Tag Archives: globalization

Two days, two speeches: Viktor Orbán on a very wrong track

There are always a few people who phone into György Bolgár’s popular talk show on Klubrádió inquiring why he spends so much time on Viktor Orbán. The answer is simple. Orbán controls the country’s political, economic, and social agendas. Lately he has been busily promoting his ideas on topics ranging from religion to re-industrialization. Just in the last two days he made two speeches and gave his usual Friday morning interview to Magyar Rádió (which lately I’ve noticed French and German journalists correctly call state radio instead of public radio). And today the Spanish  El Mundo published an interview with Orbán on Christianity’s blessings for everyone, including nonbelievers.

Here I will tackle only the two speeches he delivered on April 18 and 19. The first was occasioned by an addition to the Stadler Rail Group’s plant near Szolnok. Stadler Rail is a Swiss company. The second also marked a plant expansion, this time by the Danish Lego Group at its Nyíregyháza facilities. There are practically no foreign companies that want to establish new factories in Hungary, so Orbán must be satisfied with even modest expansions of existing ones. Both Lego and Stadler have been operating in Hungary for a number of years. They came during the Gyurcsány and Bajnai governments.

Years ago, during his first premiership, Orbán made a since oft-quoted statement: “There is life outside the European Union.” In the last ten years or so he didn’t want to call attention to that much criticized sentence. At least not until two days ago when he said in his Szolnok speech: “I find it very important that the company that invests in Hungary is Swiss. Hungarians have always admired the Swiss and I am especially pleased that the Ambassador of Switzerland is also here. As school children we learned that Switzerland is a freedom loving country that has never given up its independence, horribile dictu didn’t even join the European Union. Switzerland is a good example that there is life outside the Union, so no one should be scared.” Well, that’s quite something although I doubt that Orbán actually wants to withdraw from the EU. He knows only too well that a financial collapse would follow secession.

There can be no better place to talk about the re-industrialization of the country than in a plant that manufactures railway vehicles and streetcars. The site gave Orbán an opportunity to repeat one of his favorite themes: that only industrial “production” constitutes real work. He will transform Hungary from a service-oriented society to one that is “work-based.” Any other kind of human activity is worthless. In fact, more than worthless. It leads straight to failure. Let’s see just what he has in mind. “Someone who works, produces will stay successful, the one who speculates on the financial market will fail; the one who is in the service industry cannot stand on his own feet.” I haven’t heard such stupidity for a very long time. Try to explain that to the Rothschilds or to Conrad Hilton. On the other hand, there is no guarantee whatsoever that someone producing industrial goods will succeed. Just think of all those companies that have died or that are struggling to keep their heads above water.

But wait, there’s more! According to Viktor Orbán, “we don’t live off others. We don’t live from the dole of the IMF or the European Union. The country is standing on its own feet because of  its economic accomplishments.” I can’t find words!

The next day it was time to visit Nyíregyháza where the Danish Lego Group is expanding its facilities. Here we found out from the Hungarian prime minister why Lego products are so popular. He has, he said, spent some time pondering over this puzzle and came up with the following hypothesis: “These toys are the expressions of the modern age, the world in which we live. In them we can find the greatest challenge of globalization. That challenge is how we can build separate worlds from almost practically identical components. … In 2010 we began exactly that kind of enterprise, which is not at all a game but which demands at least as much inventiveness and fantasy as building our own world from Lego comp0nents…. We Hungarians had to undertake the task of rebuilding a Hungary that is different from all other countries from components at our disposal in the twenty-first century…. We followed the spirit of Lego. We didn’t follow the well known path but started on our own, trying to remove the debris of the past.” And he went on and praised the inventiveness and creativity of Hungarians.

Let's build a country DecoJim's photostream / Flickr

Let’s build a country
DecoJim’s photostream / Flickr

Well, we know that the inventiveness and fantasy exhibited by György Matolcsy produced mighty few positive results. On the contrary, his unorthodox economic moves managed to send the Hungarian economy into recession. One mustn’t forget, although Orbán et al keep trying to rewrite history, that the Hungarian economy was on the rebound when he took office in 2010.

To build a separate Hungarian world today is impossible, and I suspect it was always impossible. Globalization is not a new phenomenon. I would also advise Orbán not to mix up Switzerland with Hungary.