialist parties in Africa. (Moreover, Fidesz consistent anti-Brussels, anti-multinational corporation stance is ideologically also comparable to these parties’ anti-colonialist stance). Fidesz is the state itself in rural regions. if you want something to be done you look for Fidesznik connections not connections to state organizations because the latter are now entirely subordinate to Fidesz party structures (again, perhaps more so than in the 1980’s). I think Fidesz has entrenched itself extremely deeply the full extent of which many leftists in Budapest cannot even imagine – because they (after 1990, that is) never really had the ambition, imagination to dominate politics. Fidesz had that ambition and outside Budapest Fidesz is the… Read more »
Member
“Moreover, Fidesz consistent anti-Brussels, anti-multinational corporation stance is ideologically also comparable to these parties’ anti-colonialist stance.” No Hungarian ever got their head stomped by a jackbooted Tesco executive or had their home raided by a Commisioner for Digital Economy and Society. No Hungarian ever left his family to live in a rebel training camp in Ukraine where Orban personally trained them in techniques for resisting torture. Indeed, Hungarians who curse Tesco also love the low(ish) prices and variety. Many Hungarians who curse the EU are actually desperate for the EU’s respect. There are plenty of Hungarians who are unswervingly loyal to Orban – by my unscientific estimate, about 20% of the people who vote, which is enormous. But if Orban were to go away, I think Fidesz would flop around like a decapitated fish for a few years and then die. There is absolutely no unifying ideology or outside threat that would keep Orban’s crew rowing in the same direction. Mandela was succeded by Mbeki beause the ANC is a real party with multiple potential leaders. Mbeki was ousted by Zuma because the ANC has multiple power bases and Mbeki pissed off the wrong people. Fidesz is not a real… Read more »
Marty
Guest

Don’t you agree that black Africans also envy white British, the French or other rich white folks? They are anti-white at home (eg voting for Mugabe) but still shop at white-owned stores or buy stuff that was produced in the country of their former colonial masters. People are contradictory. Hungarians shop at Tesco or Aldi but at the same time complain that foreign multinationals smother small Hungarian producers and hate such multinationals. Voters are not consistent, but that’s totally human. They do support Orban’s hard-liner stance on multinationals (how he tormented banks etc.) even if such voters then buy foreign cars or whatever. At the same time such voters hate that leftists who seem to give in to foreign pressure all the time – even if such voters know well that there is no choice but to accept what the EU says. But voters still want the show, still want their politicians to pretend that they are tough and stand up to Brussels. This is politics – you need to feel what the people demand like such transparent shows, the peackock dance with Brussels.

Guest

But according to Ipsos 76% of respondents believing their country (Hungary) is on the wrong track – so what does that tell us about the people and the regime?
By contrast, the top three issues for Hungarians were healthcare (where Hungary topped the list with 72% of respondents), financial or political corruption (56%), and poverty and social inequality (likewise 56%, second only to Russia on 58%).
Unemployment concerned only 19% of Hungarians sufficiently for them to name the issue in their top three, while crime and violence worried only 12% of Hungarian respondents.
Strikingly, despite the Hungarian governmentʼs blanket propaganda on the issue, only 11% named immigration control among their major concerns …

Really strange!

Marty
Guest

But wolfi the election is not about whether the country is on a wrong track but about which party to give the political leadership to – from a limited number of viable options, all in a rigged election system, with an unparalleled Fidesznik GOTV machinery.

If it was a presidential election with two rounds I think Orban could be beaten – but he doesn’t do two-round elections obviously.

exTor
Guest

comment image

Happy Val Day everybody. Perhaps the image of a heart will do something for the Magyar condition. Coincidentally, this day also happens to be Ash Wednesday, the first time since 1945 –a year that was also remembered yesterday– that Ash Wednesday and Valentine Day have come together. That means that Easter will fall on April Fool’s Day. The next such concurrence will not occur until 2029, although Ash Wednesday will again coincide with Val Day during 2024, however that year Easter will occur one day earlier [March 31st] because of the existence of the leapyear. Whew !!!

MAGYARKOZÓ

wrfree
Guest

That cynical Frenchman Mirabeau had really someting to say about ‘love’ as it…

‘…..has the power of making you believe what you would normally treat with the deepest suspicion’…😎 Yeah… we can see that in some cases love can be blind alright!

Aida
Guest

The poor fellow was dead in 1791 age 42. Probably lucky because he might have been executed for duplicity. The description of love attributed to him is very superficial. It certainly has the power to distort common sense and sober judgment. I would rather listen to Edit Piaf singing about it.
Best way to enjoy his memory is to take lunch at the Deux Garçons in the Cours Mirabeau in Aix en Provence whilst enjoying the shade given by the splendid ”platans”.

tappanch
Guest

“Il étudie à la faculté de droit de l’université d’Aix-en-Provence”

Guest

Oh la la, Aix en Provence! 🙂
Btw my German hometown’s sister town …

tappanch
Guest

Here is the text of the anti-NGO bill. Fidesz needs a 2/3 majority of the MPs PRESENT to pass it.

http://www.parlament.hu/irom40/19776/19776.pdf

My summary:
A minister in Orban’s government decides which NGOs require permit in the future. They can ask for a permit. If the answer is no, the NGO can appeal to a “közigazgatási” judge (this judicial terrain is already under Fidesz control). The judge can ask the minister to re-examine the request for permit.

If the organization continues to work without a permit, the prosecutor and/or the Hungarian IRS should fine it out of existence and later formally ban it.

