Tag Archives: KEHI

Fidesz as an enabler of financial corruption

It will not be easy to learn the truth in the maze of lies that have been fed to the public about the relationships between prominent politicians of Fidesz and Csaba Tarsoly, owner and CEO of the Quaestor Group.

Here I will concentrate on a single transaction, the loan extended to ETO Park, a subsidiary of the Quaestor Group. On April 4 I wrote a post with the title “The Quaestor scandal and football” in which I expressed my suspicion that Csaba Tarsoly’s ties to the current government had a lot to do with his interest in and support for Viktor Orbán’s mania, football. Today I return to Győr, where the ETO Park and Stadium are located.

Let me stress that the issue of the ETO Park and Stadium is unrelated to the scandal that recently engulfed another Quaestor subsidiary, a brokerage firm. The Orbán government has used ETO Park and Stadium to divert attention from its cozy relationship with Tarsoly. It’s trying to shift the story instead to a loan that was extended to the ETO project during socialist governments.

In my earlier post on the subject I made a fleeting reference to questions about this project that arose in the Magyar Fejlesztési Bank (MFB/Hungarian Development Bank) in 2010, after the newly elected government changed the top management of the bank and ordered an investigation of all loans that had been extended during the socialist period. Today’s post is about this investigation and its aftermath.

Orban hazug

War = Peace; Freedom = Slavery; Ignorance = Strength

On April 8 several papers reported that Kormányellenőrzési Hivatal (KEHI/Government Audit Office), after an investigation, is pressing charges against people involved with the 17 billion forint loan MFB extended to ETO Park in two installments, in 2005 and 2008. The reason for the police action, according to M1 TV, was that KEHI discovered that MFB had accepted a 900 million forint grant as collateral for the loan, which was against the law. We were not told when KEHI found this irregularity. Origo reported earlier that KEHI had already looked into the case back in 2010 and found enough evidence to proceed and that it had asked for a police investigation at the time. So why, then, a second investigation of the same case? And why did neither the Chief Prosecutor’s Office nor the Budapest police know anything about an earlier investigation or police action in the case?

KEHI, which functions under the supervision of the prime minister’s office, has been known to be a willing vehicle of the government’s political interests. It’s enough to think of its move against the Ökotárs Foundation, which is responsible for the distribution of grants from the Norwegian Civic Fund, that resulted in a heavy-handed police action. The police are an equally willing partner when the government wants results, and quickly. So why did the police do nothing after 2010 and swing into action only now? Because this time, in a couple of days the police began hauling in former high officials of MFB as witnesses.

It didn’t take long before an important, new piece of information surfaced regarding the original case. On April 9 Népszava was informed “by certain sources that László Baranyay, the CEO of MFB at the time, wanted to press charges but the Fidesz political leadership prevented him from doing so.” Apparently, the charges included fraud, embezzlement, and breach of fiduciary responsibility.

About a week later, on April 15, Zsolt Gréczy, spokesman of the Demokratikus Koalíció, gave a press conference with two documents in hand which were allegedly proof that KEHI in March 2012 stopped the investigation of the case by the new management of MFB. According to the first document, the investigation was supposed to have been conducted between July and September 2011, after which the MFB management would have gone to Győr to take a look at the project, which at that point wasn’t quite finished. The final report was to be ready by October 31, 2011. Gréczy also had a letter in which KEHI informed Deputy CEO Zoltán Urbán that the office had suspended the investigation into the circumstances of the loan to ETO Park.

Index on the very same day learned a few more tidbits about the case. During the 2011 investigation KEHI talked to practically all former top officials of the bank, in addition to lower-level officers who had anything to do with the case. There was one man, however, whom they never contacted: Csaba Tarsoly, CEO of Quaestor. One informant told Index that during the procedure “in an informal way Tarsoly was being told about the details of the investigation.”

So far we can piece together a pretty coherent story, but KEHI is working hard to muddle it. When HírTV first asked KEHI about the details of the earlier investigation of MFB and ETO Park, they were told that KEHI had pressed charges on six accounts. Later KEHI changed the story: no, they didn’t do anything except investigate. That investigation had to be darned thorough because they began it in 2010 and only five years later did they have enough evidence to proceed. After Zsolt Gréczy’s revelations, KEHI denied outright that it ever stopped the investigation.

And finally, here is the latest explanation of what happened in 2011 and 2012, this time from János Lázár. As far as he knows, “KEHI didn’t stop the investigation; it only interrupted [megszakította] it.” Moreover, KEHI asked MFB to change the contract with ETO Park in order to safeguard the interests of the bank. But if the government was aware of the precarious state of Tarsoly’s financial empire, why did it make a gift of 250 million forints for the ETO Park project? Lázár’s surprising answer was: “It was not our job to make the loan unpayable.” In brief, the government helped out the ailing Quaestor as early as 2011, hoping to avoid the firm’s collapse.

The bankruptcy of Quaestor’s brokerage firm is a separate issue from the ETO Park project, which admittedly was not exactly a success story but was not responsible for the brokerage firm’s collapse. On the contrary, one can read stories about contractors working on the project in Győr who often didn’t receive payment on time. The management blamed MFB for not releasing the necessary amount of money at specified intervals. As it turned out, this was a lie. Tarsoly was simply using the loan to cover his tracks in his pyramid scheme.

If the Orbán government had wanted to point the finger at Ferenc Gyurcsány and Gordon Bajnai for not properly vetting the loan for the ETO Park project, it could have done so in 2010 or 2011. Instead, it stopped the investigation and kept trying to prop up Quaestor’s business ventures. It became an enabler of financial corruption.