Tag Archives: Áron Orbán

A new job for OLAF? Győző Orbán, the father of Viktor Orbán

Today’s Financial Times carries a lengthy portrait of Viktor Orbán by Neil Buckley, FT’s East European editor, and Andrew Byrne, the paper’s correspondent for Hungary, Romania, and Western Balkans. In this overview of the political career of Hungary’s maverick prime minister, the authors quote George Soros, who said that Orbán “started really going wrong when he made his father rich by giving him a quasi-monopoly on road-building materials, which was a big source of wealth. That’s when [he] started building a mafia state. It’s really when he actually gained power.”

As a matter of fact, immoral financial dealings have been part and parcel of Orbán’s whole career. In 1990 the new democratic parties were penniless and, in order to conduct their activities, they all received a large amount of seed money. Fidesz’s share was half of a very valuable downtown building, which the party sold for cash. Out of this money, quite fraudulently, a few million forints was given to Viktor Orbán’s father, Győző Orbán, who was short of the cash he needed to purchase a stone quarry owned by the state, of which he was the manager at the time.

As time went by, Orbán’s financial appetite grew. After he became prime minister in 1998, he was in the perfect position to work on fattening himself, his friends, and his family through inside information. He was especially interested in agricultural land because he knew that the landowners would receive considerable EU subsidies in the future.

His father’s quarry, just as George Soros remembered, became practically the sole supplier of crushed stone to state-owned companies involved in government-funded road construction. Once all this was discovered, there was an outcry, especially after the 2000 publication of a book on the shady affairs of the “first family.” Orbán, who in those days was a great deal less brazen, had a talk with his father which, according to the prime minister, wasn’t pleasant. His father couldn’t understand why he couldn’t continue supplying crushed rock for government projects.

Father and son

Although there has been less talk about Győző Orbán’s business activities since his son’s return to power, some investigative journalists are convinced that Orbán’s father still has his finger in the “government project” pie. The journalists who are most curious about the business affairs of the extended Orbán family work for Direkt36. It is a center for investigative journalists who work hand in hand with 444, the internet news site. Direct36 has a separate column called “business concerns of the Orbán family.” Two journalists, András Pethő and Blanka Zöldi, are especially busy collecting data on the elder Győző Orbán and his two sons, Győző, Jr., and Áron. Many of their articles can be found here. (As a point of linguistic and psychological curiosity: Győző is the Hungarian equivalent of Victor/Viktor. So Elder Győző named two of his sons after himself.)

In May of last year the journalists of Direkt36 reported that Győző’s crushed rock and concrete building materials were being transported to government projects, most of which are financed by European Union funds, like sewage systems and railroad construction in Érd, Budapest, Jászberény, and Püspökladány. While visiting these sites, the journalists noticed trucks with the name “Nehéz Kő” (Heavy Stone) delivering large amounts of crushed rock and building materials to the government projects. The journalists found out that the trucking company belonged to Áron Orbán (subsequently, it seems, Győző Orbán became the owner), and they suspected that the material Nehéz Kő was carrying came from Dolomit Kft., Győző Orbán’s company.

Dolomit was active throughout the country, but the journalists were especially interested in a mega-project, the construction of a 53 km  railroad line between Szántód and Balatonszentgyörgy with an estimated cost of 72.4 billion forints. The work is being done by a consortium of three firms: R-Kord Építőipari Kft., V-Híd Zrt., and Swietelsky Vasúttechnikai Kft. R-Kord is owned by (who else?) Lőrinc Mészáros.

Direkt36 suspected that they had just encountered a tightly-knit family business, but the reporters were unable to get hold of the documentation necessary to show that the elder Orbán was actually doing business with the government. Today, after months of litigation, Direkt36 received proof that, despite the denial by the prime minister, Nehéz Kő is one of the subcontractors of this EU-funded government project. By setting up a trucking company that doesn’t display the Dolomit name, the Orbáns presumably wanted to hide the fact that the material comes from the family company.

Last summer Blanka Zöldi of Direct36 confronted the prime minister with her findings that Győző Orbán is the supplier of stone and building material to important government projects. Viktor Orbán, during that Q&A session, made a distinction between general contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers. Hungarian law forbids, he claimed, the participation of close relatives of important political figures from being general and subcontractors, but not from being suppliers. Clearly, he said, his father and brother have no business dealings with the government. They have a contract with one of the general contractors. But the documents received today show that Nehéz Kő was a subcontractor on the southern Balaton railroad project to the tune of 300 million forints or $1.2 million.

The Demokratikus Koalíció, which helped call attention to the shady business dealings of Viktor Orbán’s son-in-law, István Tiborcz, is ready to turn to OLAF again. The party’s spokesman declared that “there is no civilized, democratic country where, after such a revelation, the prime minister remains in office. … The money coming from [Brussels] goes toward the enrichment of his family.”

This may be the case (although Trump stretches the limits of what it means to personally benefit from political office), but Hungary at the moment doesn’t belong to the group of civilized and democratic countries. In a mafia state, a designation popularized by Bálint Magyar, earlier minister of education, like-minded people in high political office work together for their own and their families’ enrichment. Here we have the quarry business of Győző Orbán, whose initial capital came from his son’s newly-formed party. His company, Dolomit, supplies stone and cement products to government projects, which are being trucked by his company, Nehéz Kő. The goods are taken to the work site of the firm owned by Lőrinc Mészáros, who is suspected of being the stróman or front man of Viktor Orbán. All in the family.

January 25, 2018