Observer
Guest

As expected, the amendments are coming fast, in violation of parliamentary procedure and, I suppose, the basic law, not to speak about the basic legal principles of the western democracies.
It’s a rule by decrees which are thinly disguised as laws. Anyone still doubting the nature of the system?
It’s fascism folks!

Aida
Guest

Please, could you send me a link to an English version?

tappanch
Guest

Dear Aida, There is no English version unless somebody or Google makes a translation. I am afraid. Désolé.

tappanch
Guest

There are two more new bills. They do not require 2/3 majority.

19775:
If an NGO is deemed to support “migration”, it has to pay 25% of its foreign-sourced income to the government.

http://www.parlament.hu/irom40/19775/19775.pdf

19774:
People can be expelled from their homes if they live within 8 kms from a border or Ferihegy airport or the downtown international ship harbor. (half of Budapest)

The good news is that MPs, MEPs or diplomats are exempt from the forced relocation.

http://www.parlament.hu/irom40/19774/19774.pdf

http://hvg.hu/itthon/20180214_Torvenyi_abszurd_Pinter_Sandor_donti_el_ki_mehet_haza

Ferenc
Guest

What I find hard to understand: WHY are OV&Co coming up with this sort of fully absurd, undemocratic, OK let’s just name it what it is fascistic law making?
The only reasoning I can come up with:
1.They completely lost their mind
2.They want to become so offensive that certain groups in HU society will come into action against them, which then they hope to be able to misuse (i.e.state of emergency)
3.They want to create more “enemies” outside of Hungary (mostly likely in the EU), and hope through this to mobilize their supporters more (in- and outside HU!)
4.They think to gain some votes (from Jobbik, as from others it’s impossible with this) with this nonsense at the elections

A combination of the above (or even all 4) are possible of course.

As a side note to 2: this means they would be very afraid, probably through knowing (or thinking to know) that others have serious evidence against them (basically against OV, the leader) and awaiting the best moment (elections) for releasing it to the public

Aida
Guest

Also to these, please

Guest

Absurd is not a strong enough word – soon Fidesz will show everyone how crazy they are!
Btw what about a law “against migration” of Hungarians to the rich West?
PS:
Our trolls are so quiet right now – is it too much even for them? 🙂

tappanch
Guest
Aida
Guest

Thanks. Is there an English version somewhere of the bills?

Ferenc
Guest

for fasted translation best ask at kormany.hu……

tappanch
Guest

Norbert Maxin, who was accused of spying for the US in 2015 was acquitted today. The second charge against Mr Maxin was that he warned the representative of the IMF in 2010 to protect their money from theft by the Hungarian government.

The prosecutor appealed the judgment.

https://blog.atlatszo.hu/2018/02/elsofokon-felmentettek-a-fideszes-kemugy-vadlottjait-az-ugyeszseg-fellebbezett/

tappanch
Guest

Every Budapest bus stop now carries a big sign from the government: “Stop Soros”. We just have to put a sticker over Soros to turn it into “Stop Orban” or “Stop Orban the thief”

Aida
Guest

Please could you send link to photos of bus stops?

tappanch
Guest

Search google for “soros plakat buszmegallo” . There is a bus stop photo from the facebook of “Ketfarku kutya part”, for instance.

tappanch
Guest

comment image

tappanch
Guest

The same billboard in every bus stop. The advertising space is owned by the French JCDecaux company. They gave the space to Fidesz cheaper than the usual price. In addition, the opposition has not been allowed to campaign so far. https://24.hu/belfold/2018/02/13/a-fidesz-plakatkampanyaban-megcsuszott-az-ido/

Guest

That’s nothing!
I remember last year that there were these slogans on every bus in Zala county – hastily applied to the left and right side and even on the back …
Buit I don’t remember which of the idiotic Fidesz nonsense sentences it was. 🙂
I think that most people really ignore all these crappy signs like those on the billboards – they’re just to make money for some advertising companies.
The only relevant point for Fidesz is that enough bunko paraszt (40% is enough if you follow Tappanch’s calculations) plus the Mü Magyar from Serbia, Romania etc vote for Holy O – and boing!
Another four years of paradise in Hungary (at least for some people with their Rolexes and Gucci bags) – the others don’t count!
Always remember Laser Johnny’s motto:
If you have nothing then you are nothing!

tappanch
Guest

Fidesz received less than 26% (2076 thousand) of the vote of the domestic electorate on party list in 2014.

Popular vote % (MP %)

FiDeSz: 25.89% (66.83%)
Opposition parties: 33.13% (33.17%)
Ethnic lists: 0.24% ( 0% )
Did not vote: 40.74% ( 0% )

Ferenc
Guest

This differs from all data I’ve seen before! From where do you have this data?

Member

I’d say we should leave that kind of thing for Fidelitas and Momentum.

The opposition needs to come up with snappy slogans of its own. As much as I dislike Jobbik’s policies, they are pros at this kind of thing.

tappanch
Guest

Daily fraud vigil.

S.
The number of mail-in applicants from the quickly growing Serbia, Transylvania and Fakistan is very close to 5% of the electorate 38 days before the registration deadline.

413072/(413072+7942336) = 4.94%

G.
The number of registered newly ethnic Germans has been growing rapidly, while the size of the other ethnic groups is unchanged.

(registered)/”on the list”

2018.02.04.
Gypsy: 20183/151708
German: 18191/ 41308
Slovak: 1617/ 11615
Croat: 2057/ 10163

2018.02.14
Gypsy: 20194/151670
German: 20578/ 42995
Slovak: 1628/ 11612
Croat: 2058/ 10160