Author Archives: Eva S. Balogh

György Matolcsy, the engine of the Hungarian economy, has his admirers

The first quarter year-over-year 0.5% GDP growth apparently shocked Viktor Orbán. He immediately convened an extraordinary cabinet meeting to discuss the situation, which put Hungary among the worst performing countries in the European Union. Later government communication tried to calm nerves by denying Orbán’s panicky response to the bad economic news, but the meeting definitely took place.

It is possible that the news was a surprise to Viktor Orbán, but people familiar with recent economic trends should have been prepared for slower growth than projected. In the last quarter of … Read the rest

From gas-fitter to owner of Chateau Dereszla

Today we are going to make a side trip to Tokaj where, believe it or not, Lőrinc Mészáros, who is considered to be Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s front man (stróman in Hungarian), is in the process of buying a vineyard. Not just any old vineyard but Chateau Dereszla, a 54-hectare estate owned by Count Patrick d’Aulan, an internationally known vintner with large estates in France and Argentina. Apparently, Dereszla has been a successful business since about 2000, with well-established markets in Poland and Russia. Mészáros’s purchase of the vineyard came … Read the rest

The anti-George Soros campaign intensifies in Hungary

A full-fledged witch hunt is taking place in Hungary against a not-at-all favorite son, George Soros. Two weeks ago I already wrote a post on the Orbán government’s reaction to the less than flattering remarks of Bill Clinton about Poland and Hungary, two countries that decided that “democracy is too much trouble [and] they want Putin-like leadership.” It was in this context that George Soros’s name was associated in Hungarian propaganda with Bill Clinton’s statement as well as with Barack Obama’s earlier critical words about Hungary. In the last two … Read the rest

Viktor Orbán’s favorite party failed to gain the Austrian presidency

On Tuesday Viktor Orbán, who seems to have an iron constitution, took the day off because, as his office announced, he was sick. Yesterday a humorous little piece appeared in Sztarklikk with the title: “That’s why Orbán fell ill.” Surely, the author said, Orbán needed to be revived with smelling salts after learning that Norbert Hofer, the candidate of the far-right Austrian Freedom Party (FPÖ), had narrowly lost the Austrian presidential election. Well, smelling salts might be a bit of an exaggeration, but Orbán’s disappointment had to be great because … Read the rest

Hungary is looking for a new source of funding for Paks-2

This morning one of the very first articles I read about Sergey Lavrov’s visit to Budapest, in Népszabadság, had the following headline: “Good Hungarian-Russian relations don’t depend on the extension of Paks.” The Russian foreign minister uttered these words at the joint press conference he and Hungarian Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó gave after their meeting. My first thought was that something had gone very wrong with Viktor Orbán’s pet project, the extension of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, to be built by Rosatom and financed by a state-owned Russian bank. … Read the rest

János Széky on secrets of the past well kept

I’m  pleased to be able to publish this essay by János Széky, whose writings on politics I have admired for years. János Széky is a man of many talents. He was originally known for his translations of the works of such writers as Thomas Pynchon, Mary Renault, Nathanael West, and Norman Mailer. Around 2006 he began writing on politics. He has a regular column in Élet és Irodalom, but one also finds his articles in several other highly respected publications. Last year he published his collected essays on politics Read the rest

Intellectual fraud in Hungary

Today I will cover two topics. First, the industry that has developed to write essays and research papers, without which a Hungarian student cannot receive his diploma. Using other people’s work and passing it off as your own is plagiarism. In legal terms, it is a fraud, which is a punishable act. Second, a historical fraud: the history of the pilgrimage of Csíksomlyó/Şumuleu Ciuc.

Researchers for hire

The other day I found a fascinating article in Magyar Nemzet about a service for those who, after four years of higher education, … Read the rest